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Cell phones

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  • Deena Larsen
    Your dating and waiter stories just made me realize how I meet and recognize most people nowadays--cell phones. I get to the agreed on destination and
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 1, 2006
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      Your dating and waiter stories just made me realize how I meet and recognize most people nowadays--cell phones. I get to the agreed on destination and immediately call the person I am going to meet. If a cell phone rings within the restaurant, I hang up immediately and go slowly by that table. If the cell phone does not ring and there is a message, I leave a nice message: I am at the restaurant, looking forward to seeing you. If the cell phone rings and picks up, I ask something to find out if the person is in the restaurant--were you able to find parking? This has worked well except for one time, when I called and the person was immediately in front of me.

      I cannot imagine life now without a cell phone--and I only got one last year.

      As for recognizing waiters, I never even try. I always either signal anyone coming by--if that person is your waiter, he/she will ask what you need, and if not, that person will get your waiter.

      Deena


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    • C B Bonham
      Cornell University experimented with hamsters to find the hippocampus is implicated for recognition memory in humans. The research psychologists put a hamster
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 12, 2006
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        Cornell University experimented with hamsters to find
        the hippocampus is implicated for recognition memory
        in humans.

        The research psychologists put a hamster in a cage
        with a hamster which previously attacked him and
        another hamster it had never before encountered. The
        test hamster ran away from the attack hamster and made
        company with the other hamster indicating the test
        hamster recognized the attack hamster and remembered
        what happened to him.

        When the hamster's hippocampus was numbed with an
        anesthetisa rendering it nonfunctional, the test
        hamster did not avoid the attack hamster. The
        scientists determined the test hamster no longer
        recognized the attack hamster.

        Source:
        http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/March06/memory.recognition.to.html

        ~Bonnie

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      • D K
        As a dyslexic there are people who suggest we use a different part of the brain to process written words. Ron Davis wrote a book THE GIFT OF DYSLEXIA where he
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 12, 2006
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          As a dyslexic there are people who suggest we use a different part of
          the brain to process written words. Ron Davis wrote a book THE GIFT
          OF DYSLEXIA where he seemed to suggest how that may have come about.

          He sort of says as very small children we were smart enough and used
          deductive reasoning when we were processing data that was not coming
          thru our then underdeveloped eyes clearly. So then maybe that
          deductive resoning area took over instead of the natural area? I do
          seem to use deductive reasoning to figure out who people are also.

          Could it be that we used the strongest area instead of the area that
          worked best, you know because that area did not develope in the same
          effective time... maybe the advanced section took over and the later
          developing area was never used for that issue. Sort of a cognitive
          atrophy of facial recognition areas of the brain?

          Most of us (from my perspective) seem to have an abundance of
          intelectual intelligence (well maybe I should say I recognize it in
          you all but maybe not so much in me :) But in any event I would
          descibe my limited ability of recognition as one of deductive
          reasoning (of sorts).

          This theory would figure in with the visual questions posted about
          links between bad eyesight and faceblindness also. Seems it would
          work well with early or late developement issues too. Hmmm ? What
          do you all think?




          ---------------------------------------------------------------

          --- In faceblind@yahoogroups.com, C B Bonham <cb_bonham@...> wrote:
          >
          > Cornell University experimented with hamsters to find
          > the hippocampus is implicated for recognition memory
          > in humans.
          >
          > The research psychologists put a hamster in a cage
          > with a hamster which previously attacked him and
          > another hamster it had never before encountered. The
          > test hamster ran away from the attack hamster and made
          > company with the other hamster indicating the test
          > hamster recognized the attack hamster and remembered
          > what happened to him.
          >
          > When the hamster's hippocampus was numbed with an
          > anesthetisa rendering it nonfunctional, the test
          > hamster did not avoid the attack hamster. The
          > scientists determined the test hamster no longer
          > recognized the attack hamster.
          >
          > Source:
          >
          http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/March06/memory.recognition.to.html
          >
          > ~Bonnie
          >
          > __________________________________________________
          > Do You Yahoo!?
          > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          > http://mail.yahoo.com
          >
        • zusia@aol.com
          In a message dated 3/12/2006 12:40:49 AM Pacific Standard Time, cb_bonham@yahoo.com writes: When the hamster s hippocampus was numbed with an anesthetisa
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 12, 2006
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            In a message dated 3/12/2006 12:40:49 AM Pacific Standard Time,
            cb_bonham@... writes:

            When the hamster's hippocampus was numbed with an
            anesthetisa rendering it nonfunctional, the test
            hamster did not avoid the attack hamster. The
            scientists determined the test hamster no longer
            recognized the attack hamster.


            ********************************

            But doesn't isn't the hippocampus involved in recognition
            of smells? How do they know the hamster was using smell
            to recognize? Does it make a difference?

            Susan


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Mat
            ... Hamsters have HORRIBLE sight and mostly see and recognise via smell. I m currently trying to tame down a very bite-y and territorial Syrian hamster, and
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 12, 2006
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              > But doesn't isn't the hippocampus involved in recognition
              > of smells? How do they know the hamster was using smell
              > to recognize? Does it make a difference?
              >
              > Susan



              Hamsters have HORRIBLE sight and mostly 'see' and recognise via smell.

              I'm currently trying to tame down a very bite-y and territorial Syrian
              hamster, and I always need to remind myself to wash my hands first,
              especially if I've had them anywhere near the dwarf hamster, so he doesn't
              think that it's a New Creature entering his territory. (Meanwhile, the dwarf
              is incredibly chill unless I've just been eating, in which case he'll take
              an exploratory nibble or two.)

              You can actually watch this if you put a hamster (especially a dwarf) in a
              new setting...the first thing they'll do is make an action like they're
              washing their face. It's to stimulate their scent glands and get scent on
              their feet, so that if they get lost they can smell their way back to where
              they started.

              So, yes, the hamster was using smell to recognise. As to what that means as
              to this mapping onto us, I don't know at the moment and would probably have
              to read the entire write-up to even make a guess.

              -Mat


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • C B Bonham
              ... was using ... *** I found the article presented the experiment as if the scientists were narrow in their consideration of how the hamster recognized other
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 12, 2006
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                > But doesn't isn't the hippocampus involved in
                > recognition of smells? How do they know the hamster
                was using
                > smell to recognize? Does it make a difference?
                ***
                I found the article presented the experiment as if the
                scientists were narrow in their consideration of how
                the hamster recognized other hamsters.

                The article did mention hamsters use odor more than
                humans do as an identifier, however several people
                here use odor to identify people.

                I don't think it makes a difference in the context of
                this particular experiment. Whatever means the hamster
                used to identify, this experiment showed brain
                activity in the hippocampus.

                I have read other research that also concluded the
                hippocampus is involved in recognition.

                ~Bonnie

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              • ambeeba
                How do they know it has anything to do with recognition? Maybe the part of the brain they numbed is where common sense is located. Maybe he said, Hey look,
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 13, 2006
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                  How do they know it has anything to do with recognition? Maybe the
                  part of the brain they numbed is where "common sense" is located.
                  Maybe he said, "Hey look, there's that guy that beat me up! Cool!"
                  Or maybe he just felt so 'hazy' he just didn't care!
                  April Beeba
                  --- In faceblind@yahoogroups.com, C B Bonham <cb_bonham@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > But doesn't isn't the hippocampus involved in
                  > > recognition of smells? How do they know the hamster
                  > was using
                  > > smell to recognize? Does it make a difference?
                  > ***
                • zusia@aol.com
                  In a message dated 3/13/2006 10:18:23 AM Pacific Standard Time, april.beeba@valuecity.com writes: How do they know it has anything to do with recognition?
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 13, 2006
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                    In a message dated 3/13/2006 10:18:23 AM Pacific Standard Time,
                    april.beeba@... writes:

                    How do they know it has anything to do with recognition? Maybe the
                    part of the brain they numbed is where "common sense" is located.
                    Maybe he said, "Hey look, there's that guy that beat me up! Cool!"
                    Or maybe he just felt so 'hazy' he just didn't care!
                    April Beeba


                    ***************************************************************

                    Now that made me laugh out loud. So funny, April!!!

                    susan


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