Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Clip: Funk Brothers Not Resting On 'Motown' Laurels

Expand Messages
  • Carl Zimring
    Funk Brothers Not Resting On Motown Laurels Thanks to the success of the
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 31, 2005
      <http://www.billboard.com/bb/daily/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1000779760>

      Funk Brothers Not Resting On 'Motown' Laurels

      Thanks to the success of the 2002 documentary "Standing in the Shadows of
      Motown," the Funk Brothers, ostensibly the musical backbone to Motown's
      golden era, have finally garnered recognition with the mainstream public.

      "There was about 40 Funk Brothers, if you want to know the truth," says
      group member Jack Ashford. "So that name Funk Brothers is really blown out
      of proportion when it's really the Motown musicians; the guys that really
      performed there."

      Having toured in the past with Joan Osborne, Maxi Priest, Darlene Love and
      Bootsy Collins, the current Ashford and Hunter-led incarnation of the Funk
      Brothers isn't relying on mainstream names to garner attention.

      "We had Ali 'Ollie' Woodson of the Temptations and we've had Freda Payne
      and Ron Isley," Ashford says. "But we're getting to the point where we
      don't need them because our background singers are strong enough to carry
      their own. We have Larry Johnson, who was touring with Mark Hayes. He's a
      tremendous front man and [keeps] growing."

      The Funk Brothers will be touring later this month in New York, Cleveland
      and Glenside, Pa., with a full slate of shows expected throughout the year.

      As for new recordings, Ashford plans on restarting his vintage label
      Ashford Records, which during its reign boasted a roster that included
      Lorraine Chandler and Eddie Parker. Ashford says the first release, due out
      sometime in 2005, may be a compilation featuring the Funk Brothers
      performing with various up-and-coming artists.

      "We have to reinvent ourselves," Ashford says. "We can't live on our old
      history. Of course, people come out and pay homage and things like that but
      I'm not looking for homage. I'm looking for new fans. I'm looking for
      something new because I have a lot more to contribute to music other than
      what I did back then. Now we have the opportunity to do that, we're just
      moving forward because we have a lot of things to do and we have less time
      to do it in."

      -- John Benson, Cleveland
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.