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RE: [XP] iterative airplane design was - divide an elephant into pieces?

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  • Steven Gordon
    This approach seems more analogous to code-and-fix than XP. ... From: Keith Ray [mailto:keithray@mac.com] Sent: Mon 5/3/2004 6:23 AM To:
    Message 1 of 1 , May 3, 2004
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      This approach seems more analogous to code-and-fix than XP.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Keith Ray [mailto:keithray@...]
      Sent: Mon 5/3/2004 6:23 AM
      To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      Cc:
      Subject: [XP] iterative airplane design was - divide an elephant into pieces?



      > On Monday, May 3, 2004, at 4:08:43 AM, Orhan Kalayci wrote:
      >
      >> If you would construct a plane in an XP manner, how would you do it?
      >

      see <http://www.findarticles.com/m3125/16_71/55727448/p1/article.jhtml>

      Quick-and-dirty structural design puts the Gossamer Condor in the air.
      Machine Design, August 19, 1999, by Ronald Khol


      One of the most unusual aircraft ever built evolved from an
      engineering process that was anachronistic even when the craft was
      designed in the 1970s. Though sophisticated computer-based engineering
      had already become a mainstay of the aircraft industry when the
      Gossamer Condor was designed, the craft turned out to be perhaps the
      epitome of structural optimization done by "old-fashioned" processes.
      The initial design evolved from only the most fundamental of standard
      engineering equations, and then virtually all refinement was done by
      make-and-break testing guided by a healthy dose of educated intuition.
      ...
      A quick-and-dirty approach," says Dr. MacCready, "is sometimes the most
      appropriate and elegant method in the early stages of a pioneering
      design. If a part broke, we replaced it with a member that was heavier
      and sturdier. If a part never broke, we made it lighter and,
      consequently, flimsier." He points out that this is what intense
      structural optimization requires when calculations do not play a major
      role in the process. The fact that the craft was always flown low and
      slow made destructive flight tests safe and feasible.
      ...

      --
      C. Keith Ray
      <http://homepage.mac.com/keithray/blog/index.html>
      <http://homepage.mac.com/keithray/xpminifaq.html>
      <http://homepage.mac.com/keithray/resume2.html>



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