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CFP: "Killer Examples" workshop

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  • Carl G. Alphonce
    Dear colleagues, Do you use OO design patterns? Do you teach an objects-first CS1? Do you have some nifty examples you d like to share? If so, read on!
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 13, 2004
      Dear colleagues,

      Do you use OO design patterns? Do you teach an objects-first CS1? Do
      you have some nifty examples you'd like to share? If so, read on!

      Below is the first CFP for the third "Killer Examples for Design Patterns
      and Objects First" workshop, to be held at OOPSLA 2004 in beautiful
      Vancouver, Canada. Previous workshops were held at OOPSLA 2002 and OOPSLA
      2003. New this year, there are two ways to participate: you can either
      submit a killer example to present, or you may apply to attend as a
      discussant.

      The deadline for submissions/applications is September 3, 2004, but
      earlier submissions are encouraged.

      If you have questions about the workshop, do not hesitate to contact me at
      <alphonce@...>, with subject line "OOPSLA-2004 Workshop Query".

      Carl Alphonce
      Department of Computer Science and Engineering
      University at Buffalo


      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
      First
      Call for Submissions
      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

      3rd "Killer Examples" for Design Patterns and Objects First workshop
      http://www.cse.Buffalo.EDU/faculty/alphonce/KillerExamples/OOPSLA2004/
      A workshop at OOPSLA 2004, Vancouver, BC, CANADA


      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
      Important dates
      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

      September 3, 2004 - Deadline for submissions
      September 13, 2004 - Notification of acceptance
      September 16, 2004 - OOPSLA2004 early registration deadline
      Sunday October 24, 2004 - Workshop @ OOPSLA2004!


      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
      General information
      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

      The Jargon File defines a killer app as an "application that actually makes a
      sustaining market for a promising but under-utilized technology." A killer
      example provides clear and compelling motivation for some concept. The theme
      of this workshop is killer examples for design patterns and object-oriented
      concepts.

      Today's computer science students are tomorrow's software developers. They
      will be expected to design and implement solutions to complex problems.
      Object orientation is an excellent approach to managing the complexity of
      large, real-world software systems. Design patterns are an essential part of
      an object oriented approach to managing complexity. We believe killer
      examples can motivate students and pique their curiosity about both.

      The goal of this workshop is to elicit, share, analyze and critique killer
      examples from educators and developers. Pre-workshop activities encourage
      interaction and refinement of examples prior to the workshop. For information
      on previous years' workshops, see
      http://www.cse.Buffalo.EDU/faculty/alphonce/KillerExamples/OOPSLA2002/
      http://www.cse.Buffalo.EDU/faculty/alphonce/KillerExamples/OOPSLA2003/


      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
      How can I participate?
      - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

      If you are interested in participating, there are two ways to do it!
      You can either contribute a killer example, or you may apply to attend
      as a discussant.

      If you wish to contribute a killer example you must submit a short
      proposal (4 to 6 pages) as an e-mail attachment to
      alphonce@... with subject line "OOPSLA-2004 Workshop
      Killer Example Submission". Your submission must clearly identify an
      example and why you believe it is a "killer example", as described in
      the "Themes and Goals" section of the web site

      http://www.cse.Buffalo.EDU/faculty/alphonce/KillerExamples/OOPSLA2004/#Themes

      If you wish to attend the workshop as a discussant you must submit a
      short statement of interest (a manifesto, if you will) (1 to 2 pages)
      as an e-mail attachment to alphonce@... with subject line
      "OOPSLA-2004 Workshop Discussant Submission". Your submission must
      clearly state why you are interested in attending the workshop, what
      background you have (e.g. are you a developer or an educator), your
      design pattern experience. We seek the participation of people with a
      broad spectrum of backgrounds, so don't hesitate to submit an
      application because you think you have too little/too much experience
      to contribute.

      Submissions must be made on or before the submission deadline.
      Submissions may be in plain text, in Microsoft Word .doc format or in
      PDF. You must submit two versions - one anonymous and one with author
      names and affiliations. Avoid self-references, if any, in the text of
      the submission.

      Each submission will be anonymously reviewed by at least three members
      of the organizing committee. The decision of the organizing committee
      is final.

      If your submission is accepted, you (or one of your co-authors) is
      expected to register for the workshop and attend.

      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      () ascii ribbon campaign - against html e-mail
      /\
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Carl Alphonce alphonce@...
      Dept of Computer Science and Engineering (716) 645-3180 x115 (tel)
      University at Buffalo (716) 645-3464 (fax)
      Buffalo, NY 14260-2000 www.cse.buffalo.edu/~alphonce
    • Carl G. Alphonce
      Dear colleagues, Do you use OO design patterns? Do you teach an objects-first CS1? Do you have some nifty examples you d like to share? If so, read on!
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 1, 2004
        Dear colleagues,

        Do you use OO design patterns? Do you teach an objects-first CS1? Do
        you have some nifty examples you'd like to share? If so, read on!

        Below is the second CFP for the third "Killer Examples for Design Patterns
        and Objects First" workshop, to be held at OOPSLA 2004 in beautiful
        Vancouver, Canada. Previous workshops were held at OOPSLA 2002 and OOPSLA
        2003. New this year, there are two ways to participate: you can either
        submit a killer example to present, or you may apply to attend as a
        discussant.

        The deadline for submissions/applications is September 3, 2004, but
        earlier submissions are encouraged.

        If you have questions about the workshop, do not hesitate to contact me at
        <alphonce@...>, with subject line "OOPSLA-2004 Workshop Query".

        Carl Alphonce
        Department of Computer Science and Engineering
        University at Buffalo


        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Second
        Call for Submissions
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

        3rd "Killer Examples" for Design Patterns and Objects First workshop
        http://www.cse.Buffalo.EDU/faculty/alphonce/KillerExamples/OOPSLA2004/
        A workshop at OOPSLA 2004, Vancouver, BC, CANADA


        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        Important dates
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

        September 3, 2004 - Deadline for submissions
        September 13, 2004 - Notification of acceptance
        September 16, 2004 - OOPSLA2004 early registration deadline
        Sunday October 24, 2004 - Workshop @ OOPSLA2004!


        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        General information
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

        The Jargon File defines a killer app as an "application that actually makes a
        sustaining market for a promising but under-utilized technology." A killer
        example provides clear and compelling motivation for some concept. The theme
        of this workshop is killer examples for design patterns and object-oriented
        concepts.

        Today's computer science students are tomorrow's software developers. They
        will be expected to design and implement solutions to complex problems.
        Object orientation is an excellent approach to managing the complexity of
        large, real-world software systems. Design patterns are an essential part of
        an object oriented approach to managing complexity. We believe killer
        examples can motivate students and pique their curiosity about both.

        The goal of this workshop is to elicit, share, analyze and critique killer
        examples from educators and developers. Pre-workshop activities encourage
        interaction and refinement of examples prior to the workshop. For information
        on previous years' workshops, see
        http://www.cse.Buffalo.EDU/faculty/alphonce/KillerExamples/OOPSLA2002/
        http://www.cse.Buffalo.EDU/faculty/alphonce/KillerExamples/OOPSLA2003/


        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        How can I participate?
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

        If you are interested in participating, there are two ways to do it!
        You can either contribute a killer example, or you may apply to attend
        as a discussant.

        If you wish to contribute a killer example you must submit a short
        proposal (4 to 6 pages) as an e-mail attachment to
        alphonce@... with subject line "OOPSLA-2004 Workshop
        Killer Example Submission". Your submission must clearly identify an
        example and why you believe it is a "killer example", as described in
        the "Themes and Goals" section of the web site

        http://www.cse.Buffalo.EDU/faculty/alphonce/KillerExamples/OOPSLA2004/#Themes

        If you wish to attend the workshop as a discussant you must submit a
        short statement of interest (a manifesto, if you will) (1 to 2 pages)
        as an e-mail attachment to alphonce@... with subject line
        "OOPSLA-2004 Workshop Discussant Submission". Your submission must
        clearly state why you are interested in attending the workshop, what
        background you have (e.g. are you a developer or an educator), your
        design pattern experience. We seek the participation of people with a
        broad spectrum of backgrounds, so don't hesitate to submit an
        application because you think you have too little/too much experience
        to contribute.

        Submissions must be made on or before the submission deadline.
        Submissions may be in plain text, in Microsoft Word .doc format or in
        PDF. You must submit two versions - one anonymous and one with author
        names and affiliations. Avoid self-references, if any, in the text of
        the submission.

        Each submission will be anonymously reviewed by at least three members
        of the organizing committee. The decision of the organizing committee
        is final.

        If your submission is accepted, you (or one of your co-authors) is
        expected to register for the workshop and attend.

        ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        () ascii ribbon campaign - against html e-mail
        /\
        ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Carl Alphonce alphonce@...
        Dept of Computer Science and Engineering (716) 645-3180 x115 (tel)
        University at Buffalo (716) 645-3464 (fax)
        Buffalo, NY 14260-2000 www.cse.buffalo.edu/~alphonce
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