Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: (OT) Re: [XP] SmallTalk

Expand Messages
  • Ron Jeffries
    ... That s the point of the articles, actually. To push the code in different directions, so that people can begin to feel the forces that act, and anticipate
    Message 1 of 47 , Oct 3, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      On Sunday, October 3, 2004, at 10:04:03 AM, Ken Boucher wrote:

      > I'm not sure the books on coding are all that much of a help anyway.
      > I've seen what Merciless Refactoring did to your simple and easy to
      > read bowling program and I wasn't impressed. It didn't make it
      > simpler, it didn't make it easier to read, and I didn't see how it
      > could have possibly made it faster. In fact, given enough time the
      > code bloat could have killed the time it would have taken to load the
      > program into memory.

      That's the point of the articles, actually. To push the code in different
      directions, so that people can begin to feel the forces that act, and
      anticipate better what will happen when they respond.

      It doesn't make sense to push every pattern we know into every line of
      code. Nor does it make sense to write every line of code directly after the
      previous one in a big giant procedure.

      We write code, ultimately, in order to delight those customers you talk
      about. We can delight them with bullsh1t for a while, but they won't stay
      satisfied for long if we don't ship them running software, on time, on
      budget, and fit for purpose. And we can't do that just by sitting down for
      a friendly chat. The better we code, the faster we code, the better we can
      delight the customer with what really matters: a program that they like.

      I am one of the most rabid people here on the outer circle of XP, the
      Customer/Programmer interface. I bow to no one in my passion for the
      conversation: it helps the customer tell us what she wants; it helps us
      understand; it helps the customer recognize what she asked for in what we
      do.

      And yet we have to ship software that works to truly delight the customer.
      And the better we know how to do those inner circle items, the better we
      can do that.

      There is no exclusive or in software development. We have to be good at it
      all. It would be fatuous to dismiss our passion for the development craft
      just because we have discovered the great joy of being together with our
      customer and our team.

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      Testing should be done...
      (a) ...from the beginning of a project.
      (b) ...starting at some point in the middle of a project.
      (c) ...on those who think it should only be done at the end of a project.
      -- A poster at Rational spotted by J. B. Rainsberger
    • Steven Gordon
      ... From: greeni_63 [mailto:greeni_63@yahoo.com] Sent: Mon 10/4/2004 10:48 AM To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com Cc: Subject: [XP] Re: What is our craft?
      Message 47 of 47 , Oct 4, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        -----Original Message-----
        From: greeni_63 [mailto:greeni_63@...]
        Sent: Mon 10/4/2004 10:48 AM
        To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
        Cc:
        Subject: [XP] Re: What is our craft? Quality and Metrics

        <snip>

        I also recall that Gerry Weinberg said that the customer will rarely
        know what they want until after we give them what they asked for.

        <snip>

        David Greenfield




        To make matters even more unstable, most of our customers are trying to use what we provide them to satisfy their customers, who also will not know what they want until after our customer gives them what they asked for. And many of those customers are trying to use what our customer gives them to satisfy their customers, who also do not yet know what they want. And so on.


        Then add on the perturbations caused by competitors who try to convince any of the customers in this chain that what they offer is what they really want.



        No matter what we produce, we will have to be able to adapt it to these layers of market forces to be long term successes.



        Steven Gordon

        http://sf.asu.edu/





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.