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Appraisals in a company adopting XP

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  • Tony Byrne
    Folks, Probably related to the current thread on Extreme Salaries... It s annual appraisal time at my company and I m curious to know if anyone has had any
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 29 8:46 AM
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      Folks,

      Probably related to the current thread on Extreme Salaries...

      It's annual appraisal time at my company and I'm curious to know if
      anyone has had any specific experience of having to suggest their own
      performance criteria as a member of an XP team. I'm on the
      receiving end of the appraisal process, BTW.

      To give you some background, I'm the XP evangelist on team of two
      developers. The other developer is my boss and the person who will
      appraising me. So far, we've had only partial success in implementing
      XP. I wish to develop XP within the team, getting as close to canonical XP
      as we can, but I'm wary of suggesting performance criteria that I'm not in
      a position to control. Any ideas?

      Thanks,

      Regards,

      Tony.

      --
      Tony Byrne
    • Jeff Grigg
      ... I keep thinking that managers should be evaluated on how well they support and empowered their people. If my manager and I agree that I should sign up to
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 29 9:03 AM
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        Tony Byrne <yahoogroups@b...> wrote:
        > [...], I'm the XP evangelist on team of two developers.
        > The other developer is my boss and the person who will
        > appraising me. So far, we've had only partial success
        > in implementing XP. I wish to develop XP within the
        > team, getting as close to canonical XP as we can, but
        > I'm wary of suggesting performance criteria that I'm
        > not in a position to control. Any ideas?

        I keep thinking that managers should be evaluated on how well they
        support and empowered their people. If my manager and I agree that I
        should sign up to write a reusable framework that the company can
        sell and use, then I should expect some reasonable level of support
        in achieving this goal. But if I find that my boss is constantly
        pulling me off of that project, and vetoing every effort I make, then
        the failure is really theirs, not mine.

        So if you sign up to try 100%, but find that your pair partner, your
        boss, won't let you, then there should be some way to say that you
        are no longer responsible for doing things your boss forbids; it's
        their failure for preventing you from doing what you jointly agreed
        was the goal.
      • J. B. Rainsberger
        ... I have one question: you say you ve had only partial success in implementing XP. Is implementing XP your primary responsibility? How have you fared in
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 29 11:01 AM
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          Tony Byrne wrote:

          > Folks,
          >
          > Probably related to the current thread on Extreme Salaries...
          >
          > It's annual appraisal time at my company and I'm curious to know if
          > anyone has had any specific experience of having to suggest their own
          > performance criteria as a member of an XP team. I'm on the
          > receiving end of the appraisal process, BTW.
          >
          > To give you some background, I'm the XP evangelist on team of two
          > developers. The other developer is my boss and the person who will
          > appraising me. So far, we've had only partial success in implementing
          > XP. I wish to develop XP within the team, getting as close to canonical XP
          > as we can, but I'm wary of suggesting performance criteria that I'm not in
          > a position to control. Any ideas?

          I have one question: you say you've had only partial success in
          implementing XP. Is implementing XP your primary responsibility? How
          have you fared in helping to deliver the results your boss expects? The
          reason I ask goes back to the old standby: we're not in it to do XP;
          we're in it to write great software -- it just so happens that we think
          XP is the best way to make that happen.

          To answer your direct question, how have you positively impacted the
          company's bottom line? Where have you saved them money? Where have you
          generated revenue or revenue potential? Focus on those things and let
          your boss see/remember how you have contributed. Presumably that would
          help ensure that your performance is evaluated in a manner consistent
          with the company's objectives in hiring you: to help them make more money.

          Good luck!
          --
          J. B. Rainsberger,
          Diaspar Software Services
          http://www.diasparsoftware.com :: +1 416 791-8603
          Let's write software that people understand
        • Dale Emery
          Hi Tony, ... Last time I was an employee, I always tried to make feedback from my customers and colleagues the /primary/ criteria. Some managers liked that,
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 29 2:21 PM
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            Hi Tony,

            > It's annual appraisal time at my company and I'm curious to
            > know if anyone has had any specific experience of having to
            > suggest their own performance criteria as a member of an XP
            > team.

            Last time I was an employee, I always tried to make "feedback
            from my customers and colleagues" the /primary/ criteria. Some
            managers liked that, and they all were happy to make that
            feedback at least /part/ of the criteria.

            For each area of performance goals, I would (with my manager)
            identify who I was serving most directly, and specify feedback
            from those people (either by names or by position) as key
            performance criteria.

            Dale

            --
            Dale Emery -- Consultant -- Resistance as a Resource
            Web: http://www.dhemery.com
            Weblog: http://www.dhemery.com/cwd (Conversations with Dale)

            This is the sort of English up with which I will not put.
            --Winston Churchill
          • John Brewer
            Appraisal on an XP team is actually way easier than on a non-XP team: 1. Everyone has paired with everyone else. Ask the team members who s good, and who
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 29 4:26 PM
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              Appraisal on an XP team is actually way easier than on a non-XP team:

              1. Everyone has paired with everyone else. Ask the team members who's
              good, and who isn't.

              2. Everyone on the team has individually taken ownership for specific
              stories and/or tasks for each iteration. There are between 17 and 52
              iterations per calendar year. Each task is either completed or not,
              based on customer acceptance tests. So a manager can easily track
              who's signing up for which stories, and if those stories were actually
              completed as promised.

              As has been mentioned before, the results of an annual appraisal
              should just be a summary of the feedback received throughout the year.
              There shouldn't be any surprises, if both manager and employee have
              been paying attention throughout the year.
            • David Putman
              On the subject opf appraisals, here s a link to some automated team assessment and appraisal software I received recently. What are people s thoughts on this.
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 30 12:25 AM
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                On the subject opf appraisals, here's a link to some automated team
                assessment and appraisal software I received recently.
                What are people's thoughts on this.
                Personally, it would make me shiver if my boss were using software to
                automatically assess me.

                http://www.sourcewire.com/releases/rel_display.php?relid=XELmE

                Regards
                David Putman
                Exoftware
                Guinness Enterprise Centre
                Taylors Lane
                Dublin 8
                Ireland
                p: +353 (0)1 410 0528
                f: +353 (0)1 410 0520
                e: dputman@...
                w: http://www.exoftware.com
                w: http://www.davidputman.com
              • Paul Grew
                I cant see how a tool that encourages people to hide behind a PC will improve team work. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Message 7 of 10 , Apr 30 4:24 AM
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                  I cant see how a tool that encourages people to hide behind a PC will
                  improve team work.


                  > On the subject opf appraisals, here's a link to some automated team
                  > assessment and appraisal software I received recently.
                  > What are people's thoughts on this.
                  > Personally, it would make me shiver if my boss were using software to
                  > automatically assess me.
                  >
                  > http://www.sourcewire.com/releases/rel_display.php?relid=XELmE
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Tony Byrne
                  Hello J.B., Thursday, April 29, 2004, 7:01:37 PM, you wrote: JBR I have one question: you say you ve had only partial success in JBR implementing XP. Is
                  Message 8 of 10 , Apr 30 4:26 AM
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                    Hello J.B.,

                    Thursday, April 29, 2004, 7:01:37 PM, you wrote:

                    JBR> I have one question: you say you've had only partial success in
                    JBR> implementing XP. Is implementing XP your primary responsibility?

                    To be honest, probably not. I'm first and foremost a developer. However,
                    when I was hired, the company recognized that my previous experience of working
                    with a software development process would fill a gap in the team and could
                    be valuable as the team grew. So, responsibility for process improvement
                    and the introduction of development best practice was built into my
                    role. I came across XP and I 'got it'. After presenting it to the team, we
                    agreed that we should adopt it as our our development methodology.

                    JBR> How have you fared in helping to deliver the results your boss expects? The
                    JBR> reason I ask goes back to the old standby: we're not in it to do XP;
                    JBR> we're in it to write great software -- it just so happens that we think
                    JBR> XP is the best way to make that happen.

                    I work for a company that develops its own systems to support its
                    business. This company has never experienced a software project go
                    sour and so the value of "great software" is not well understood.

                    Our team is small and with or without XP it manages
                    to deliver functionality to the business at a rate that the business seems
                    happy with. So why do I continue to push XP? Well, because I don't
                    believe that the ad hoc approach is sustainable long term and I see XP
                    as a means of heading off trouble.

                    JBR> Good luck!

                    Thanks.

                    Regards,

                    Tony.

                    --
                    Tony Byrne
                  • Phlip
                    ... http://www.sourcewire.com/releases/rel_display.php?relid=XELmE As a programmer, I think I d know how to foil that, waltz around it, or just hack it if I
                    Message 9 of 10 , Apr 30 7:16 AM
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                      > > On the subject opf appraisals, here's a link
                      > > to some automated team
                      > > assessment and appraisal software I received
                      > > recently.
                      > > What are people's thoughts on this.
                      > > Personally, it would make me shiver if my
                      > > boss were using software to
                      > > automatically assess me.
                      > >
                      > >
                      http://www.sourcewire.com/releases/rel_display.php?relid=XELmE

                      As a programmer, I think I'd know how to foil that,
                      waltz around it, or just hack it if I got bored.

                      =====
                      Phlip
                      http://www.xpsd.org/cgi-bin/wiki?TestFirstUserInterfaces




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                    • J. B. Rainsberger
                      ... So part of your contribution to the organization is process improvement. In that case, it s reasonable that part of your evaluation depend on how well you
                      Message 10 of 10 , May 1, 2004
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                        Tony Byrne wrote:

                        > Hello J.B.,
                        >
                        > Thursday, April 29, 2004, 7:01:37 PM, you wrote:
                        >
                        > JBR> I have one question: you say you've had only partial success in
                        > JBR> implementing XP. Is implementing XP your primary responsibility?
                        >
                        > To be honest, probably not. I'm first and foremost a developer. However,
                        > when I was hired, the company recognized that my previous experience of working
                        > with a software development process would fill a gap in the team and could
                        > be valuable as the team grew. So, responsibility for process improvement
                        > and the introduction of development best practice was built into my
                        > role. I came across XP and I 'got it'. After presenting it to the team, we
                        > agreed that we should adopt it as our our development methodology.

                        So part of your contribution to the organization is process improvement.
                        In that case, it's reasonable that part of your evaluation depend on how
                        well you improve the company's processes. How much emphasis, in
                        percentage, do you think is reasonable to put on your process
                        improvement work, compared to your development work? (You don't have to
                        tell me, but you should think about it.)

                        > JBR> How have you fared in helping to deliver the results your boss expects? The
                        > JBR> reason I ask goes back to the old standby: we're not in it to do XP;
                        > JBR> we're in it to write great software -- it just so happens that we think
                        > JBR> XP is the best way to make that happen.
                        >
                        > I work for a company that develops its own systems to support its
                        > business. This company has never experienced a software project go
                        > sour and so the value of "great software" is not well understood.
                        >
                        > Our team is small and with or without XP it manages
                        > to deliver functionality to the business at a rate that the business seems
                        > happy with. So why do I continue to push XP? Well, because I don't
                        > believe that the ad hoc approach is sustainable long term and I see XP
                        > as a means of heading off trouble.

                        What opportunities are there to do XP in your organization. Typically
                        one only uses a new approach to solve problems or to experiment on
                        medium-sized projects. If you have neither opportunity, then how exactly
                        are you moving forward?

                        Take care.
                        --
                        J. B. Rainsberger,
                        Diaspar Software Services
                        http://www.diasparsoftware.com :: +1 416 791-8603
                        Let's write software that people understand
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