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Re: [Fantasy Fiction Dungeon] Reading a book to the end....

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  • Yvette
    Matt welcome back... It s been awhile. Glad jeff stepped in to help. I have been battling ice storms and water back-ups. Yvette ... early ... Towers ... you
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 15, 2006
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      Matt welcome back... It's been awhile. Glad jeff stepped in to help.
      I have been battling ice storms and water back-ups. Yvette



      --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <gauvaine@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Charity,
      > I read the Magic of Recluce back when it came out in the
      early
      > 1990's and loved it. I picked up the next one, which was the
      Towers
      > of the Sunset, I believe, and it was a storyline that took place a
      > thousand years in the past. WTH!!? I think i liked it more than
      you
      > did, however. The next one after that skipped a few hundred years
      > forward. His writing doesn't change and his characters are always
      > good. He focuses on characterization and world building, mainly
      > cultural details and governmental maneuvering and plotting by the
      > strong to oppress the weak. Chaos vs Order. It's a good concept,
      but
      > i think he's beaten it to death a little bit at this point.
      >
      > I've read all the standard fantasy niches over the years. Tolkien,
      of
      > course. Le Guinn. McKillip. Lloyd Alexander. Terry Brooks, Feist,
      > Eddings, Salvatore, Jordan, Tad Williams, George R.R. Martin,
      David
      > Gemmell, Simon Green, Glen Cook, Piers Anthony, J.K. Rowling,etc,
      > etc. Some are good, some are middling, some are mediocre. I'm
      finding
      > mediocre more than the good, though, and it's frustrating.
      >
      > I used to be one of those people who read a book all the way
      through,
      > whether it was good or terribe, just so i could have the
      > accomplishment of having finished it, hoping that it got better as
      I
      > read or feeling exhilirated when there was another one in the
      series.
      >
      > I haven't felt that in a while. The last fantasy book i read,
      which
      > was a page turner, was Elantris by Sanderson. A bit trite in some
      > places but the plotting and world building were excellent and the
      > characters were very well defined. I've tried and failed to read
      > dozens of books the last few years that i just can't find an
      interest
      > in finishing. I don't have time for it. I'm in graduate school,
      work
      > full-time, and have three kids. Who has time to read when it's not
      a
      > textbook or a picture book? Or a book on SQL, FLASH 8, or
      Dreamweaver
      > for that matter.
      >
      > I've switched to more offbeat things, trying to find something
      that's
      > different. There's not alot of that. you have to find it. Indie
      > publisher's mostly. I did pick up a new Glen Cook series, Cecila
      Dart
      > Thornton, and a few Jack McDevitt science fiction books that are
      > promising.
      >
      > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "C. M. Van Vleet"
      > <alwaysadventuring@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I think in the last year, I've only had one instance of this.
      The
      > author was
      > > L. E. Modesit and the book was The Magic of Recluce. I forced
      > myself to
      > > read this because of another fantasy reader's recommendation. By
      > the end of
      > > it I fell in love with the main characters - they were the only
      > thing that
      > > kept me reading it. I bought the next two books, thinking it
      would
      > > surely feature these two characters and was utterly disgusted to
      > find there
      > > wasn't a mention of either one in either of the books. In fact,
      it
      > > was a brand new storyline for both. I didn't make it past the
      first
      > ten
      > > pages of the second book and returned them.
      > >
      > > However, I have had instances where I've gotten tired of a
      series -
      > R.A.
      > > Salvatore, the Dragonlance books, and Anne McAffrey are
      examples. I
      > loved
      > > the Dragon Rider series by McAffrey - up to a point. When she
      > stopped moving
      > > forward with the series and began branching out into side
      stories
      > about
      > > individual characters, I completely lost interest. The other two
      > series'
      > > just kept repeating the same general plots which got very old
      for
      > me.
      > >
      > > I do have several authors that I follow regularly in the fantasy
      > realm -
      > > Terry Brooks (the Shannara series - been reading it since I was
      a
      > kid),
      > > Terry Goodkind, Piers Anthony, and Sara Douglass to name a few.
      I
      > usually
      > > only seek out authors that have been recommended to me by fellow
      > fantasy
      > > readers or book store employees, which might be why I don't have
      a
      > big
      > > problem with getting books that I don't want to read or have to
      > force myself
      > > through. Of course, that does mean I regularly run out of
      reading
      > material
      > > for a while until I can find something else.... but I'm a pretty
      > picky
      > > reader and don't like taking chances with what I read. And no
      > matter how
      > > much I try, some books I just can't get into - like Robert
      Jordan's
      > work.
      > > He's just too long winded for me.
      > >
      > > One thing I have noticed is that even with that, I've learned of
      > things to
      > > avoid doing in my own writing. Terry Brooks tends to be somewhat
      > repeatative
      > > in his work because his series is so long and his following so
      > large, he has
      > > to make sure that if you haven't read the series in the last few
      > years, you
      > > remember where you left off. Unfortuantely for me, this tends to
      be
      > a bit
      > > redundant as I have an extremely good memory. I think he tends
      to
      > overdo
      > > that a little bit which is something I wish to avoid.
      > >
      > > Terry Brooks tends to use his books to spout his own viewpoints
      on
      > truth,
      > > justice and morality. It's a bit annoying but eventually you get
      > used to it
      > > and just allow it.
      > >
      > > Sara Douglass is a relatively new author from Australia whose
      work
      > I love.
      > > The only problem is it's a bit hard to come by and her series
      isn't
      > really
      > > that big yet (only six books) but extremely good.
      > >
      > > Charity
      > >
      > >
      > > On 12/11/06, jcherper <jcherper@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Matt (our illustrious leader) and I were discussing about
      how
      > we have
      > > > both gotten to a point that if a book is not flowing, and we
      are
      > > > having to slog through it, we both give up on the book. I
      started
      > > > thinking about this. In the past year there are about 2 dozen
      > books
      > > > that I started, found unbelievably dull so I just dumped them.
      > Are we
      > > > the only ones? Do you slog through to the finish regardless,
      or
      > are
      > > > you more likely to toss the book aside and read something
      better?
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --
      > > Charity
      > > - As long as you're writing, you're succeeding. ~C. M. Van Vleet
      > > - Wisdom: Truth in simple terms. ~C.M. Van Vleet
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
    • Matt
      It s good to be back. I ve been monitoring, just haven t had much time to post. Graduate school has sucked up all my free time, what little of it there is. I m
      Message 2 of 18 , Dec 19, 2006
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        It's good to be back. I've been monitoring, just haven't had much
        time to post. Graduate school has sucked up all my free time, what
        little of it there is. I'm hoping that over xmas break, i get a
        chance to get some books read.

        --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Yvette"
        <yvette_n_chad@...> wrote:
        >
        > Matt welcome back... It's been awhile. Glad jeff stepped in to
        help.
        > I have been battling ice storms and water back-ups. Yvette
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <gauvaine@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Charity,
        > > I read the Magic of Recluce back when it came out in the
        > early
        > > 1990's and loved it. I picked up the next one, which was the
        > Towers
        > > of the Sunset, I believe, and it was a storyline that took place
        a
        > > thousand years in the past. WTH!!? I think i liked it more than
        > you
        > > did, however. The next one after that skipped a few hundred years
        > > forward. His writing doesn't change and his characters are always
        > > good. He focuses on characterization and world building, mainly
        > > cultural details and governmental maneuvering and plotting by the
        > > strong to oppress the weak. Chaos vs Order. It's a good concept,
        > but
        > > i think he's beaten it to death a little bit at this point.
        > >
        > > I've read all the standard fantasy niches over the years.
        Tolkien,
        > of
        > > course. Le Guinn. McKillip. Lloyd Alexander. Terry Brooks, Feist,
        > > Eddings, Salvatore, Jordan, Tad Williams, George R.R. Martin,
        > David
        > > Gemmell, Simon Green, Glen Cook, Piers Anthony, J.K. Rowling,etc,
        > > etc. Some are good, some are middling, some are mediocre. I'm
        > finding
        > > mediocre more than the good, though, and it's frustrating.
        > >
        > > I used to be one of those people who read a book all the way
        > through,
        > > whether it was good or terribe, just so i could have the
        > > accomplishment of having finished it, hoping that it got better
        as
        > I
        > > read or feeling exhilirated when there was another one in the
        > series.
        > >
        > > I haven't felt that in a while. The last fantasy book i read,
        > which
        > > was a page turner, was Elantris by Sanderson. A bit trite in some
        > > places but the plotting and world building were excellent and the
        > > characters were very well defined. I've tried and failed to read
        > > dozens of books the last few years that i just can't find an
        > interest
        > > in finishing. I don't have time for it. I'm in graduate school,
        > work
        > > full-time, and have three kids. Who has time to read when it's
        not
        > a
        > > textbook or a picture book? Or a book on SQL, FLASH 8, or
        > Dreamweaver
        > > for that matter.
        > >
        > > I've switched to more offbeat things, trying to find something
        > that's
        > > different. There's not alot of that. you have to find it. Indie
        > > publisher's mostly. I did pick up a new Glen Cook series, Cecila
        > Dart
        > > Thornton, and a few Jack McDevitt science fiction books that are
        > > promising.
        > >
        > > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "C. M. Van Vleet"
        > > <alwaysadventuring@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I think in the last year, I've only had one instance of this.
        > The
        > > author was
        > > > L. E. Modesit and the book was The Magic of Recluce. I forced
        > > myself to
        > > > read this because of another fantasy reader's recommendation.
        By
        > > the end of
        > > > it I fell in love with the main characters - they were the only
        > > thing that
        > > > kept me reading it. I bought the next two books, thinking it
        > would
        > > > surely feature these two characters and was utterly disgusted
        to
        > > find there
        > > > wasn't a mention of either one in either of the books. In fact,
        > it
        > > > was a brand new storyline for both. I didn't make it past the
        > first
        > > ten
        > > > pages of the second book and returned them.
        > > >
        > > > However, I have had instances where I've gotten tired of a
        > series -
        > > R.A.
        > > > Salvatore, the Dragonlance books, and Anne McAffrey are
        > examples. I
        > > loved
        > > > the Dragon Rider series by McAffrey - up to a point. When she
        > > stopped moving
        > > > forward with the series and began branching out into side
        > stories
        > > about
        > > > individual characters, I completely lost interest. The other
        two
        > > series'
        > > > just kept repeating the same general plots which got very old
        > for
        > > me.
        > > >
        > > > I do have several authors that I follow regularly in the
        fantasy
        > > realm -
        > > > Terry Brooks (the Shannara series - been reading it since I was
        > a
        > > kid),
        > > > Terry Goodkind, Piers Anthony, and Sara Douglass to name a few.
        > I
        > > usually
        > > > only seek out authors that have been recommended to me by
        fellow
        > > fantasy
        > > > readers or book store employees, which might be why I don't
        have
        > a
        > > big
        > > > problem with getting books that I don't want to read or have to
        > > force myself
        > > > through. Of course, that does mean I regularly run out of
        > reading
        > > material
        > > > for a while until I can find something else.... but I'm a
        pretty
        > > picky
        > > > reader and don't like taking chances with what I read. And no
        > > matter how
        > > > much I try, some books I just can't get into - like Robert
        > Jordan's
        > > work.
        > > > He's just too long winded for me.
        > > >
        > > > One thing I have noticed is that even with that, I've learned
        of
        > > things to
        > > > avoid doing in my own writing. Terry Brooks tends to be
        somewhat
        > > repeatative
        > > > in his work because his series is so long and his following so
        > > large, he has
        > > > to make sure that if you haven't read the series in the last
        few
        > > years, you
        > > > remember where you left off. Unfortuantely for me, this tends
        to
        > be
        > > a bit
        > > > redundant as I have an extremely good memory. I think he tends
        > to
        > > overdo
        > > > that a little bit which is something I wish to avoid.
        > > >
        > > > Terry Brooks tends to use his books to spout his own viewpoints
        > on
        > > truth,
        > > > justice and morality. It's a bit annoying but eventually you
        get
        > > used to it
        > > > and just allow it.
        > > >
        > > > Sara Douglass is a relatively new author from Australia whose
        > work
        > > I love.
        > > > The only problem is it's a bit hard to come by and her series
        > isn't
        > > really
        > > > that big yet (only six books) but extremely good.
        > > >
        > > > Charity
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > On 12/11/06, jcherper <jcherper@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Matt (our illustrious leader) and I were discussing about
        > how
        > > we have
        > > > > both gotten to a point that if a book is not flowing, and we
        > are
        > > > > having to slog through it, we both give up on the book. I
        > started
        > > > > thinking about this. In the past year there are about 2 dozen
        > > books
        > > > > that I started, found unbelievably dull so I just dumped
        them.
        > > Are we
        > > > > the only ones? Do you slog through to the finish regardless,
        > or
        > > are
        > > > > you more likely to toss the book aside and read something
        > better?
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --
        > > > Charity
        > > > - As long as you're writing, you're succeeding. ~C. M. Van Vleet
        > > > - Wisdom: Truth in simple terms. ~C.M. Van Vleet
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • Caleb Palfreyman
        Hello All, I am new to the group and this is my first post. I am a big fan of fantasy and science fiction. The Lord of the Rings is my all time favorite
        Message 3 of 18 , Dec 22, 2006
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          Hello All,

          I am new to the group and this is my first post. I am a big fan of fantasy and science fiction. The Lord of the Rings is my all time favorite book. I know, not very original, but what can I say. I was a fan long before the movies came out. I've read all the typical fantasy--Jordan, Eddings, Martin, Goodkind, Brooks, etc. Recently, I just got finished with The Illiad. It was a challenging read, but I got through it. Now that I've read it, I'm glad that I did. I've decided I want to hit fantasy at its base, so I am going to try to read all of the early classical epics.

          Anyways, I look forward to being in the group.


          Caleb

          jcherper <jcherper@...> wrote:
          Matt (our illustrious leader) and I were discussing about how we have
          both gotten to a point that if a book is not flowing, and we are
          having to slog through it, we both give up on the book. I started
          thinking about this. In the past year there are about 2 dozen books
          that I started, found unbelievably dull so I just dumped them. Are we
          the only ones? Do you slog through to the finish regardless, or are
          you more likely to toss the book aside and read something better?






          Faithless is he that says farewell when the road darkens.
          J. R. R. Tolkien (1892 - 1973)
          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          http://mail.yahoo.com

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • N B
          Hi Caleb welcome to the group...as a member (though not always very active) i wish you to enjoy being a member too!:) I also like the Lord of the rings and
          Message 4 of 18 , Dec 28, 2006
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            Hi Caleb
            welcome to the group...as a member (though not always
            very active) i wish you to enjoy being a member too!:)
            I also like the Lord of the rings and Tolkien in
            general and liked it well before they even talked of
            the movie. It's not surprising; it's a great story!
            have fun in the group.
            See you soon in the dungeon

            Fairia
            --- Caleb Palfreyman <palfreyman5@...> wrote:

            > Hello All,
            >
            > I am new to the group and this is my first post.
            > I am a big fan of fantasy and science fiction. The
            > Lord of the Rings is my all time favorite book. I
            > know, not very original, but what can I say. I was
            > a fan long before the movies came out. I've read
            > all the typical fantasy--Jordan, Eddings, Martin,
            > Goodkind, Brooks, etc. Recently, I just got
            > finished with The Illiad. It was a challenging read,
            > but I got through it. Now that I've read it, I'm
            > glad that I did. I've decided I want to hit fantasy
            > at its base, so I am going to try to read all of the
            > early classical epics.
            >
            > Anyways, I look forward to being in the group.
            >
            >
            > Caleb
            >
            > jcherper <jcherper@...> wrote:
            > Matt (our illustrious leader) and I were
            > discussing about how we have
            > both gotten to a point that if a book is not
            > flowing, and we are
            > having to slog through it, we both give up on the
            > book. I started
            > thinking about this. In the past year there are
            > about 2 dozen books
            > that I started, found unbelievably dull so I just
            > dumped them. Are we
            > the only ones? Do you slog through to the finish
            > regardless, or are
            > you more likely to toss the book aside and read
            > something better?
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Faithless is he that says farewell when the road
            > darkens.
            > J. R. R. Tolkien (1892 - 1973)
            > __________________________________________________
            > Do You Yahoo!?
            > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
            > protection around
            > http://mail.yahoo.com
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been
            > removed]
            >
            >


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