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RE: [fearnwhiskey] Clip: A jazz quartet tribute to Pavement is, inexplicably, a roaring success.

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  • Wilson, Carl
    I think this article is more than a little dumb/unfair on the subject of Pavement. Sure, they were rough - they were no jazz musicians - but they didn t sound
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 2, 2005
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      I think this article is more than a little dumb/unfair on the subject of Pavement. Sure, they were rough - they were no jazz musicians - but they didn't sound like they did because they couldn't play. They sounded like they did because they were fans of Captain Beefheart, Sonic Youth and the Fall. It wasn't an accident.

      carl w.
    • Carl Z.
      Carl s critcism is on the mark, though I agree with Harvilla s basic premise that a jazz treatment of Pavement songs is not an obvious move -- less obvious
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 2, 2005
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        Carl's critcism is on the mark, though I agree with Harvilla's basic
        premise that a jazz treatment of Pavement songs is not an obvious move
        -- less obvious than, say, Lester Bowie covering the Notorious BIG.
        Thus my interest in forwarding the clip along.

        This talk of indie rock and jazz makes me pine for Universal Congress Of.

        harmolodically,
        Carl Z.

        On 11/3/05, Wilson, Carl <cwilson@...> wrote:
        > I think this article is more than a little dumb/unfair on the subject of
        > Pavement. Sure, they were rough - they were no jazz musicians - but they
        > didn't sound like they did because they couldn't play. They sounded like
        > they did because they were fans of Captain Beefheart, Sonic Youth and the
        > Fall. It wasn't an accident.
        >
        > carl w.
      • Wilson, Carl
        ... And certainly less obvious than all that jazz-Radiohead stuff, which I enjoyed the article s reference to. But jazz-Pavement is not as odd as it looks. If
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 3, 2005
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          > a jazz treatment of Pavement songs is not an obvious move
          > -- less obvious than, say, Lester Bowie covering the Notorious BIG.

          And certainly less obvious than all that jazz-Radiohead stuff, which I enjoyed the article's reference to.

          But jazz-Pavement is not as odd as it looks. If you consider the jazz influence on their influences - from Ornette/Ayler to Beefheart/Ubu/Fall/No Wave/SY to Pavement to here, it's kind of just coming full circle.

          Hey! Wow! Imagine a jazz album of rearranged Captain Beefheart. That would be fantastic.

          (Tip: This is where somebody grunts, "Pshaw, it would just sound exactly like [free jazz album X].")

          carl w.
        • Carl Z.
          ... Yes, although notions of virtuosity (or at least complex technique) are more at play in Beefheart , than, say, the Fall or Pavement. (Sonic Youth fall
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 3, 2005
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            On 11/4/05, Wilson, Carl <cwilson@...> wrote:
            > > a jazz treatment of Pavement songs is not an obvious move
            > > -- less obvious than, say, Lester Bowie covering the Notorious BIG.
            >
            > And certainly less obvious than all that jazz-Radiohead stuff, which I
            > enjoyed the article's reference to.
            >
            > But jazz-Pavement is not as odd as it looks. If you consider the jazz
            > influence on their influences - from Ornette/Ayler to Beefheart/Ubu/Fall/No
            > Wave/SY to Pavement to here, it's kind of just coming full circle.

            Yes, although notions of virtuosity (or at least complex technique)
            are more at play in Beefheart , than, say, the Fall or Pavement.
            (Sonic Youth fall somewhere in between, and Ubu varies depending on
            the lineup, but a lot of Ravenstine's work is technically complex.)

            > Hey! Wow! Imagine a jazz album of rearranged Captain Beefheart. That would
            > be fantastic.
            >
            > (Tip: This is where somebody grunts, "Pshaw, it would just sound exactly
            > like [free jazz album X].")

            Or like a lot of Gary Lucas's work post-Beeheart! Now, a jazz album
            of rearranged Fall would be pretty unexpected...and something I'd like
            to hear.

            Carl Z.
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