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Anouncing JeffriesXP, WakeXP, YourNameHereXP

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  • Ron Jeffries
    When I m working with people trying to do XP, there are many practices that I ll recommend from time to time, as the occasion seems to call for. Some of the
    Message 1 of 4 , May 1, 2004
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      When I'm working with people trying to do XP, there are many practices that
      I'll recommend from time to time, as the occasion seems to call for. Some
      of the practices have names, like Readiness Assessment, or Big Visible
      Chart, and some do not. I feel sure that all of us pull out some
      recommended practice from time to time, that fits the immediate need of the
      team we're working with.

      These are good practices, and they are nicely applicable to teams doing XP,
      compared, say, to extensive up front design, which really isn't very often
      applicable. :)

      So we have ten thousand things that among us we all know. Some of them are
      explicitly named in XP. Some of them go well with XP in this or that
      situation; some do not. We pull these tricks from the bag in accord with
      our experience, our reading, our conversations with each other. Sometimes
      we even make up a new one.

      There's an art to picking one of these practices in the right place and
      time. In general, I think, we'd rather need to recommend nothing: the team
      would just be doing the right things, using their own intuition, not ours.

      When people are given a list of practices, a common mistake is that they
      decide they are supposed to do them all. Thus RUP people often do a million
      things, even though RUP clearly states that you have to create a specific
      case for your project. Same for CMM: it clearly states that it should be
      customized, yet a common response is to pile on the practices. Beck
      cleverly took advantage of this tendency people have by making all the XP
      practices "mandatory".

      Practices are like patterns, in that they are applied in response to the
      forces at hand. There are some that are quite commonly useful: Composed
      Method, perhaps, or Pair Programming. And there are some that are used less
      frequently, like Composite, or Readiness Assessment. Always, they are to be
      applied in response to the actual need, the actual forces, in the
      situation.


      Now imagine two packagings of the same practices, in two books. One book is
      called Enterprise Patterns for XP. The other is called Enterprise XP.

      I believe that these two books, even if their contents were identical,
      would be used differently. More importantly, I am concerned that if one set
      out to /write/ these two books, one would write them differently.

      To me, the one name says "Here is what you in Enterprise should do." The
      other says "Here are the things you should know how and when to use."

      Carthago delenda est.

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      It is a bad plan that admits of no modifications. -- Publius Syrus (ca. 42 BCE)
    • Adam Wildavsky
      At 7:58 AM -0400 5/1/04, Ron Cato Jeffries wrote: ... For those, like myself, who never learned Latin and know little history: Carthage must be destroyed.
      Message 2 of 4 , May 2, 2004
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        At 7:58 AM -0400 5/1/04, Ron "Cato" Jeffries wrote:

        ...

        >Carthago delenda est.

        For those, like myself, who never learned Latin and know little history:

        "Carthage must be destroyed."

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_Punic_War

        --
        Adam Wildavsky Extreme Programmer Tameware, LLC
        adam@... http://www.tameware.com
      • Stefan Schmiedl
        ... And Romani eunt domus (Life of Brian). It s Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam in the original version, which Cato was reportedly using as .sig
        Message 3 of 4 , May 2, 2004
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          Ron Jeffries (2004-05-01 07:58):

          >
          > Carthago delenda est.

          And "Romani eunt domus" (Life of Brian).

          It's "Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam" in the original version,
          which Cato was reportedly using as .sig in his speeches. Translation:

          BTW: F2k Carthago.

          SCNR

          s.
        • Dominic Williams
          ... Ron, this reminds me of the days before the white book came out, and XP was largely captured on Ward s Wiki, along with lots of other stuff. The boundaries
          Message 4 of 4 , May 6, 2004
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            Le 1 mai 04, à 13:58, Ron Jeffries a écrit :

            > So we have ten thousand things that among us we all know. Some of them
            > are
            > explicitly named in XP. Some of them go well with XP in this or that
            > situation; some do not. We pull these tricks from the bag in accord
            > with
            > our experience, our reading, our conversations with each other.
            > Sometimes
            > we even make up a new one.

            Ron, this reminds me of the days before the white book came out, and XP
            was largely captured on Ward's Wiki, along with lots of other stuff.
            The boundaries were not clear. This was good.

            I still use some tricks I read about back then, and first used thinking
            they were part of XP, later to discover they were not "core" XP...


            Dominic Williams
            http://www.dominicwilliams.net
            ----
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