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Re: [XP] Frameworks for acceptance testing web apps.

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  • Chris Hanson
    ... This is the recommendation I ve heard from several people, and it s what I d try. The QA people who used to be at the end of the process move some of
    Message 1 of 4 , May 1, 2004
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      On Apr 27, 2004, at 2:10 PM, Joseph Graves wrote:
      > If you were starting from scratch I would recommend training your
      > testers in language and concepts one of the open source test tools so
      > that they could get involved at story-definition time and help review
      > requirements with the customers. Then they could become the people
      > capable of designing the tests.

      This is the recommendation I've heard from several people, and it's
      what I'd try. The QA people who used to be at the end of the process
      move some of their work to the start of the process, helping the
      customers to specify -- in the form of tests -- the acceptance criteria
      for individual user stories.

      As Robert C. Martin says, "Testing is a form of specification, not
      verification."

      -- Chris

      --
      Chris Hanson <cmh@...>
      http://www.livejournal.com/users/chanson/
    • Steven J. Owens
      ... A good way to pitch this might be: Q: What s the purpose of testing? A: To make sure the software does what it s supposed to do. Q: How do you know what
      Message 2 of 4 , May 2, 2004
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        On Sat, May 01, 2004 at 11:51:14PM -0700, Chris Hanson wrote:
        > This is the recommendation I've heard from several people, and it's
        > what I'd try. The QA people who used to be at the end of the process
        > move some of their work to the start of the process, helping the
        > customers to specify -- in the form of tests -- the acceptance criteria
        > for individual user stories.
        >
        > As Robert C. Martin says, "Testing is a form of specification, not
        > verification."

        A good way to pitch this might be:

        Q: What's the purpose of testing?
        A: To make sure the software does what it's supposed to do.

        Q: How do you know what it's supposed to do?
        A: Get involved with the customer early to help them specify it.

        ...leading ultimately to the "specification, not verification"
        point of view.


        --
        Steven J. Owens
        puff@...

        "I'm going to make broad, sweeping generalizations and strong,
        declarative statements, because otherwise I'll be here all night and
        this document will be four times longer and much less fun to read.
        Take it all with a grain of salt." - Me at http://darksleep.com
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