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Re: [XP] Appraisals in a company adopting XP

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  • J. B. Rainsberger
    ... So part of your contribution to the organization is process improvement. In that case, it s reasonable that part of your evaluation depend on how well you
    Message 1 of 10 , May 1, 2004
      Tony Byrne wrote:

      > Hello J.B.,
      >
      > Thursday, April 29, 2004, 7:01:37 PM, you wrote:
      >
      > JBR> I have one question: you say you've had only partial success in
      > JBR> implementing XP. Is implementing XP your primary responsibility?
      >
      > To be honest, probably not. I'm first and foremost a developer. However,
      > when I was hired, the company recognized that my previous experience of working
      > with a software development process would fill a gap in the team and could
      > be valuable as the team grew. So, responsibility for process improvement
      > and the introduction of development best practice was built into my
      > role. I came across XP and I 'got it'. After presenting it to the team, we
      > agreed that we should adopt it as our our development methodology.

      So part of your contribution to the organization is process improvement.
      In that case, it's reasonable that part of your evaluation depend on how
      well you improve the company's processes. How much emphasis, in
      percentage, do you think is reasonable to put on your process
      improvement work, compared to your development work? (You don't have to
      tell me, but you should think about it.)

      > JBR> How have you fared in helping to deliver the results your boss expects? The
      > JBR> reason I ask goes back to the old standby: we're not in it to do XP;
      > JBR> we're in it to write great software -- it just so happens that we think
      > JBR> XP is the best way to make that happen.
      >
      > I work for a company that develops its own systems to support its
      > business. This company has never experienced a software project go
      > sour and so the value of "great software" is not well understood.
      >
      > Our team is small and with or without XP it manages
      > to deliver functionality to the business at a rate that the business seems
      > happy with. So why do I continue to push XP? Well, because I don't
      > believe that the ad hoc approach is sustainable long term and I see XP
      > as a means of heading off trouble.

      What opportunities are there to do XP in your organization. Typically
      one only uses a new approach to solve problems or to experiment on
      medium-sized projects. If you have neither opportunity, then how exactly
      are you moving forward?

      Take care.
      --
      J. B. Rainsberger,
      Diaspar Software Services
      http://www.diasparsoftware.com :: +1 416 791-8603
      Let's write software that people understand
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