Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Annoucement

Expand Messages
  • Matt
    Thanks, Harold. I read that story ages ago and couldn t ever figure out who wrote it. Here s another one for you: This story was also a Twilight Zone or Outer
    Message 1 of 18 , Mar 1 3:53 PM
      Thanks, Harold. I read that story ages ago and couldn't ever figure
      out who wrote it. Here's another one for you:

      This story was also a Twilight Zone or Outer Limits episode, so
      another golden age story. The protagonist is a Confederate soldier
      and is caught by a Union patrol and hung as a spy from a bridge. As
      he starts to kick, the beam breaks and he falls into the river and
      swims down stream and is able to get home and see his wife and
      child. However, at that moment he actually does hang and the rope
      snaps his neck. The whole story was a split second musing.

      Another one i remember is one by Ray Bradbury and some sort of
      holodeck program these kids had that involved lions and wanting to
      get rid of their abusive parent. The hologram simulation ending up
      eating the person.


      --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
      <antippas@...> wrote:
      >
      > "It's a Good Life" by Jerome Bixby, first published in the 1953
      > collection Star Science Fiction Stories No. 2. It is a haunting
      > story.
      >
      > Herod Antipas
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <gauvaine@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Does anyone remember the old, golden age story that a twilight
      > zone
      > > episode was modeled after, whereas the little boy could read
      > > everyone's thoughts and could bend reality to his will? The
      > Simpsons
      > > even did a take on it with Bart for a Halloween episode. This
      > seems
      > > akin to that.
      > >
      > > Of course, the original story, written by Harlan Ellison or Ray
      > > Bradbury or Clifford Simak or whoever it was, had the end of the
      > > world coming at the moment the boy was born. The trauma of child
      > > birth caused his powers to rip this small town out of reality or
      > > destroy the universe around this town until only the town
      existed.
      > > Everybody had to tiptoe around this kid. Technology was frozen.
      > Time
      > > stood still, pretty much.
      > >
      > > If anyone can come up with the name or author, fire away.
      > >
      > > It also reminds me of the Postman, the David Brin book, not the
      > > awful 4 hour long Kevin Costner diaster.
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <gauvaine@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Ulrich Stars In Jericho Pilot
      > > >
      > > > Skeet Ulrich (Miracles) has been tapped to star in CBS' SF
      drama
      > > pilot
      > > > Jericho, from executive producers Ridley and Tony Scott,
      > according
      > > to
      > > > The Hollywood Reporter.
      > > >
      > > > Jericho, from CBS Paramount Network TV and Scott Free
      > Productions,
      > > > chronicles the chaos that ensues in a small town that becomes
      > > isolated
      > > > from the rest of the world following a nuclear disaster, the
      > trade
      > > > paper reported.
      > > >
      > > > Ulrich will play the mayor's youngest son, who becomes an
      > unlikely
      > > > leader in the volatile situation.
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Jeff Cherpeski
      That is from an Ambrose Bierce story. I don t recall the name where it comes from though. Matt wrote: Thanks, Harold. I read that
      Message 2 of 18 , Mar 1 4:28 PM
        That is from an Ambrose Bierce story. I don't recall the name where it comes from though.



        Matt <gauvaine@...> wrote: Thanks, Harold. I read that story ages ago and couldn't ever figure
        out who wrote it. Here's another one for you:

        This story was also a Twilight Zone or Outer Limits episode, so
        another golden age story. The protagonist is a Confederate soldier
        and is caught by a Union patrol and hung as a spy from a bridge. As
        he starts to kick, the beam breaks and he falls into the river and
        swims down stream and is able to get home and see his wife and
        child. However, at that moment he actually does hang and the rope
        snaps his neck. The whole story was a split second musing.

        Another one i remember is one by Ray Bradbury and some sort of
        holodeck program these kids had that involved lions and wanting to
        get rid of their abusive parent. The hologram simulation ending up
        eating the person.


        --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
        <antippas@...> wrote:
        >
        > "It's a Good Life" by Jerome Bixby, first published in the 1953
        > collection Star Science Fiction Stories No. 2. It is a haunting
        > story.
        >
        > Herod Antipas
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <gauvaine@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Does anyone remember the old, golden age story that a twilight
        > zone
        > > episode was modeled after, whereas the little boy could read
        > > everyone's thoughts and could bend reality to his will? The
        > Simpsons
        > > even did a take on it with Bart for a Halloween episode. This
        > seems
        > > akin to that.
        > >
        > > Of course, the original story, written by Harlan Ellison or Ray
        > > Bradbury or Clifford Simak or whoever it was, had the end of the
        > > world coming at the moment the boy was born. The trauma of child
        > > birth caused his powers to rip this small town out of reality or
        > > destroy the universe around this town until only the town
        existed.
        > > Everybody had to tiptoe around this kid. Technology was frozen.
        > Time
        > > stood still, pretty much.
        > >
        > > If anyone can come up with the name or author, fire away.
        > >
        > > It also reminds me of the Postman, the David Brin book, not the
        > > awful 4 hour long Kevin Costner diaster.
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <gauvaine@>
        > > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Ulrich Stars In Jericho Pilot
        > > >
        > > > Skeet Ulrich (Miracles) has been tapped to star in CBS' SF
        drama
        > > pilot
        > > > Jericho, from executive producers Ridley and Tony Scott,
        > according
        > > to
        > > > The Hollywood Reporter.
        > > >
        > > > Jericho, from CBS Paramount Network TV and Scott Free
        > Productions,
        > > > chronicles the chaos that ensues in a small town that becomes
        > > isolated
        > > > from the rest of the world following a nuclear disaster, the
        > trade
        > > > paper reported.
        > > >
        > > > Ulrich will play the mayor's youngest son, who becomes an
        > unlikely
        > > > leader in the volatile situation.
        > > >
        > >
        >






        ---------------------------------
        YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


        Visit your group "fantasyfictiondungeon" on the web.

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        fantasyfictiondungeon-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


        ---------------------------------





        ---------------------------------
        Yahoo! Mail
        Bring photos to life! New PhotoMail makes sharing a breeze.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Matt
        An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge? Does that sound familiar? ... where it comes from though. ... ages ago and couldn t ever figure ... soldier ... As ... and
        Message 3 of 18 , Mar 2 9:27 AM
          An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge? Does that sound familiar?



          --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Cherpeski
          <jcherper@...> wrote:
          >
          > That is from an Ambrose Bierce story. I don't recall the name
          where it comes from though.
          >
          >
          >
          > Matt <gauvaine@...> wrote: Thanks, Harold. I read that story
          ages ago and couldn't ever figure
          > out who wrote it. Here's another one for you:
          >
          > This story was also a Twilight Zone or Outer Limits episode, so
          > another golden age story. The protagonist is a Confederate
          soldier
          > and is caught by a Union patrol and hung as a spy from a bridge.
          As
          > he starts to kick, the beam breaks and he falls into the river
          and
          > swims down stream and is able to get home and see his wife and
          > child. However, at that moment he actually does hang and the rope
          > snaps his neck. The whole story was a split second musing.
          >
          > Another one i remember is one by Ray Bradbury and some sort of
          > holodeck program these kids had that involved lions and wanting
          to
          > get rid of their abusive parent. The hologram simulation ending
          up
          > eating the person.
          >
          >
          > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
          > <antippas@> wrote:
          > >
          > > "It's a Good Life" by Jerome Bixby, first published in the
          1953
          > > collection Star Science Fiction Stories No. 2. It is a haunting
          > > story.
          > >
          > > Herod Antipas
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt"
          <gauvaine@>
          > > wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Does anyone remember the old, golden age story that a
          twilight
          > > zone
          > > > episode was modeled after, whereas the little boy could read
          > > > everyone's thoughts and could bend reality to his will? The
          > > Simpsons
          > > > even did a take on it with Bart for a Halloween episode. This
          > > seems
          > > > akin to that.
          > > >
          > > > Of course, the original story, written by Harlan Ellison or
          Ray
          > > > Bradbury or Clifford Simak or whoever it was, had the end of
          the
          > > > world coming at the moment the boy was born. The trauma of
          child
          > > > birth caused his powers to rip this small town out of reality
          or
          > > > destroy the universe around this town until only the town
          > existed.
          > > > Everybody had to tiptoe around this kid. Technology was
          frozen.
          > > Time
          > > > stood still, pretty much.
          > > >
          > > > If anyone can come up with the name or author, fire away.
          > > >
          > > > It also reminds me of the Postman, the David Brin book, not
          the
          > > > awful 4 hour long Kevin Costner diaster.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt"
          <gauvaine@>
          > > > wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > Ulrich Stars In Jericho Pilot
          > > > >
          > > > > Skeet Ulrich (Miracles) has been tapped to star in CBS' SF
          > drama
          > > > pilot
          > > > > Jericho, from executive producers Ridley and Tony Scott,
          > > according
          > > > to
          > > > > The Hollywood Reporter.
          > > > >
          > > > > Jericho, from CBS Paramount Network TV and Scott Free
          > > Productions,
          > > > > chronicles the chaos that ensues in a small town that
          becomes
          > > > isolated
          > > > > from the rest of the world following a nuclear disaster,
          the
          > > trade
          > > > > paper reported.
          > > > >
          > > > > Ulrich will play the mayor's youngest son, who becomes an
          > > unlikely
          > > > > leader in the volatile situation.
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
          >
          >
          > Visit your group "fantasyfictiondungeon" on the web.
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > fantasyfictiondungeon-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
          Service.
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Yahoo! Mail
          > Bring photos to life! New PhotoMail makes sharing a breeze.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Jeff Cherpeski
          That is the short story alright. Matt wrote: An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge? Does that sound familiar? ... where it comes from though.
          Message 4 of 18 , Mar 2 9:34 AM
            That is the short story alright.

            Matt <gauvaine@...> wrote:
            An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge? Does that sound familiar?



            --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Cherpeski
            <jcherper@...> wrote:
            >
            > That is from an Ambrose Bierce story. I don't recall the name
            where it comes from though.
            >
            >
            >
            > Matt <gauvaine@...> wrote: Thanks, Harold. I read that story
            ages ago and couldn't ever figure
            > out who wrote it. Here's another one for you:
            >
            > This story was also a Twilight Zone or Outer Limits episode, so
            > another golden age story. The protagonist is a Confederate
            soldier
            > and is caught by a Union patrol and hung as a spy from a bridge.
            As
            > he starts to kick, the beam breaks and he falls into the river
            and
            > swims down stream and is able to get home and see his wife and
            > child. However, at that moment he actually does hang and the rope
            > snaps his neck. The whole story was a split second musing.
            >
            > Another one i remember is one by Ray Bradbury and some sort of
            > holodeck program these kids had that involved lions and wanting
            to
            > get rid of their abusive parent. The hologram simulation ending
            up
            > eating the person.
            >
            >
            > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
            > <antippas@> wrote:
            > >
            > > "It's a Good Life" by Jerome Bixby, first published in the
            1953
            > > collection Star Science Fiction Stories No. 2. It is a haunting
            > > story.
            > >
            > > Herod Antipas
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt"
            <gauvaine@>
            > > wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Does anyone remember the old, golden age story that a
            twilight
            > > zone
            > > > episode was modeled after, whereas the little boy could read
            > > > everyone's thoughts and could bend reality to his will? The
            > > Simpsons
            > > > even did a take on it with Bart for a Halloween episode. This
            > > seems
            > > > akin to that.
            > > >
            > > > Of course, the original story, written by Harlan Ellison or
            Ray
            > > > Bradbury or Clifford Simak or whoever it was, had the end of
            the
            > > > world coming at the moment the boy was born. The trauma of
            child
            > > > birth caused his powers to rip this small town out of reality
            or
            > > > destroy the universe around this town until only the town
            > existed.
            > > > Everybody had to tiptoe around this kid. Technology was
            frozen.
            > > Time
            > > > stood still, pretty much.
            > > >
            > > > If anyone can come up with the name or author, fire away.
            > > >
            > > > It also reminds me of the Postman, the David Brin book, not
            the
            > > > awful 4 hour long Kevin Costner diaster.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt"
            <gauvaine@>
            > > > wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > Ulrich Stars In Jericho Pilot
            > > > >
            > > > > Skeet Ulrich (Miracles) has been tapped to star in CBS' SF
            > drama
            > > > pilot
            > > > > Jericho, from executive producers Ridley and Tony Scott,
            > > according
            > > > to
            > > > > The Hollywood Reporter.
            > > > >
            > > > > Jericho, from CBS Paramount Network TV and Scott Free
            > > Productions,
            > > > > chronicles the chaos that ensues in a small town that
            becomes
            > > > isolated
            > > > > from the rest of the world following a nuclear disaster,
            the
            > > trade
            > > > > paper reported.
            > > > >
            > > > > Ulrich will play the mayor's youngest son, who becomes an
            > > unlikely
            > > > > leader in the volatile situation.
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
            >
            >
            > Visit your group "fantasyfictiondungeon" on the web.
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > fantasyfictiondungeon-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
            Service.
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Yahoo! Mail
            > Bring photos to life! New PhotoMail makes sharing a breeze.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >







            SPONSORED LINKS
            Fantasy science fiction magazine Fantasy science fiction Science fiction movies Fantasy game Writing science fiction Science fiction

            ---------------------------------
            YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


            Visit your group "fantasyfictiondungeon" on the web.

            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            fantasyfictiondungeon-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


            ---------------------------------





            ---------------------------------
            Relax. Yahoo! Mail virus scanning helps detect nasty viruses!

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Herod Antipas
            ... If I remember correctly, the protagonist s name in the story was Payton Farquhar. I always liked that name. An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge is the
            Message 5 of 18 , Mar 2 3:10 PM
              >
              > That is the short story alright.
              >
              > Matt <gauvaine@...> wrote:
              > An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge? Does that sound familiar?
              >
              >

              If I remember correctly, the protagonist's name in the story was
              Payton Farquhar. I always liked that name. An Occurence at Owl
              Creek Bridge is the classic story of it's type, used to such great
              effect in movies like Brazil, and Jacob's Ladder.

              The story by Bradbury is called "The Veldt"

              http://www.veddma.com/veddma/Veldt.htm

              it is quoted in its entirety on this website. I can;t help it. I
              just have that kind of memory.
            • Matt
              That s the one. You re a font of golden age knowlege Harold. I ll see what else i can come up with.
              Message 6 of 18 , Mar 2 3:44 PM
                That's the one. You're a font of golden age knowlege Harold. I'll
                see what else i can come up with.

                --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
                <antippas@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > >
                > > That is the short story alright.
                > >
                > > Matt <gauvaine@> wrote:
                > > An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge? Does that sound familiar?
                > >
                > >
                >
                > If I remember correctly, the protagonist's name in the story was
                > Payton Farquhar. I always liked that name. An Occurence at Owl
                > Creek Bridge is the classic story of it's type, used to such great
                > effect in movies like Brazil, and Jacob's Ladder.
                >
                > The story by Bradbury is called "The Veldt"
                >
                > http://www.veddma.com/veddma/Veldt.htm
                >
                > it is quoted in its entirety on this website. I can;t help it. I
                > just have that kind of memory.
                >
              • Matt
                Here s another one: Three men are in a cave after a nuclear war, and the one man that lives in the cave has copies of the Bible, Shakespeare, and Dante, in his
                Message 7 of 18 , Mar 2 3:53 PM
                  Here's another one:

                  Three men are in a cave after a nuclear war, and the one man that
                  lives in the cave has copies of the Bible, Shakespeare, and Dante,
                  in his cave, as well as phonograph with a few records. It's what is
                  left of civilization, pretty much. What of the other men tries to
                  kill him at the end of the story, to take the phonograph.

                  There's another story where there's a war in the far future where
                  technology has made things so brutal and violent that a soldier's
                  life expectancy is nil, practically. There are mines that pop up and
                  chase you until they wrap around you and blow your legs off. There
                  are particle beams. Homing rockets. One particular soldier gets
                  caught in an explosion and sent to the past. He has video and audio
                  of his platoon trying to reach some objective. Scientists dissect
                  the video and start broadcasting it the public, who demand peace in
                  order to change the future.

                  Two people lie separated by an unending wall that goes forever in
                  both directions. There's a crack in the wall so they can hear and
                  talk to each other. They fall in love just from talking to each
                  other, day after day, week after week. They try to dig through the
                  wall. After months and years, there's finally enough room to fit
                  through. They see each other and then go their separate ways, the
                  reality not living up to the expectation and longing.



                  --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
                  <antippas@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > >
                  > > That is the short story alright.
                  > >
                  > > Matt <gauvaine@> wrote:
                  > > An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge? Does that sound familiar?
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > If I remember correctly, the protagonist's name in the story was
                  > Payton Farquhar. I always liked that name. An Occurence at Owl
                  > Creek Bridge is the classic story of it's type, used to such great
                  > effect in movies like Brazil, and Jacob's Ladder.
                  >
                  > The story by Bradbury is called "The Veldt"
                  >
                  > http://www.veddma.com/veddma/Veldt.htm
                  >
                  > it is quoted in its entirety on this website. I can;t help it. I
                  > just have that kind of memory.
                  >
                • jcherper
                  ... Is this the one that ends with The Aristocrats?
                  Message 8 of 18 , Mar 2 3:59 PM
                    >>>Three men are in a cave after a nuclear war,


                    Is this the one that ends with "The Aristocrats?"
                  • Herod Antipas
                    Well, I must say that none of these gave me an immediate recollection, but a little bit of googling produced this: I ll see what I can do about the other two.
                    Message 9 of 18 , Mar 2 5:11 PM
                      Well, I must say that none of these gave me an immediate
                      recollection, but a little bit of googling produced this:

                      I'll see what I can do about the other two.

                      The Portable Phonograph
                      by
                      Walter Van Tilburg Clark

                      "The Portable Phonograph," in Stegner, Wallace; Richard Scowcroft,
                      Boris Ilyin, eds. The Writer's Art: A Collection of Short Stories.
                      Boston: D. C. Heath, 1950; pp. 258-264. [Available: Getchell
                      Library, Special Collections: PZ 1 .S82 Wr]



                      Walter Van Tilburg Clark's short story, "The Portable
                      Phonograph", is a tale about the last survivors in the
                      world after the total destruction of a war. The author
                      gives clues and hints of this throughout the beginning by
                      writing in a narrative voice and describing the scene in
                      dark war-like terms. The characters are then introduced as
                      a group of men huddled around a fire. The older of the men,
                      Doctor Jenkins, is the leader and his character is full of
                      personality that can be analyzed by the reader. He is the
                      owner of the shelter that they meet in. This paper will
                      point out the different aspects of the old man in this
                      story and state conclusions that can be drawn from them.

                      The men in this story are obviously amused by the slightest
                      little things. They occupy themselves through book readings
                      from a collection that one man has. Each of the men
                      contributes to the group and together they endure a time of
                      devastation by entertaining each other. The older man has a
                      record player that he brings out once a week for the
                      listening pleasure of the group. He is very proud of this
                      treasure. It has sustained hard times just as he has and he
                      limits his use of it to make it last. He owns only three
                      steel needles and he gets one out to use because on this
                      particular occasion, there is a musician visitor with them.
                      The other men act as excited as children. They listen to
                      the record and then leave the doctor's house.

                      Doctor Jenkins is nervous and suspicious at the end of the
                      story when the other men leave. "With nervous hands he
                      lowered the piece of canvas which served as his door, and
                      pegged it at the bottom. Then quickly quietly, looking at
                      the piece of canvas frequently, he slipped the records in
                      the case..." (Clark, page 241). He feels that "everything
                      he has" is at risk because of greed that hard times like
                      these could produce in the other men. He is secure and
                      comfortable with the things that he has and he doesn't
                      trust the others. He then hides his treasures away in a
                      safe place after they leave. As he gets into his bed he
                      feels the "comfortable piece of lead pipe" with his hand.
                      The doctor has no problem resorting to violence and that
                      actually makes him feel more comfortable. The greed that
                      the doctor sees in the others is a reflection of the
                      feelings and thoughts that he himself has. His views are
                      distorted and he sees himself in the men. He invites them
                      back every week, it seems, so it is quite possible that his
                      possessions do not make him as happy as the company he
                      receives every week.

                      The contrast between the happiness that the men get from
                      his musical device and the lack of fulfillment this
                      provides for him is interesting. In the world that this
                      story describes, the reader expects the doctor to be happy
                      with all that he has. As the story unfolds, you gain an
                      understanding of the feelings behind his possessions.
                      Doctor Jenkins is a normal character and his feelings are
                      presented in a real manner. The reader can conclude that
                      his personality is not unlike anyone else. What he sees is
                      influenced by the way he is and how he feels. He views
                      things in a way that ultimately makes his feelings of
                      suspicion and greed stronger, therefore never breaking the
                      cycle of how he judges those around him.


                      --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <gauvaine@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > Here's another one:
                      >
                      > Three men are in a cave after a nuclear war, and the one man that
                      > lives in the cave has copies of the Bible, Shakespeare, and Dante,
                      > in his cave, as well as phonograph with a few records. It's what
                      is
                      > left of civilization, pretty much. What of the other men tries to
                      > kill him at the end of the story, to take the phonograph.
                      >
                      > There's another story where there's a war in the far future where
                      > technology has made things so brutal and violent that a soldier's
                      > life expectancy is nil, practically. There are mines that pop up
                      and
                      > chase you until they wrap around you and blow your legs off. There
                      > are particle beams. Homing rockets. One particular soldier gets
                      > caught in an explosion and sent to the past. He has video and
                      audio
                      > of his platoon trying to reach some objective. Scientists dissect
                      > the video and start broadcasting it the public, who demand peace
                      in
                      > order to change the future.
                      >
                      > Two people lie separated by an unending wall that goes forever in
                      > both directions. There's a crack in the wall so they can hear and
                      > talk to each other. They fall in love just from talking to each
                      > other, day after day, week after week. They try to dig through the
                      > wall. After months and years, there's finally enough room to fit
                      > through. They see each other and then go their separate ways, the
                      > reality not living up to the expectation and longing.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
                      > <antippas@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > >
                      > > > That is the short story alright.
                      > > >
                      > > > Matt <gauvaine@> wrote:
                      > > > An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge? Does that sound familiar?
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > > If I remember correctly, the protagonist's name in the story was
                      > > Payton Farquhar. I always liked that name. An Occurence at Owl
                      > > Creek Bridge is the classic story of it's type, used to such
                      great
                      > > effect in movies like Brazil, and Jacob's Ladder.
                      > >
                      > > The story by Bradbury is called "The Veldt"
                      > >
                      > > http://www.veddma.com/veddma/Veldt.htm
                      > >
                      > > it is quoted in its entirety on this website. I can;t help it.
                      I
                      > > just have that kind of memory.
                      > >
                      >
                    • Herod Antipas
                      I think you ve got hold of Harlan Ellison s 1957 story, Soldier . Here is a review of the Outer Limits episode made from it from the amaxon website: Harlan
                      Message 10 of 18 , Mar 2 5:29 PM
                        I think you've got hold of Harlan Ellison's 1957 story, "Soldier".
                        Here is a review of the Outer Limits episode made from it from the
                        amaxon website:


                        Harlan Ellison's story of a super "Solider" from the future,
                        September 2, 2002
                        Reviewer: Lawrance M. Bernabo (The Zenith City: Duluth, MN United
                        States) - See all my reviews

                        Having crafted one of the very best episodse of "The Outer Limits"
                        with "The Demon with the Glass Hand," Harlan Ellison comes up with
                        another strong script with "Soldier," adapted from a short story. In
                        fact, if you get the chance to read the 1957 short story, which is a
                        rather crudely drawn anti-war polemic, then you will be even more
                        impressed with the story's refinement in this script. Qarlo (Michael
                        Ansara) is a human killing machine who is catapulted from the future
                        to the "present" during a battle with an enemy (who is stuck in
                        between time--for the time being...). Kagan (Lloyd Nolan), a
                        language expert, is assigned to crack Qarlo's language. Kagan
                        succeeds, at which point the story takes an interesting but strange
                        turn, as Kagan brings the super soldier from the future home to meet
                        the wife and kids. The scene does develop some very interesting
                        aspects of Qarlo's personality and story, but it is rather
                        unbelievable that the government would let a time traveler go home
                        with a linguist for dinner. Still, "The Solider" is a very
                        interesting time travel story and the performances by Nolan and
                        especially Ansara goes a long way to make up for that one gapping
                        hole in the script. It is on the strength of those performances, a
                        common finding with episodes scripted by Ellison I should point out,
                        that I decided to round up instead of down with this 4.5 star
                        episode. The strange mix of violence and optimism actually makes the
                        story work, at least for me. As everyone has mentioned, there are
                        some strong similarities between "Solider" and "Terminator." So much
                        so that Ellison won a suit against James Cameron (you know,
                        that "Titanic" movie Cameron made was not an original story either).
                        Actually, I think "Soldier" owes something to the Ghost of Christmas
                        Yet to Come from Dickens's "A Christmas Carol." "Soldier," Episode
                        33 of "The Outer Limits," was directed by Gerd Oswald and first
                        aired on September 19, 1964, which I believe makes it the first
                        episode of the show's second season.


                        --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <gauvaine@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > Here's another one:
                        >
                        > Three men are in a cave after a nuclear war, and the one man that
                        > lives in the cave has copies of the Bible, Shakespeare, and Dante,
                        > in his cave, as well as phonograph with a few records. It's what
                        is
                        > left of civilization, pretty much. What of the other men tries to
                        > kill him at the end of the story, to take the phonograph.
                        >
                        > There's another story where there's a war in the far future where
                        > technology has made things so brutal and violent that a soldier's
                        > life expectancy is nil, practically. There are mines that pop up
                        and
                        > chase you until they wrap around you and blow your legs off. There
                        > are particle beams. Homing rockets. One particular soldier gets
                        > caught in an explosion and sent to the past. He has video and
                        audio
                        > of his platoon trying to reach some objective. Scientists dissect
                        > the video and start broadcasting it the public, who demand peace
                        in
                        > order to change the future.
                        >
                        > Two people lie separated by an unending wall that goes forever in
                        > both directions. There's a crack in the wall so they can hear and
                        > talk to each other. They fall in love just from talking to each
                        > other, day after day, week after week. They try to dig through the
                        > wall. After months and years, there's finally enough room to fit
                        > through. They see each other and then go their separate ways, the
                        > reality not living up to the expectation and longing.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
                        > <antippas@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > >
                        > > > That is the short story alright.
                        > > >
                        > > > Matt <gauvaine@> wrote:
                        > > > An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge? Does that sound familiar?
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > > If I remember correctly, the protagonist's name in the story was
                        > > Payton Farquhar. I always liked that name. An Occurence at Owl
                        > > Creek Bridge is the classic story of it's type, used to such
                        great
                        > > effect in movies like Brazil, and Jacob's Ladder.
                        > >
                        > > The story by Bradbury is called "The Veldt"
                        > >
                        > > http://www.veddma.com/veddma/Veldt.htm
                        > >
                        > > it is quoted in its entirety on this website. I can;t help it.
                        I
                        > > just have that kind of memory.
                        > >
                        >
                      • Herod Antipas
                        I wonder if the thrid story could be Theodore COgwell s The Wall around the World HEre are a few descritpitons: The Wall Around the World by Theodore R
                        Message 11 of 18 , Mar 2 5:52 PM
                          I wonder if the thrid story could be Theodore COgwell's "The Wall
                          around the World" HEre are a few descritpitons:

                          "The Wall Around the World" by Theodore R
                          Cogswell, is an interesting offering, since in
                          many respects it bears a startling resemblance
                          to the Harry Potter books. But not too
                          much of a resemblance. :-) I liked this one.
                          The setting was intriguing, and the twist at the
                          end particularly satisfying.

                          I can't find a good synopsis but it won or was nominated for a hugo
                          and seems to have prefigured Harry Potter and has a protagonist who
                          is 14 when the story begins. any of that sound familiar?


                          --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <gauvaine@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > Here's another one:
                          >
                          > Three men are in a cave after a nuclear war, and the one man that
                          > lives in the cave has copies of the Bible, Shakespeare, and Dante,
                          > in his cave, as well as phonograph with a few records. It's what
                          is
                          > left of civilization, pretty much. What of the other men tries to
                          > kill him at the end of the story, to take the phonograph.
                          >
                          > There's another story where there's a war in the far future where
                          > technology has made things so brutal and violent that a soldier's
                          > life expectancy is nil, practically. There are mines that pop up
                          and
                          > chase you until they wrap around you and blow your legs off. There
                          > are particle beams. Homing rockets. One particular soldier gets
                          > caught in an explosion and sent to the past. He has video and
                          audio
                          > of his platoon trying to reach some objective. Scientists dissect
                          > the video and start broadcasting it the public, who demand peace
                          in
                          > order to change the future.
                          >
                          > Two people lie separated by an unending wall that goes forever in
                          > both directions. There's a crack in the wall so they can hear and
                          > talk to each other. They fall in love just from talking to each
                          > other, day after day, week after week. They try to dig through the
                          > wall. After months and years, there's finally enough room to fit
                          > through. They see each other and then go their separate ways, the
                          > reality not living up to the expectation and longing.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
                          > <antippas@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > >
                          > > > That is the short story alright.
                          > > >
                          > > > Matt <gauvaine@> wrote:
                          > > > An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge? Does that sound familiar?
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          > > If I remember correctly, the protagonist's name in the story was
                          > > Payton Farquhar. I always liked that name. An Occurence at Owl
                          > > Creek Bridge is the classic story of it's type, used to such
                          great
                          > > effect in movies like Brazil, and Jacob's Ladder.
                          > >
                          > > The story by Bradbury is called "The Veldt"
                          > >
                          > > http://www.veddma.com/veddma/Veldt.htm
                          > >
                          > > it is quoted in its entirety on this website. I can;t help it.
                          I
                          > > just have that kind of memory.
                          > >
                          >
                        • Matt
                          That s the one. I remember the last line being the shadow at the door and him tightening his grip on his lead pipe. That story has always stuck with me. Even
                          Message 12 of 18 , Mar 3 10:13 AM
                            That's the one. I remember the last line being the shadow at the
                            door and him tightening his grip on his lead pipe. That story has
                            always stuck with me. Even with everyone dead, our cities destroyed,
                            civilization decimated, with a chance to either start over anew or
                            have everything we knew disappear forever, we get tangled in the
                            basic compulsions of men, being that they want what others have and
                            they are always afraid of the motivations of those around them. We
                            don't trust people and rightly so.

                            So with the world dead we still have petty machinations and our
                            desire for "stuff" is never extinguished; there's still sin, murder,
                            greed, bitterness, desire, and hope, all cemented into this story.

                            --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
                            <antippas@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Well, I must say that none of these gave me an immediate
                            > recollection, but a little bit of googling produced this:
                            >
                            > I'll see what I can do about the other two.
                            >
                            > The Portable Phonograph
                            > by
                            > Walter Van Tilburg Clark
                            >
                            > "The Portable Phonograph," in Stegner, Wallace; Richard Scowcroft,
                            > Boris Ilyin, eds. The Writer's Art: A Collection of Short Stories.
                            > Boston: D. C. Heath, 1950; pp. 258-264. [Available: Getchell
                            > Library, Special Collections: PZ 1 .S82 Wr]
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Walter Van Tilburg Clark's short story, "The Portable
                            > Phonograph", is a tale about the last survivors in the
                            > world after the total destruction of a war. The author
                            > gives clues and hints of this throughout the beginning by
                            > writing in a narrative voice and describing the scene in
                            > dark war-like terms. The characters are then introduced as
                            > a group of men huddled around a fire. The older of the men,
                            > Doctor Jenkins, is the leader and his character is full of
                            > personality that can be analyzed by the reader. He is the
                            > owner of the shelter that they meet in. This paper will
                            > point out the different aspects of the old man in this
                            > story and state conclusions that can be drawn from them.
                            >
                            > The men in this story are obviously amused by the slightest
                            > little things. They occupy themselves through book readings
                            > from a collection that one man has. Each of the men
                            > contributes to the group and together they endure a time of
                            > devastation by entertaining each other. The older man has a
                            > record player that he brings out once a week for the
                            > listening pleasure of the group. He is very proud of this
                            > treasure. It has sustained hard times just as he has and he
                            > limits his use of it to make it last. He owns only three
                            > steel needles and he gets one out to use because on this
                            > particular occasion, there is a musician visitor with them.
                            > The other men act as excited as children. They listen to
                            > the record and then leave the doctor's house.
                            >
                            > Doctor Jenkins is nervous and suspicious at the end of the
                            > story when the other men leave. "With nervous hands he
                            > lowered the piece of canvas which served as his door, and
                            > pegged it at the bottom. Then quickly quietly, looking at
                            > the piece of canvas frequently, he slipped the records in
                            > the case..." (Clark, page 241). He feels that "everything
                            > he has" is at risk because of greed that hard times like
                            > these could produce in the other men. He is secure and
                            > comfortable with the things that he has and he doesn't
                            > trust the others. He then hides his treasures away in a
                            > safe place after they leave. As he gets into his bed he
                            > feels the "comfortable piece of lead pipe" with his hand.
                            > The doctor has no problem resorting to violence and that
                            > actually makes him feel more comfortable. The greed that
                            > the doctor sees in the others is a reflection of the
                            > feelings and thoughts that he himself has. His views are
                            > distorted and he sees himself in the men. He invites them
                            > back every week, it seems, so it is quite possible that his
                            > possessions do not make him as happy as the company he
                            > receives every week.
                            >
                            > The contrast between the happiness that the men get from
                            > his musical device and the lack of fulfillment this
                            > provides for him is interesting. In the world that this
                            > story describes, the reader expects the doctor to be happy
                            > with all that he has. As the story unfolds, you gain an
                            > understanding of the feelings behind his possessions.
                            > Doctor Jenkins is a normal character and his feelings are
                            > presented in a real manner. The reader can conclude that
                            > his personality is not unlike anyone else. What he sees is
                            > influenced by the way he is and how he feels. He views
                            > things in a way that ultimately makes his feelings of
                            > suspicion and greed stronger, therefore never breaking the
                            > cycle of how he judges those around him.
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <gauvaine@>
                            > wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Here's another one:
                            > >
                            > > Three men are in a cave after a nuclear war, and the one man
                            that
                            > > lives in the cave has copies of the Bible, Shakespeare, and
                            Dante,
                            > > in his cave, as well as phonograph with a few records. It's what
                            > is
                            > > left of civilization, pretty much. What of the other men tries
                            to
                            > > kill him at the end of the story, to take the phonograph.
                            > >
                            > > There's another story where there's a war in the far future
                            where
                            > > technology has made things so brutal and violent that a
                            soldier's
                            > > life expectancy is nil, practically. There are mines that pop up
                            > and
                            > > chase you until they wrap around you and blow your legs off.
                            There
                            > > are particle beams. Homing rockets. One particular soldier gets
                            > > caught in an explosion and sent to the past. He has video and
                            > audio
                            > > of his platoon trying to reach some objective. Scientists
                            dissect
                            > > the video and start broadcasting it the public, who demand peace
                            > in
                            > > order to change the future.
                            > >
                            > > Two people lie separated by an unending wall that goes forever
                            in
                            > > both directions. There's a crack in the wall so they can hear
                            and
                            > > talk to each other. They fall in love just from talking to each
                            > > other, day after day, week after week. They try to dig through
                            the
                            > > wall. After months and years, there's finally enough room to fit
                            > > through. They see each other and then go their separate ways,
                            the
                            > > reality not living up to the expectation and longing.
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
                            > > <antippas@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > That is the short story alright.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Matt <gauvaine@> wrote:
                            > > > > An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge? Does that sound familiar?
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > If I remember correctly, the protagonist's name in the story
                            was
                            > > > Payton Farquhar. I always liked that name. An Occurence at
                            Owl
                            > > > Creek Bridge is the classic story of it's type, used to such
                            > great
                            > > > effect in movies like Brazil, and Jacob's Ladder.
                            > > >
                            > > > The story by Bradbury is called "The Veldt"
                            > > >
                            > > > http://www.veddma.com/veddma/Veldt.htm
                            > > >
                            > > > it is quoted in its entirety on this website. I can;t help
                            it.
                            > I
                            > > > just have that kind of memory.
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • Matt
                            That s the one. I just remember reading the short story and being disturbed by the violence. Soldiers were just fresh meat being tossed to the mechanical
                            Message 13 of 18 , Mar 3 10:17 AM
                              That's the one. I just remember reading the short story and being
                              disturbed by the violence. Soldiers were just fresh meat being
                              tossed to the mechanical monstrosities invented to wage war. It was
                              like Terminator in the respect that the WorldNet computers had
                              produced weapon after weapon to obliterate meatbags in the most
                              efficient way possible.

                              --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
                              <antippas@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I think you've got hold of Harlan Ellison's 1957
                              story, "Soldier".
                              > Here is a review of the Outer Limits episode made from it from the
                              > amaxon website:
                              >
                              >
                              > Harlan Ellison's story of a super "Solider" from the future,
                              > September 2, 2002
                              > Reviewer: Lawrance M. Bernabo (The Zenith City: Duluth, MN United
                              > States) - See all my reviews
                              >
                              > Having crafted one of the very best episodse of "The Outer Limits"
                              > with "The Demon with the Glass Hand," Harlan Ellison comes up with
                              > another strong script with "Soldier," adapted from a short story.
                              In
                              > fact, if you get the chance to read the 1957 short story, which is
                              a
                              > rather crudely drawn anti-war polemic, then you will be even more
                              > impressed with the story's refinement in this script. Qarlo
                              (Michael
                              > Ansara) is a human killing machine who is catapulted from the
                              future
                              > to the "present" during a battle with an enemy (who is stuck in
                              > between time--for the time being...). Kagan (Lloyd Nolan), a
                              > language expert, is assigned to crack Qarlo's language. Kagan
                              > succeeds, at which point the story takes an interesting but
                              strange
                              > turn, as Kagan brings the super soldier from the future home to
                              meet
                              > the wife and kids. The scene does develop some very interesting
                              > aspects of Qarlo's personality and story, but it is rather
                              > unbelievable that the government would let a time traveler go home
                              > with a linguist for dinner. Still, "The Solider" is a very
                              > interesting time travel story and the performances by Nolan and
                              > especially Ansara goes a long way to make up for that one gapping
                              > hole in the script. It is on the strength of those performances, a
                              > common finding with episodes scripted by Ellison I should point
                              out,
                              > that I decided to round up instead of down with this 4.5 star
                              > episode. The strange mix of violence and optimism actually makes
                              the
                              > story work, at least for me. As everyone has mentioned, there are
                              > some strong similarities between "Solider" and "Terminator." So
                              much
                              > so that Ellison won a suit against James Cameron (you know,
                              > that "Titanic" movie Cameron made was not an original story
                              either).
                              > Actually, I think "Soldier" owes something to the Ghost of
                              Christmas
                              > Yet to Come from Dickens's "A Christmas Carol." "Soldier," Episode
                              > 33 of "The Outer Limits," was directed by Gerd Oswald and first
                              > aired on September 19, 1964, which I believe makes it the first
                              > episode of the show's second season.
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <gauvaine@>
                              > wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Here's another one:
                              > >
                              > > Three men are in a cave after a nuclear war, and the one man
                              that
                              > > lives in the cave has copies of the Bible, Shakespeare, and
                              Dante,
                              > > in his cave, as well as phonograph with a few records. It's what
                              > is
                              > > left of civilization, pretty much. What of the other men tries
                              to
                              > > kill him at the end of the story, to take the phonograph.
                              > >
                              > > There's another story where there's a war in the far future
                              where
                              > > technology has made things so brutal and violent that a
                              soldier's
                              > > life expectancy is nil, practically. There are mines that pop up
                              > and
                              > > chase you until they wrap around you and blow your legs off.
                              There
                              > > are particle beams. Homing rockets. One particular soldier gets
                              > > caught in an explosion and sent to the past. He has video and
                              > audio
                              > > of his platoon trying to reach some objective. Scientists
                              dissect
                              > > the video and start broadcasting it the public, who demand peace
                              > in
                              > > order to change the future.
                              > >
                              > > Two people lie separated by an unending wall that goes forever
                              in
                              > > both directions. There's a crack in the wall so they can hear
                              and
                              > > talk to each other. They fall in love just from talking to each
                              > > other, day after day, week after week. They try to dig through
                              the
                              > > wall. After months and years, there's finally enough room to fit
                              > > through. They see each other and then go their separate ways,
                              the
                              > > reality not living up to the expectation and longing.
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
                              > > <antippas@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > > > That is the short story alright.
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Matt <gauvaine@> wrote:
                              > > > > An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge? Does that sound familiar?
                              > > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > >
                              > > > If I remember correctly, the protagonist's name in the story
                              was
                              > > > Payton Farquhar. I always liked that name. An Occurence at
                              Owl
                              > > > Creek Bridge is the classic story of it's type, used to such
                              > great
                              > > > effect in movies like Brazil, and Jacob's Ladder.
                              > > >
                              > > > The story by Bradbury is called "The Veldt"
                              > > >
                              > > > http://www.veddma.com/veddma/Veldt.htm
                              > > >
                              > > > it is quoted in its entirety on this website. I can;t help
                              it.
                              > I
                              > > > just have that kind of memory.
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • Matt
                              From what i gather, it was a pretty old story. I read it in 1987 in a high school language arts class centered on genre material. Too bad you can t keep
                              Message 14 of 18 , Mar 3 10:19 AM
                                From what i gather, it was a pretty old story. I read it in 1987 in
                                a high school language arts class centered on genre material. Too
                                bad you can't keep textbooks from school, unlike college.

                                --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
                                <antippas@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I wonder if the thrid story could be Theodore COgwell's "The Wall
                                > around the World" HEre are a few descritpitons:
                                >
                                > "The Wall Around the World" by Theodore R
                                > Cogswell, is an interesting offering, since in
                                > many respects it bears a startling resemblance
                                > to the Harry Potter books. But not too
                                > much of a resemblance. :-) I liked this one.
                                > The setting was intriguing, and the twist at the
                                > end particularly satisfying.
                                >
                                > I can't find a good synopsis but it won or was nominated for a
                                hugo
                                > and seems to have prefigured Harry Potter and has a protagonist
                                who
                                > is 14 when the story begins. any of that sound familiar?
                                >
                                >
                                > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <gauvaine@>
                                > wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Here's another one:
                                > >
                                > > Three men are in a cave after a nuclear war, and the one man
                                that
                                > > lives in the cave has copies of the Bible, Shakespeare, and
                                Dante,
                                > > in his cave, as well as phonograph with a few records. It's what
                                > is
                                > > left of civilization, pretty much. What of the other men tries
                                to
                                > > kill him at the end of the story, to take the phonograph.
                                > >
                                > > There's another story where there's a war in the far future
                                where
                                > > technology has made things so brutal and violent that a
                                soldier's
                                > > life expectancy is nil, practically. There are mines that pop up
                                > and
                                > > chase you until they wrap around you and blow your legs off.
                                There
                                > > are particle beams. Homing rockets. One particular soldier gets
                                > > caught in an explosion and sent to the past. He has video and
                                > audio
                                > > of his platoon trying to reach some objective. Scientists
                                dissect
                                > > the video and start broadcasting it the public, who demand peace
                                > in
                                > > order to change the future.
                                > >
                                > > Two people lie separated by an unending wall that goes forever
                                in
                                > > both directions. There's a crack in the wall so they can hear
                                and
                                > > talk to each other. They fall in love just from talking to each
                                > > other, day after day, week after week. They try to dig through
                                the
                                > > wall. After months and years, there's finally enough room to fit
                                > > through. They see each other and then go their separate ways,
                                the
                                > > reality not living up to the expectation and longing.
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > --- In fantasyfictiondungeon@yahoogroups.com, "Herod Antipas"
                                > > <antippas@> wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > > > That is the short story alright.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Matt <gauvaine@> wrote:
                                > > > > An Occurence at Owl Creek Bridge? Does that sound familiar?
                                > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > If I remember correctly, the protagonist's name in the story
                                was
                                > > > Payton Farquhar. I always liked that name. An Occurence at
                                Owl
                                > > > Creek Bridge is the classic story of it's type, used to such
                                > great
                                > > > effect in movies like Brazil, and Jacob's Ladder.
                                > > >
                                > > > The story by Bradbury is called "The Veldt"
                                > > >
                                > > > http://www.veddma.com/veddma/Veldt.htm
                                > > >
                                > > > it is quoted in its entirety on this website. I can;t help
                                it.
                                > I
                                > > > just have that kind of memory.
                                > > >
                                > >
                                >
                              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.