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Re: [XP] Is XP appropriate for my project

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  • Ron Jeffries
    ... I d be looking at just a few things from the pantheon. IMO Scrum and CC are subsets of XP, at least to a first approximation. Anyway ... Some simple
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 9, 2004
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      On Monday, August 9, 2004, at 10:47:55 AM, wes_graves wrote:

      > I am working on a fairly small, but complicated project. I will be
      > the only full-time resource with two other part-time expert users.
      > They will be the people I go to for strategic direction, but the day
      > to day stuff will be in my full control.

      > I want to have a methodology in place because eventually this project
      > will expand and more people will come on board. Also, I want to
      > ensure that I am keeping on schedule and maintaining my focus and
      > scope. Basically I need something to help keep me on track.

      > The two part-time resources are not onsite and I work from home. The
      > project is a web based HR type solution that will be implemented in
      > phases that will gradually build up the functionality of the product.

      > I have looked at XP, SCRUM and Crystal Clear and have not really
      > seen anything that made one standout from the other for my particular
      > purposes. Does anyone have any suggestions?

      I'd be looking at just a few things from the pantheon. IMO Scrum and CC are
      subsets of XP, at least to a first approximation. Anyway ...

      Some simple iteration planning:
      In the next two weeks, we will implement A, B, and C, which we estimate
      as difficulty 1, 3, and 2 respectively. Then track and report the extent
      to which you did it, and improve your ability to call the shots.

      Some acceptance testing, perhaps with FIT.
      This allows you to publish proof that what you're doing does what it's
      supposed to do, and serves to build up a set of human-understandable
      tests that support changes later. If each requirement A, B, C is
      represented by concrete acceptance tests in FIT, little more has to be
      written.

      Lots of unit testing using whatever xUnit is available or a tune of your
      own invention.
      This will serve to support growing the group, since the new programmers
      will have tests to look to, and there will be two tiers of tests, unit
      and acceptance, to protect you against the inevitable injection of
      defects that will result.

      And of course, code management and an automated build, keeping the system
      ready to ship every day, day in and day out.

      Do that much and life will be easier, and you'll be ahead of most of the
      projects in the universe.

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      Ron gave me a good suggestion once. -- Carlton (banshee858)
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