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Re: [fearnwhiskey] whisper, whistle... ?

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  • Carl A Zimring
    Here s a good one: I Feel Free by Cream.
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 3, 2005
      Here's a good one: "I Feel Free" by Cream.
    • Wilson, Carl
      ... That s a good thought, tho it s definitely a bit on the margin of the question - but the question s a little fuzzy still, so sure, why not? ... Heavy
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 3, 2005
        > Aside from the vocal sounds in doo-wop, can I test the
        > boundaries of your question and bring up the vocorder/talking
        > box sounds Joe Walsh and Peter Frampton used in the 70s?

        That's a good thought, tho it's definitely a bit on the margin of the question - but the question's a little fuzzy still, so sure, why not?

        > I seem to remember some disco songs where the rhythm was
        > built around heavy breathing and bass guitar but am drawing a
        > blank on names this early in the morning.

        Heavy breathing rhythm tracks would be *so* on target. If something occurs to you, let me know.

        Donna Summer's Bad Girls, with its "toot toot, ahhh, beep beep!" hook just popped into my mind. That feels relevant.

        > Oh yeah, are Cocteau Twins not poppy enough for consideration?

        Ehhhh, Cocteau Twins just doesn't seem right.
      • Jason Gross
        For whistling, there s Guy Mithcell s Singin the Blues and Professor Longhair s Big Chief. DJ Frankie Knuckles had The Whistle Song. Don t ask me how
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 4, 2005
          For whistling, there's Guy Mithcell's "Singin' the Blues" and
          Professor Longhair's "Big Chief." DJ Frankie Knuckles had "The
          Whistle Song." Don't ask me how I know this but Carly Simon whistled
          on one of her early albums and I'm pretty sure I remember Lennon
          doing it on "Nobody Loves You When You're Down and Out" and Sir Elton
          on "Benny and the Jets." For some reason, I seem to remember Stevie
          Wonder whistling on one of his albums too but maybe I imagined
          that... I'm sure that any Spike Jones record had 100's of whistles
          and strange vocal noises.

          There's also this recent book on yodels:
          "Yodel-Ay-Ee-Oooo: The History of Yodeling Around The World"

          For the Ying Yang Twins' song, I thought the "censored" version of
          the song was much better than the stupidly "explicit" version- leaves
          more to the imagination even if you can guess what they're talking
          about.

          Best,
          Jason

          Perfect Sound Forever
          online music magazine since 1993- now new and semi-improved!
          <http://www.perfectsoundforever.com>
          Yei Wei Blog aka Wild Taste: <http://yeweiblog.blogspot.com/>
        • Wilson, Carl
          Thanks, Jason - to clarify, i m not thinking so much of records where somebody whistles or yodels but ones that integrate that into the overall instrumental
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 4, 2005
            Thanks, Jason - to clarify, i'm not thinking so much of records where somebody whistles or yodels but ones that integrate that into the overall instrumental bed - much more Spike Jones than Professor Longhair.

            Do you know if there's a relationship between Frankie Knuckles' "The Whistle Song" and Juelz Santana's "There It Go (The Whistle Song)"? That's one of the things I've wanted to find out.

            carl w
          • Carl A Zimring
            ... I m not coming up with titles from the 1970s, but in more contemporary music, one of my favorite examples of this is Erykah Badu s I Want You . The
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 4, 2005
              > Heavy breathing rhythm tracks would be *so* on target. If something
              > occurs to you, let me know.

              I'm not coming up with titles from the 1970s, but in more contemporary music, one of my favorite examples of this is Erykah Badu's "I Want You". The breathing is part of the lead vocal, but the way the vocal is mixed into the track makes it less of a lead and part of the rhythm. It's hypnotic and maybe my favorite song she's done. I don't think it was particularly successful on the charts (it's a long song), so we're stretching the boundaries of pop. Quite danceable though.

              Would the backing vocals in Steely Dan's "Show Biz Kids" be along the lines of what you had in mind, Carl? The words are almost beside the point, and the vocals carry the rhythm of the track. Plus one wail qualifies as the only solo in the song!

              Carl Z.
            • Jason Baldwin
              Carl W. wrote:
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 7, 2005
                Carl W. wrote:
                < Heavy breathing rhythm tracks would be *so* on target. If
                < something occurs to you, let me know.

                If memory serves, much of the percussion on Tom Waits' last album, REAL
                GONE, is all vocal loops.

                -Jason, awake too early in Seattle post-Grand Champeen
              • Carl A Zimring
                ... I am suddenly remembering that one of Stevie Wonder s mid-80s songs (c. 1987) has samples of his heartbeat as the rhythm track. Not a vocal, but outside
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 7, 2005
                  > Carl W. wrote: < Heavy breathing rhythm tracks would be *so* on target.
                  > If < something occurs to you, let me know.
                  >
                  > If memory serves, much of the percussion on Tom Waits' last album, REAL
                  > GONE, is all vocal loops.

                  I am suddenly remembering that one of Stevie Wonder's mid-80s songs (c. 1987) has samples of his heartbeat as the rhythm track. Not a vocal, but outside the bounds of typical bodily noises in song.

                  Carl Z.
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