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RE: [XP] overtime thread -- and the "Set-Up-To-Fail" Syndrome

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  • Kay Pentecost
    Hi, Jeff, ... I m concerned with that, too. And I think, that perhaps the title conveys some interesting psychology. No one wants to admit that they are a
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 26, 2004
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      Hi, Jeff,

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Jeff Grigg [mailto:jeffgrigg@...]
      > Sent: Friday, November 26, 2004 11:18 AM
      > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [XP] overtime thread -- and the "Set-Up-To-Fail" Syndrome
      >
      >
      >
      > >> From: Jeff Grigg [mailto:jeffgrigg@c...]
      > >> [...] I've observed some managers who seem to think
      > >> that the only way to improve productivity is to whip
      > >> the coders into working harder, churning out code,
      > >> and working overtime to "get it done on time." [...]
      >
      > --- "Kay Pentecost" <tranzpupy@i...> wrote:
      > > Check out the set-up-to-Fail syndrome.
      > > http://www.set-up-to-fail.net/
      > > "How Good Managers Cause Great People to Fail."
      >
      > Most interesting and relevant.
      >
      > Personally, however, I'm more concerned with how bad managers cause
      > their entire team to fail, rather than how bad first impressions, or
      > a difference in communication styles, spoils a relationship, leading
      > essentially to discrimination against some individual employees.

      I'm concerned with that, too. And I think, that perhaps the title conveys
      some interesting psychology. No one wants to admit that they are a *bad*
      manager. And the manager who hired the manager doesn't want to admit that
      he made a mistake, either... So, some "bad" managers, deluding themselves
      that they are "good" managers, read the book and learn a *little* about how
      to be better managers....

      Kay
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