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[Fantasy Fiction Dungeon] Re: Harry Potter

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  • Ice Dragon
    Well, the clues were there along the way in the book. It happened near the end of the book, and I don t think that they played the death enough. I mean, so
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 2, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Well, the clues were there along the way in the book. It happened
      near the end of the book, and I don't think that they played the
      death enough. I mean, so Harry destroys some stuff in dumbledore's
      office, and that is the end of that. I think that the person could
      come back later, too. It seemed kind of rushed near the end, though.

      Alli

      --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, Matt Baker
      <gauvaine@y...> wrote:
      > About the death, JKR mentioned that she cried when she wrote that
      scene and it was so hard, blah, blah, blah. What was hard about it?
      It happened in two pages and was a minor aside to what was going on.
      And she wimped out and left it open to the person coming back later,
      i think. It wasn't that traumatic to me. And, like you, i suspected
      that's who it was before i even picked the book up.
      >
      > Ice Dragon <allipony@y...> wrote:Hmmm. I liked the cover of Harry
      Potter, the Canadian version at
      > least. Of course, I like the cover of the Fionavar tapestry
      better,
      > but I haven't read the book yet. I spend 1/2 an hour staring at
      the
      > cover. I am such a sucker when it comes to dragons...
      >
      > Anyways, where was I? Ah yes, Harry Potter. Well, one aspect of
      > Harry that I always found extaordinary was his kindness and his
      > sense of innocence while living with his evil aunt, uncle, and
      > cousin. After being locked in a closet for most of his life, you
      > would think that some flaw in his personality would come out in
      the
      > first 3 books. Just like Oliver Twist, Harry is more of a symbol
      in
      > the first few books.
      >
      > I agree with what you said about Harry's mood swings and temper in
      > this book. Personally, I found it a drastic change compared to the
      > first four books. All of a sudden, even before they get anywhere
      > near the train to go to hogwarts, Harry has lost his temper
      numerous
      > times, and doesn't listen to the voice of reason.
      >
      > The death that takes place (just incase somepeople haven't read
      it,
      > I woun't say who), I was expecting it would be who it was for most
      > of the way, and I found it to take place all of a sudden, a little
      > too quickly for my taste. No blood either. Of course, this is
      > supposed to be a children's book, so I suppose that it can't be
      > saturated in blood...
      >
      > Overall, though, it was ok, but not worth all of the hype that it
      > got.
      >
      > Alli
      >
      > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt"
      <gauvaine@y...>
      > wrote:
      > > Harry Potter and the Meaning of Life
      > > Usually, i don't give book reviews. After all, every person is
      > > different, their opinions fluttering here and there like mad
      ducks
      > on
      > > the wing, meandering all over a bright blue sky. But with all
      the
      > > recent madness of the launch of HPATOOTP (Harry Potter and Order
      > the
      > > Phoenix, for the uninitiated)i deemed it noteworthy to post my
      > > thoughts, unfocused as they might be.
      > >
      > > Keep in mind that Potterage is supposedly meant for kids, ie,
      > > adolescents and teens, though it's obvious every demographic is
      > > affected by this phoenomenon. So, an adult point of view might
      > seem
      > > superflous. However, being that 90 percent of the books
      purchased
      > > since last week have undoubtedly been done so by adults doing so
      > for
      > > themselves, their childen and grandchildren, maybe it should be
      > given
      > > some consideration. A smidgen. Just a drop.
      > >
      > > Like Goblet of Fire, OTP (Order of the Phoenix, for short) was a
      > > hefty tome of myraid characters and further setting development
      > and
      > > overall story arch as it relates to YOU-KNOW-WHO. It seems to me
      > that
      > > the last two books have been more along this theme then the
      stand-
      > > alone, gripping adventures of the previous three books. Of
      course,
      > > the first three books were an excellent adventure of a boy
      trying
      > to
      > > find his place in two worlds, haunted by his past; the last two
      > books
      > > are of a marketing juggernaut trying to make the world shout out
      > the
      > > words, "ching, ching!"
      > >
      > > Has JKR started to believe her own immortality and
      infallibility?
      > Has
      > > she lost her focus as a writer and embraced the capitalist ethic
      > of
      > > intrepid entreprise? Who knows, but it seems obvious that more
      is
      > > definitely not better.
      > >
      > > Our intrepid hero, our noble man thrust once more unto the
      breach,
      > > dear friends . . . is a belligerent, whining, spastic, bi-polar
      > git.
      > > How the mighty have fallen. Within the 879 pages, I am quite
      > certain
      > > that Harry lost his temper 1234 times. I'm not sure. That comes
      > out
      > > to 1.4 times per page. Anger management therapy is definitely an
      > > option in book six, rumored to be titled "Harry Potter and the
      Bi-
      > > Polar Flubberworms of Death."
      > >
      > > Granted, 15 year old boys are moody and conflicted with hormones
      > and
      > > tangled emotions, but not like this manic depressive Munchausen
      > > Syndrome candidate. Our modest Harry, our victim of
      circumstance,
      > our
      > > protector of the common weal, makes Bronte's Heathcliff look
      like
      > > Tony Robbins. He fumes. He rages. He yells. When he is not being
      > > quiet, self-absorbed, and withdrawn. A couple of times he was
      > happy
      > > and smiled. Such mood swings are symptoms of something alot more
      > > serious than pubescent metamorphosis. Maybe Madame Pomfrey has
      > some
      > > Paxil or Prozac in the medical wing of Hogwarts that she can
      grind
      > up
      > > into some Bertie Bott's Every Flavor beans.
      > >
      > > Of course, the whole gang was in this book, plus some new faces.
      > > Sirius Black, Professor Lupin, Mad-Eye Moody, the Weasley's and
      > > Malfoys. Even Dobby turned up here and there. All good things,
      if
      > not
      > > a bit disappointing for their 2-dimensional standing.
      > > Characterization is not one of JFK's strongpoints, afterall.
      > > Protagonists don't protag as much as they are steered by
      secondary
      > > characters that have no life or color to them.
      > >
      > > For example, after nearly losing his life and still being in
      > mortal
      > > danger, Arthur Weasley had no epiphanies or emotional outbursts.
      > > Neither did his wife. It seems emotion is only sparked from
      Molly
      > > Weasley when she is needed for comic relief to yell at Fred or
      > > George, or just to yell in general. She visits her husband in
      the
      > > hospital and pats him on the shoulder after his near murder. No
      > > tears. No emotional scenes of love and endearment. That would
      have
      > > been too deep and normal. I guess only Muggles act like they
      have
      > > commmitted, loving relationships and not the stock, juvenile
      > > gobbledygook that represents life in the adult world of JFK's
      > books.
      > >
      > > Her attempt at darkness and making Harry have to overcome real
      > world,
      > > life and death choices, has turned into a mish mash of bad
      > > characterization, inconsistent theme, and long-winded plotting.
      > It's
      > > a disappointment.
      > >
      > > Having said that, there are, of course, some highpoints. Ron and
      > > Hermione had more to do, though they still remain 2 dimenionsal,
      > as
      > > does everyone else, though some clarity was given to Snape and
      his
      > > hatred of everything Potter. Neville Longbottom had a larger
      role
      > to
      > > play, as did Ginny Weasley and several others. Dumbledore was
      > absent
      > > until the end, when there was the rollicking, Gunfight at the
      O.K.
      > > Coral finale. And Hagrid was a non-entity except to fill a plot
      > hole
      > > that Rowling had backed herself into and couldn't seem to get
      out
      > of
      > > very adroitly.
      > >
      > > There was alot to this book. Alot happening. And nothing
      > happening.
      > > That's the only way to explain it. Much Ado About Nothing. It
      was
      > > like watching the Matrix Reloaded. It was okay, but you knew
      that
      > > there was another movie coming that was going to be alot more
      > clearer
      > > and exciting. Treading water. The rumors of writer's block were
      > true,
      > > i'm afraid. A post-adolescent diatribe about the merits of fame,
      > > fortune and destiny only can go so far. Dialogue, characters,
      and
      > > theme . . . they all matter. You can't coast on expectation and
      > fame.
      > > Even Harry knows that.
      >
      >
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      >
      >
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      >
      >
      >
      > "For better or worse, you have been marked."
      >
      > ---------------------------------
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    • Matt Baker
      I think the press hyped up the major character dying angle, to raise the awareness of the book, as if that was needed. Initially, i thought it was going to
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 3, 2003
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        I think the press hyped up the "major character dying" angle, to raise the awareness of the book, as if that was needed. Initially, i thought it was going to be Hagrid, or even Ron or Hermione . . . but i think people would have hated that, so she had to eliminate a minor character.

        Ice Dragon <allipony@...> wrote:Well, the clues were there along the way in the book. It happened
        near the end of the book, and I don't think that they played the
        death enough. I mean, so Harry destroys some stuff in dumbledore's
        office, and that is the end of that. I think that the person could
        come back later, too. It seemed kind of rushed near the end, though.

        Alli

        --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, Matt Baker
        <gauvaine@y...> wrote:
        > About the death, JKR mentioned that she cried when she wrote that
        scene and it was so hard, blah, blah, blah. What was hard about it?
        It happened in two pages and was a minor aside to what was going on.
        And she wimped out and left it open to the person coming back later,
        i think. It wasn't that traumatic to me. And, like you, i suspected
        that's who it was before i even picked the book up.
        >
        > Ice Dragon <allipony@y...> wrote:Hmmm. I liked the cover of Harry
        Potter, the Canadian version at
        > least. Of course, I like the cover of the Fionavar tapestry
        better,
        > but I haven't read the book yet. I spend 1/2 an hour staring at
        the
        > cover. I am such a sucker when it comes to dragons...
        >
        > Anyways, where was I? Ah yes, Harry Potter. Well, one aspect of
        > Harry that I always found extaordinary was his kindness and his
        > sense of innocence while living with his evil aunt, uncle, and
        > cousin. After being locked in a closet for most of his life, you
        > would think that some flaw in his personality would come out in
        the
        > first 3 books. Just like Oliver Twist, Harry is more of a symbol
        in
        > the first few books.
        >
        > I agree with what you said about Harry's mood swings and temper in
        > this book. Personally, I found it a drastic change compared to the
        > first four books. All of a sudden, even before they get anywhere
        > near the train to go to hogwarts, Harry has lost his temper
        numerous
        > times, and doesn't listen to the voice of reason.
        >
        > The death that takes place (just incase somepeople haven't read
        it,
        > I woun't say who), I was expecting it would be who it was for most
        > of the way, and I found it to take place all of a sudden, a little
        > too quickly for my taste. No blood either. Of course, this is
        > supposed to be a children's book, so I suppose that it can't be
        > saturated in blood...
        >
        > Overall, though, it was ok, but not worth all of the hype that it
        > got.
        >
        > Alli
        >
        > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt"
        <gauvaine@y...>
        > wrote:
        > > Harry Potter and the Meaning of Life
        > > Usually, i don't give book reviews. After all, every person is
        > > different, their opinions fluttering here and there like mad
        ducks
        > on
        > > the wing, meandering all over a bright blue sky. But with all
        the
        > > recent madness of the launch of HPATOOTP (Harry Potter and Order
        > the
        > > Phoenix, for the uninitiated)i deemed it noteworthy to post my
        > > thoughts, unfocused as they might be.
        > >
        > > Keep in mind that Potterage is supposedly meant for kids, ie,
        > > adolescents and teens, though it's obvious every demographic is
        > > affected by this phoenomenon. So, an adult point of view might
        > seem
        > > superflous. However, being that 90 percent of the books
        purchased
        > > since last week have undoubtedly been done so by adults doing so
        > for
        > > themselves, their childen and grandchildren, maybe it should be
        > given
        > > some consideration. A smidgen. Just a drop.
        > >
        > > Like Goblet of Fire, OTP (Order of the Phoenix, for short) was a
        > > hefty tome of myraid characters and further setting development
        > and
        > > overall story arch as it relates to YOU-KNOW-WHO. It seems to me
        > that
        > > the last two books have been more along this theme then the
        stand-
        > > alone, gripping adventures of the previous three books. Of
        course,
        > > the first three books were an excellent adventure of a boy
        trying
        > to
        > > find his place in two worlds, haunted by his past; the last two
        > books
        > > are of a marketing juggernaut trying to make the world shout out
        > the
        > > words, "ching, ching!"
        > >
        > > Has JKR started to believe her own immortality and
        infallibility?
        > Has
        > > she lost her focus as a writer and embraced the capitalist ethic
        > of
        > > intrepid entreprise? Who knows, but it seems obvious that more
        is
        > > definitely not better.
        > >
        > > Our intrepid hero, our noble man thrust once more unto the
        breach,
        > > dear friends . . . is a belligerent, whining, spastic, bi-polar
        > git.
        > > How the mighty have fallen. Within the 879 pages, I am quite
        > certain
        > > that Harry lost his temper 1234 times. I'm not sure. That comes
        > out
        > > to 1.4 times per page. Anger management therapy is definitely an
        > > option in book six, rumored to be titled "Harry Potter and the
        Bi-
        > > Polar Flubberworms of Death."
        > >
        > > Granted, 15 year old boys are moody and conflicted with hormones
        > and
        > > tangled emotions, but not like this manic depressive Munchausen
        > > Syndrome candidate. Our modest Harry, our victim of
        circumstance,
        > our
        > > protector of the common weal, makes Bronte's Heathcliff look
        like
        > > Tony Robbins. He fumes. He rages. He yells. When he is not being
        > > quiet, self-absorbed, and withdrawn. A couple of times he was
        > happy
        > > and smiled. Such mood swings are symptoms of something alot more
        > > serious than pubescent metamorphosis. Maybe Madame Pomfrey has
        > some
        > > Paxil or Prozac in the medical wing of Hogwarts that she can
        grind
        > up
        > > into some Bertie Bott's Every Flavor beans.
        > >
        > > Of course, the whole gang was in this book, plus some new faces.
        > > Sirius Black, Professor Lupin, Mad-Eye Moody, the Weasley's and
        > > Malfoys. Even Dobby turned up here and there. All good things,
        if
        > not
        > > a bit disappointing for their 2-dimensional standing.
        > > Characterization is not one of JFK's strongpoints, afterall.
        > > Protagonists don't protag as much as they are steered by
        secondary
        > > characters that have no life or color to them.
        > >
        > > For example, after nearly losing his life and still being in
        > mortal
        > > danger, Arthur Weasley had no epiphanies or emotional outbursts.
        > > Neither did his wife. It seems emotion is only sparked from
        Molly
        > > Weasley when she is needed for comic relief to yell at Fred or
        > > George, or just to yell in general. She visits her husband in
        the
        > > hospital and pats him on the shoulder after his near murder. No
        > > tears. No emotional scenes of love and endearment. That would
        have
        > > been too deep and normal. I guess only Muggles act like they
        have
        > > commmitted, loving relationships and not the stock, juvenile
        > > gobbledygook that represents life in the adult world of JFK's
        > books.
        > >
        > > Her attempt at darkness and making Harry have to overcome real
        > world,
        > > life and death choices, has turned into a mish mash of bad
        > > characterization, inconsistent theme, and long-winded plotting.
        > It's
        > > a disappointment.
        > >
        > > Having said that, there are, of course, some highpoints. Ron and
        > > Hermione had more to do, though they still remain 2 dimenionsal,
        > as
        > > does everyone else, though some clarity was given to Snape and
        his
        > > hatred of everything Potter. Neville Longbottom had a larger
        role
        > to
        > > play, as did Ginny Weasley and several others. Dumbledore was
        > absent
        > > until the end, when there was the rollicking, Gunfight at the
        O.K.
        > > Coral finale. And Hagrid was a non-entity except to fill a plot
        > hole
        > > that Rowling had backed herself into and couldn't seem to get
        out
        > of
        > > very adroitly.
        > >
        > > There was alot to this book. Alot happening. And nothing
        > happening.
        > > That's the only way to explain it. Much Ado About Nothing. It
        was
        > > like watching the Matrix Reloaded. It was okay, but you knew
        that
        > > there was another movie coming that was going to be alot more
        > clearer
        > > and exciting. Treading water. The rumors of writer's block were
        > true,
        > > i'm afraid. A post-adolescent diatribe about the merits of fame,
        > > fortune and destiny only can go so far. Dialogue, characters,
        and
        > > theme . . . they all matter. You can't coast on expectation and
        > fame.
        > > Even Harry knows that.
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
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        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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        >
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        >
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      • Ice Dragon
        Well, I don t know about the rest of you, but I really didn t consider the character who died to be that major. I mean, he doesn t come up that often. When I
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 4, 2003
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          Well, I don't know about the rest of you, but I really didn't
          consider the character who died to be that major. I mean, he doesn't
          come up that often. When I first heard that someone was going to
          die, though, I thought that it was going to be maybe Dumbledore or
          someone like that, but once I started reading the book it became
          more obvious.

          --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, Matt Baker
          <gauvaine@y...> wrote:
          > I think the press hyped up the "major character dying" angle, to
          raise the awareness of the book, as if that was needed. Initially, i
          thought it was going to be Hagrid, or even Ron or Hermione . . . but
          i think people would have hated that, so she had to eliminate a
          minor character.
          >
          > Ice Dragon <allipony@y...> wrote:Well, the clues were there along
          the way in the book. It happened
          > near the end of the book, and I don't think that they played the
          > death enough. I mean, so Harry destroys some stuff in dumbledore's
          > office, and that is the end of that. I think that the person could
          > come back later, too. It seemed kind of rushed near the end,
          though.
          >
          > Alli
          >
          > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, Matt Baker
          > <gauvaine@y...> wrote:
          > > About the death, JKR mentioned that she cried when she wrote
          that
          > scene and it was so hard, blah, blah, blah. What was hard about
          it?
          > It happened in two pages and was a minor aside to what was going
          on.
          > And she wimped out and left it open to the person coming back
          later,
          > i think. It wasn't that traumatic to me. And, like you, i
          suspected
          > that's who it was before i even picked the book up.
          > >
          > > Ice Dragon <allipony@y...> wrote:Hmmm. I liked the cover of
          Harry
          > Potter, the Canadian version at
          > > least. Of course, I like the cover of the Fionavar tapestry
          > better,
          > > but I haven't read the book yet. I spend 1/2 an hour staring at
          > the
          > > cover. I am such a sucker when it comes to dragons...
          > >
          > > Anyways, where was I? Ah yes, Harry Potter. Well, one aspect of
          > > Harry that I always found extaordinary was his kindness and his
          > > sense of innocence while living with his evil aunt, uncle, and
          > > cousin. After being locked in a closet for most of his life, you
          > > would think that some flaw in his personality would come out in
          > the
          > > first 3 books. Just like Oliver Twist, Harry is more of a symbol
          > in
          > > the first few books.
          > >
          > > I agree with what you said about Harry's mood swings and temper
          in
          > > this book. Personally, I found it a drastic change compared to
          the
          > > first four books. All of a sudden, even before they get anywhere
          > > near the train to go to hogwarts, Harry has lost his temper
          > numerous
          > > times, and doesn't listen to the voice of reason.
          > >
          > > The death that takes place (just incase somepeople haven't read
          > it,
          > > I woun't say who), I was expecting it would be who it was for
          most
          > > of the way, and I found it to take place all of a sudden, a
          little
          > > too quickly for my taste. No blood either. Of course, this is
          > > supposed to be a children's book, so I suppose that it can't be
          > > saturated in blood...
          > >
          > > Overall, though, it was ok, but not worth all of the hype that
          it
          > > got.
          > >
          > > Alli
          > >
          > > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt"
          > <gauvaine@y...>
          > > wrote:
          > > > Harry Potter and the Meaning of Life
          > > > Usually, i don't give book reviews. After all, every person is
          > > > different, their opinions fluttering here and there like mad
          > ducks
          > > on
          > > > the wing, meandering all over a bright blue sky. But with all
          > the
          > > > recent madness of the launch of HPATOOTP (Harry Potter and
          Order
          > > the
          > > > Phoenix, for the uninitiated)i deemed it noteworthy to post my
          > > > thoughts, unfocused as they might be.
          > > >
          > > > Keep in mind that Potterage is supposedly meant for kids, ie,
          > > > adolescents and teens, though it's obvious every demographic
          is
          > > > affected by this phoenomenon. So, an adult point of view might
          > > seem
          > > > superflous. However, being that 90 percent of the books
          > purchased
          > > > since last week have undoubtedly been done so by adults doing
          so
          > > for
          > > > themselves, their childen and grandchildren, maybe it should
          be
          > > given
          > > > some consideration. A smidgen. Just a drop.
          > > >
          > > > Like Goblet of Fire, OTP (Order of the Phoenix, for short) was
          a
          > > > hefty tome of myraid characters and further setting
          development
          > > and
          > > > overall story arch as it relates to YOU-KNOW-WHO. It seems to
          me
          > > that
          > > > the last two books have been more along this theme then the
          > stand-
          > > > alone, gripping adventures of the previous three books. Of
          > course,
          > > > the first three books were an excellent adventure of a boy
          > trying
          > > to
          > > > find his place in two worlds, haunted by his past; the last
          two
          > > books
          > > > are of a marketing juggernaut trying to make the world shout
          out
          > > the
          > > > words, "ching, ching!"
          > > >
          > > > Has JKR started to believe her own immortality and
          > infallibility?
          > > Has
          > > > she lost her focus as a writer and embraced the capitalist
          ethic
          > > of
          > > > intrepid entreprise? Who knows, but it seems obvious that more
          > is
          > > > definitely not better.
          > > >
          > > > Our intrepid hero, our noble man thrust once more unto the
          > breach,
          > > > dear friends . . . is a belligerent, whining, spastic, bi-
          polar
          > > git.
          > > > How the mighty have fallen. Within the 879 pages, I am quite
          > > certain
          > > > that Harry lost his temper 1234 times. I'm not sure. That
          comes
          > > out
          > > > to 1.4 times per page. Anger management therapy is definitely
          an
          > > > option in book six, rumored to be titled "Harry Potter and the
          > Bi-
          > > > Polar Flubberworms of Death."
          > > >
          > > > Granted, 15 year old boys are moody and conflicted with
          hormones
          > > and
          > > > tangled emotions, but not like this manic depressive
          Munchausen
          > > > Syndrome candidate. Our modest Harry, our victim of
          > circumstance,
          > > our
          > > > protector of the common weal, makes Bronte's Heathcliff look
          > like
          > > > Tony Robbins. He fumes. He rages. He yells. When he is not
          being
          > > > quiet, self-absorbed, and withdrawn. A couple of times he was
          > > happy
          > > > and smiled. Such mood swings are symptoms of something alot
          more
          > > > serious than pubescent metamorphosis. Maybe Madame Pomfrey has
          > > some
          > > > Paxil or Prozac in the medical wing of Hogwarts that she can
          > grind
          > > up
          > > > into some Bertie Bott's Every Flavor beans.
          > > >
          > > > Of course, the whole gang was in this book, plus some new
          faces.
          > > > Sirius Black, Professor Lupin, Mad-Eye Moody, the Weasley's
          and
          > > > Malfoys. Even Dobby turned up here and there. All good things,
          > if
          > > not
          > > > a bit disappointing for their 2-dimensional standing.
          > > > Characterization is not one of JFK's strongpoints, afterall.
          > > > Protagonists don't protag as much as they are steered by
          > secondary
          > > > characters that have no life or color to them.
          > > >
          > > > For example, after nearly losing his life and still being in
          > > mortal
          > > > danger, Arthur Weasley had no epiphanies or emotional
          outbursts.
          > > > Neither did his wife. It seems emotion is only sparked from
          > Molly
          > > > Weasley when she is needed for comic relief to yell at Fred or
          > > > George, or just to yell in general. She visits her husband in
          > the
          > > > hospital and pats him on the shoulder after his near murder.
          No
          > > > tears. No emotional scenes of love and endearment. That would
          > have
          > > > been too deep and normal. I guess only Muggles act like they
          > have
          > > > commmitted, loving relationships and not the stock, juvenile
          > > > gobbledygook that represents life in the adult world of JFK's
          > > books.
          > > >
          > > > Her attempt at darkness and making Harry have to overcome real
          > > world,
          > > > life and death choices, has turned into a mish mash of bad
          > > > characterization, inconsistent theme, and long-winded
          plotting.
          > > It's
          > > > a disappointment.
          > > >
          > > > Having said that, there are, of course, some highpoints. Ron
          and
          > > > Hermione had more to do, though they still remain 2
          dimenionsal,
          > > as
          > > > does everyone else, though some clarity was given to Snape and
          > his
          > > > hatred of everything Potter. Neville Longbottom had a larger
          > role
          > > to
          > > > play, as did Ginny Weasley and several others. Dumbledore was
          > > absent
          > > > until the end, when there was the rollicking, Gunfight at the
          > O.K.
          > > > Coral finale. And Hagrid was a non-entity except to fill a
          plot
          > > hole
          > > > that Rowling had backed herself into and couldn't seem to get
          > out
          > > of
          > > > very adroitly.
          > > >
          > > > There was alot to this book. Alot happening. And nothing
          > > happening.
          > > > That's the only way to explain it. Much Ado About Nothing. It
          > was
          > > > like watching the Matrix Reloaded. It was okay, but you knew
          > that
          > > > there was another movie coming that was going to be alot more
          > > clearer
          > > > and exciting. Treading water. The rumors of writer's block
          were
          > > true,
          > > > i'm afraid. A post-adolescent diatribe about the merits of
          fame,
          > > > fortune and destiny only can go so far. Dialogue, characters,
          > and
          > > > theme . . . they all matter. You can't coast on expectation
          and
          > > fame.
          > > > Even Harry knows that.
          > >
          > >
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        • Matt
          A couple of weeks ago, book critic David Kipen wrote a not so flattering review of Harry Potter and the quest for more royalties, er, the Half-Blood Prince.
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 1, 2005
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            A couple of weeks ago, book critic David Kipen wrote a not so
            flattering review of Harry Potter and the quest for more royalties,
            er, the Half-Blood Prince. Subsequently, he received hate mail from
            rabid J.K. Rowling zealots and Harry Potter followers.

            Heres an interesting rebuttal article:

            http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?
            f=/c/a/2005/07/26/DDGBKDSBJR1.DTL
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