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Re: Do you find this idea for a film offensive?

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  • bellkurve
    Nice of you to try to diagnose me from a few posts. FWIW, I m a highly educated trial attorney. If I had Aspergers, don t you think I d have problems picking
    Message 1 of 42 , Jul 19, 2012
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      Nice of you to try to diagnose me from a few posts. FWIW, I'm a highly educated trial attorney. If I had Aspergers, don't you think I'd have problems picking a jury?

      Now, if you really feel like beating me up, I can invite you to my dojo and we can go a few rounds. Don't care if you're male or female or if you have 100 lbs on me, I'll play anybody.

      But, if you'd rather make disparaging remarks about me, fine. Whatever floats your boat.

      --- In faceblind@yahoogroups.com, "davestumpffb" <nicesmokes@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > LOL - Are you sure you're on the right site? Judging from your hostile and defiant response you might want to join an Aspergers site. I am sure a couple of our members could suggest a site. They also wouldn't expect you to worry about their feelings when you expressed your opinions ;)
      >
      >
      > Dave
      >
      > --- In faceblind@yahoogroups.com, "bellkurve" <bellkurve@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Nope, I called the film idea stupid - people who have differences learn to adapt. Assuming, based on the plot of the proposed film, that the people were only faceblind, then those people would have adaptations.
      > >
      > > Most people who have memory problems have adaptations. Many people, especially when going someplace confusing like a large hospital complex, take along a friend or relative who does not have a memory problem that makes confusing places impossible.
      > >
      > > Remember, the premise of the movie is 4 faceblind people - not 4 faceblind people who are also limited by other physical and neurological conditions such that we need a spreadsheet of diagnoses to understand why a particular event would be "funny".
      > >
      > > But, if you want to assume I'm calling you stupid because you have other neurological conditions on top of prosopagnosia that make your situation even more difficult, I'm not going to stand in your way.
      > >
      > > You want to say I'm cold and crass or whatever because I voice my actual opinion without sugarcoating it - fine. I'm not afraid of offending people because I have an opinion.
      > >
      > > Therapy for FB may be around the corner - I don't know. So, am I supposed to assume that this film is science fiction because the person with the idea doesn't know there's no such therapy in existence now? Or, should I just assume that his/her knowledge of FB is so shallow that s/he doesn't know?
      > >
      > > I'll stick with voicing my opinion. Then, I don't have to remember how to sugar coat stuff for people so that they can make a buck (and a laugh) off of a condition they obviously don't understand.
      > >
      > > --- In faceblind@yahoogroups.com, BLYTHEPLUNKETT@ wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > This has nothing to do with "being stupid" and you've (Bellkurve) pretty much just told me I'm stupid. Aside from being faceblind, my visual memory was also greatly effected and I might not remember what someone was wearing and also have topographagnosia so I might not remember what table I was at or the position. This problem happens to me every time I have to get up in a restaurant to use the bathroom with friends or family. I can never remember how to get back to my table and have to try very hard to scan the room to find anything halfway familiar. I've run into an exboyfriend and didn't know who he was, so I wouldn't remember someone I just met. Judging from the storyline, the couples may not be able to "sense" who their partner is because they won't know eachother that well yet. I too sense who people are, but not until I know them well enough. I take no offense to the script, I take offense to being called "insensitive" and "stupid" by you since these are very real situations to me. My most horrifying moment was going to sleep in a neighbor's home one night and not knowing I wasn't at home. I also didn't know when the man that lived there woke me up that he wasn't someone I knew. Doctor's are currently working on therapy for faceblindness so it's not too far out. You may also be going to therapy in dealing with it. Our group can be so cold towards outsiders who are wanting to help us. This is such a newly looked at problem that we can't expect those that are face-sighted to understand exactly what we go through. We need to embrace their want to help because we need all we can get. They are asking for our help, we can give constructive criticism without being mean. We'll turn away everyone soon enough acting like elitists that no one will want to help.
      > > >
      > > > I agree with Daniel's statement here:
      > > > "A more realistic comedy bent would be the aspect of not recognizing them when they are not expected to run into....,..say man is proso, woman not...they happened to both be at the sstore...down the same aisle...he walks right past her cluelsss she was there because he didnt hear her say "Hey XXX"
      > > >
      > > > Another aspect would be if she suddenly decides to change her hair stule dramatically like going blond, cutting it really short, curling it, putting it in a bun....thus he doesnt recognize her. Another aspect would be say they happened to be at the same place at the same time but she has a different hair srtle...he appoaches her and tries to pick her up without realizing its her."
      > > >
      > > > And Marcy's ideas:
      > > > How about a faceblind detective, who because he can't
      > > > identify faces, has to rely on his superior developed other senses. It
      > > > could be played many ways too for comedy or drama or a combination of
      > > > both at the same time.
      > > >
      > > > Steena:
      > > > Hallelujah! We undestand eachother.
      > > >
      > > > Stephanie:
      > > > AGREED!: "When I first meet people, I often get confused between the different people, especially if they have the same general build and similar accents. I also have a tendency to confuse two people that I met at the same time."
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > -----Original Message-----
      > > > From: bellkurve <bellkurve@>
      > > > To: faceblind <faceblind@yahoogroups.com>
      > > > Sent: Tue, Jul 17, 2012 11:51 am
      > > > Subject: [faceblind] Re: Do you find this idea for a film offensive?
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > I'm not so much offended as I think it's a stupid idea. I wouldn't "switch partners" halfway through a date because there's usually something distinctive about the people I'm with that tells me who they are. You think I'm wrong, but, let's look at it: you're not suggesting your characters are so blind that they start thinking the person of the same sex is actually the person they're dating. You're not suggesting that they forget that they're at the neurologists office for "therapy" ("therapy"? really? for prosopagnosia? really?) and forget that they're there with a same sex friend who also has prosopagnosia.
      > > >
      > > > If one guy's wearing a blue tie during a date, chances are he's not switching ties. If one woman's wearing a gold necklace during a date, chances are it stays the same throughout. People who have prosopagnosia are going to be even more sensitive to similarities and distinctions. Some of us actually wear a constant piece of jewelry in EVERY situation just incase we run into people who are a lot like us (or hate to identify ourselves in a photograph).
      > > >
      > > > You would have to have some really dumb, insensitive faceblind people who are so crass that they wear pretty closely the exact same thing as the other faceblind person, have the same hair, and pretty much the same voice. For those of us who get a "sense" of the person - they'd also have to move pretty much exactly the same, have the same gestures, the same opinions, and be, well, identical twins in all ways.
      > > >
      > > > And then you'd have the problem of even if I was out with twins, and only seeing one of them, I'd still know where I sit at the table as it relates to where my date is sitting. Plus, since everybody's faceblind, there wouldn't be quite the embarrassment of not being exactly sure who a person is.
      > > >
      > > > I'd rethink it a bit. You're essentailly making a Mr. Magoo comedy about prosopagnosia without really understanding that we're not stupid.
      > > >
      > > > --- In faceblind@yahoogroups.com, "super_furry_dan" <no_way_jose@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > I have had an idea for a film involving characters who are suffering from Prosopagnosia. I would like to explain it here, to see whether members of the group find the idea offensive, because of course I am aware that making a comedy movie featuring characters with a disability is a sensitive subject. I should state outright that I have no personal experience of this condition.
      > > > >
      > > > > The film would be a romantic comedy featuring four face-blind characters who meet outside the office of a neurologist who specialises in the treatment of Face Blindness. Two males, who know each other through their therapy, and two females, who also know each other through their therapy. Without knowing that the other pair is face blind, they arrange a double date, and unknowingly switch partners halfway through.
      > > > >
      > > > > This plot device interests me as a writer because of what it says about love. To have characters think that they're falling in love with one person, while its actually someone else, is a fascinating idea to me, and I don't think it can be portrayed any other way, other than using characters who have this affliction. At least not in a face to face setting.
      > > > >
      > > > > To be clear, there would also be humour deriving from the fact that the characters are not talking to the people they think they are. So, simple question; is a romantic comedy which use these mis-understandings as a key plot device offensive to you?
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • TEJAS
      Was going through old messages here, and saw this. I have to mention how glad I am to find another prosapagnosiac who is detail-deficient , as i like to call
      Message 42 of 42 , Aug 5, 2012
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        Was going through old messages here, and saw this. I have to mention how glad I am to find another prosapagnosiac who is "detail-deficient", as i like to call it. I'm not sure if it makes it worse, or wether it's a coping strategy. It may be the latter because the times when i do try hard to notice minute details (say when im looking at that girl i like, i wanna retain every detail) it gets messed up, the more i look the less i recognize them.
        Still, glad to know im not the only one.

        --- In faceblind@yahoogroups.com, "Steena Chamberlain" <tobuika@...> wrote:
        >
        > Another thing to perhaps consider is that face blind people are not equally
        > adept at picking up on clues to distinguish people. Of course, many face
        > blind people become stunning experts at noticing subtleties in clothing,
        > mannerisms, expressions, voice, etc. However, others like me fail to notice
        > even obvious differences in hair, jewelry, and clothing, despite being fully
        > aware of how crucial it is to observe everything. For some reason, even
        > when I try to pour my whole concentration into noticing details, my brain
        > becomes overloaded with the information, and I end up retaining very little.
        > Most of the time, though, it doesn't occur to me to notice details in the
        > first place. The result: I frequently stumble through life in a fog. Not
        > only will I fail to notice a woman's blue scarf, but I can talk to her all
        > day and still not be able to say afterwards what color shirt (or was it a
        > dress?) she had been wearing. I'm generally not a stupid person, but in
        > this area, I am woefully inept - just like the proposed characters.
        >
        >
        >
        > Worse still, since I'm used to being in a puzzled fog all the time, I find
        > myself less likely to pick up on glaring discrepancies. For example, let's
        > say I'm wrongly assuming that a person is "Lee," but I notice he has the
        > wrong hairstyle, walks with an unfamiliar gait, or offers an opinion
        > different from Lee's. Instead of picking up on the incongruity and making
        > the logical connection "Oh, that must not be Lee," I feel a general sense of
        > confusion that blurs so seamlessly into the confusion I'm already constantly
        > feeling that I usually don't even notice it. I just think vaguely, "Oh, I
        > got something wrong again," and I move on, trying to assimilate the new
        > information about Lee without questioning my initial assumption. If someone
        > were to call my attention to my faulty logic, I could analyze it and figure
        > out my mistake it, but without someone specifically pointing it out, I'm
        > more likely to just give a confused shrug and go with the flow without
        > giving it a second thought.
        >
        >
        >
        > Unfortunately, I can conceivably see myself as one of those characters
        > described in the film idea - a person who fails to recognize a switcheroo
        > mid-date. It's just how I function. However, if I knew ahead of time that
        > more than one of us had face blindness (or were in a sort of face blindness
        > group together), then I would have my radar tuned for identity mix-ups and
        > probably wouldn't be fooled for long.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > From: faceblind@yahoogroups.com [mailto:faceblind@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        > Of bellkurve
        > Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2012 11:52 AM
        > To: faceblind@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [faceblind] Re: Do you find this idea for a film offensive?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > I'm not so much offended as I think it's a stupid idea. I wouldn't "switch
        > partners" halfway through a date because there's usually something
        > distinctive about the people I'm with that tells me who they are. You think
        > I'm wrong, but, let's look at it: you're not suggesting your characters are
        > so blind that they start thinking the person of the same sex is actually the
        > person they're dating. You're not suggesting that they forget that they're
        > at the neurologists office for "therapy" ("therapy"? really? for
        > prosopagnosia? really?) and forget that they're there with a same sex friend
        > who also has prosopagnosia.
        >
        > If one guy's wearing a blue tie during a date, chances are he's not
        > switching ties. If one woman's wearing a gold necklace during a date,
        > chances are it stays the same throughout. People who have prosopagnosia are
        > going to be even more sensitive to similarities and distinctions. Some of us
        > actually wear a constant piece of jewelry in EVERY situation just incase we
        > run into people who are a lot like us (or hate to identify ourselves in a
        > photograph).
        >
        > You would have to have some really dumb, insensitive faceblind people who
        > are so crass that they wear pretty closely the exact same thing as the other
        > faceblind person, have the same hair, and pretty much the same voice. For
        > those of us who get a "sense" of the person - they'd also have to move
        > pretty much exactly the same, have the same gestures, the same opinions, and
        > be, well, identical twins in all ways.
        >
        > And then you'd have the problem of even if I was out with twins, and only
        > seeing one of them, I'd still know where I sit at the table as it relates to
        > where my date is sitting. Plus, since everybody's faceblind, there wouldn't
        > be quite the embarrassment of not being exactly sure who a person is.
        >
        > I'd rethink it a bit. You're essentailly making a Mr. Magoo comedy about
        > prosopagnosia without really understanding that we're not stupid.
        >
        > --- In faceblind@yahoogroups.com <mailto:faceblind%40yahoogroups.com> ,
        > "super_furry_dan" <no_way_jose@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I have had an idea for a film involving characters who are suffering from
        > Prosopagnosia. I would like to explain it here, to see whether members of
        > the group find the idea offensive, because of course I am aware that making
        > a comedy movie featuring characters with a disability is a sensitive
        > subject. I should state outright that I have no personal experience of this
        > condition.
        > >
        > > The film would be a romantic comedy featuring four face-blind characters
        > who meet outside the office of a neurologist who specialises in the
        > treatment of Face Blindness. Two males, who know each other through their
        > therapy, and two females, who also know each other through their therapy.
        > Without knowing that the other pair is face blind, they arrange a double
        > date, and unknowingly switch partners halfway through.
        > >
        > > This plot device interests me as a writer because of what it says about
        > love. To have characters think that they're falling in love with one person,
        > while its actually someone else, is a fascinating idea to me, and I don't
        > think it can be portrayed any other way, other than using characters who
        > have this affliction. At least not in a face to face setting.
        > >
        > > To be clear, there would also be humour deriving from the fact that the
        > characters are not talking to the people they think they are. So, simple
        > question; is a romantic comedy which use these mis-understandings as a key
        > plot device offensive to you?
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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