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RE: [XP] Re: Subsets of XP

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  • Peter Hansen
    ... I fail to see the distinction. Not having a process is not the fault of the team? Whose fault is it then? ... I have to agree with John Roth that XP is
    Message 1 of 57 , Apr 28, 2004
      Jim Shore [mailto:jshore@...] wrote:
      > Peter Hansen wrote:
      >
      > >A team that is capable of handling XP can adopt the XP practices
      > >one-by-one (or sometimes two at a time perhaps), without danger.
      > >[...] I don't see the big deal with not having certain practices
      > >on board at a certain stage of the conversion. *It's still better
      > >than the typical alternative."
      > >
      > Q: What's the difference between a team that fails due to no
      > development process and a team that fails due to incomplete XP process?
      >
      > A: In the second case, it's your fault.

      I fail to see the distinction. Not having a process is not the
      fault of the team? Whose fault is it then?

      > XP is hard. Change is hard. Spreading it out over time makes it all
      > much harder.

      I have to agree with John Roth that XP is NOT hard. Some people
      make it seem hard. Some people think that it's hard -- perhaps
      they aren't doing it right?

      Change is also easy, if you follow the XP principles.

      Spreading it out over time means making smaller changes to
      the process at each point rather than a whole bunch of changes,
      a "sea change", all at once. Some companies can afford inevitable
      impact of the latter (among them, probably a dead stop to productivity
      for a while as people adapt), but some cannot. In that sense
      at least it is *much* harder for some companies to change
      everything suddenly than it is to adopt useful practices one
      at a time.

      Perhaps the part about following principles is the key. If
      you have a team that tries to adopt the practices, either all
      at once or one by one, it will be very hard if they haven't
      accepted and committed mentally to working by the XP Principles.

      If a team follows the principles, however, I believe it can
      safely use either approach (as appropriate for its own situation)
      and succeed.

      If you disagree about adopting practices one at a time being
      hard, please describe when you tried that and what you found
      to be a problem. My team had great success with it without
      finding it hard at all.

      -Peter
    • Victor Goldberg, Ph.D.
      Yes, I am very impressed with him. Victor ... From: Ron Jeffries To: Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2004
      Message 57 of 57 , May 13, 2004
        Yes, I am very impressed with him.

        Victor


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Ron Jeffries" <jeffries@...>
        To: <extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2004 6:25 AM
        Subject: Re: Meta-Extreme Reading List (was Re: [XP] Re: Subsets of XP)


        > On Wednesday, May 12, 2004, at 11:29:13 PM, Steven J. Owens wrote:
        >
        > > So this prompts me to ask folks to post title, author and
        > > one-paragraph description of their favorite books of this sort.
        >
        > Here's one I've just started: Semler, /The Seven-Day Weekend/. Here's a
        > random article I googled just now:
        > http://www.inc.com/articles/2004/03/7dayweekend.html .
        >
        > Ron Jeffries
        > www.XProgramming.com
        > When all ideas of [XP] is and [XP] is not have been extinguished,
        > then [XP] reality will manifest itself. -- Thich Nhat Hanh [Ron Jeffries]
        >
        >
        >
        >
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