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RE: [XP] Big Visible Charts

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  • Alleman, Glen B.
    From our experience there is no good reason not to have machine built charts, they come for free from the PVCS, UT, and Earned Value tracking systems. What
    Message 1 of 49 , Mar 1, 2004
      From our experience there is no good reason not to have machine built
      charts, they come for free from the PVCS, UT, and Earned Value tracking
      systems. What seems to be missing form many-a a XP discussion is a
      context in which a reason might exist. If the culture of development is
      built around crayon drawn charts then fine, but of the culture is an
      engineering and design shop where CAD style charts are the "norm," then
      a machine generated BVC is also fine.

      BTW the BVC concept has little to do with XP. TRW Building 020 1 Space
      Park Redondo Beach, 1976 had BVC's all over the place for project
      progress of Cobra Dane - a multi-million line Fortran application. When
      you walked down the hall in the morning you could see the progress of
      the builds from the night before, your name on the schedule, the
      progress to plan and the goals for the next build.

      Like all good ideas they keep coming back for the next generation.

      Glen B. Alleman


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Edmund Schweppe [mailto:schweppe@...]
      Sent: Monday, March 01, 2004 9:32 AM
      To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [XP] Big Visible Charts

      Doug Swartz wrote:

      > Sunday, February 29, 2004, 2:18:08 PM, Edmund Schweppe wrote:
      >>On the other hand, I'm not ready to buy a claim that it's *inherently*
      >>better to do one's BVCs manually - because I can see some definite
      value
      >>in generating them automatically under certain circumstances.
      >>Maybe you could say some more about why it's *inherently* better to do

      >>them manually...
      > We have one project manager who, from my perspective, is quite
      > 1n1l retentive. We managed to inherit one of those big
      > DesignJet printers from a failed Internet start-up that the
      > corporation bought. This project manager has gotten in the
      > habit of periodically printing some of the BVCs for the
      > project she's on. They look gorgeous!
      > And... I hate them! To me, they're sterile, and much less
      > believable than the hand-written ones, with new scribbles
      > layered on each day to show progress.

      I might be a little bit concerned about team dynamics if charts
      automatically generated by the team were considered less believable than

      charts manually generated by the team.

      On the other hand, I was looking for reasons (other than pure
      efficiency, which I thought to be rather weak) for preferring hand-built

      BVCs over automatically-generated ones, and now I've heard several. Now
      I know more than I did a few days ago. Which, as Ron's automatic .sig
      generator is so fond of noting, is a good thing.

      Ron, might I suggest you include some of these reasons in your BVC page?

      --
      Edmund Schweppe -- schweppe@... -- http://schweppe.home.tiac.net
      The opinions expressed herein are at best coincidentally related to
      those of any past, present or future employer.



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    • Jeff Grigg
      ... This certification is a business requirement. The documentation /necessary/ to achive this certification is a legitimate business requirement. An XP team
      Message 49 of 49 , Mar 1, 2004
        >>-----Original Message-----
        >>From: Ron Jeffries [mailto:ronjeffries@a...]
        >>[...]
        >>Please give an example where agility is more costly than
        >>whatever the opposite of agility is.

        --- "Glen B. Alleman" <galleman@n...> wrote:
        > Here's one,
        >
        > I'm building (at I did) a TMR fault tolerant process control
        > computer. The hardware and the software need to be certified
        > by TUV and SINTEF before they can be used in offshore and
        > process safety applications. The code and schematics need
        > to be published in all their glory along with all the fault
        > injection and partial diagnostic coverage theory and
        > results. This all needs to be packaged up and sent to the
        > certification agencies.
        >
        > In the XP world (assuming the ultimate agile process) I'd
        > have to send the development team to Trondheim Norway and
        > Bergen Germany in place of the docs. They would then
        > explain in detail how all the hardware and software worked
        > to the certification agencies, then fly home after the 3
        > month verification.

        This certification is a business requirement. The
        documentation /necessary/ to achive this certification is a
        legitimate business requirement. An XP team can and must produce
        the required documentation, as requested by User Stories, at the
        time that the Customer considers them to provide the greatest
        business value.

        I would speculate that an XP team would ideally produce most of such
        required documentation in the last half of the project, rather than
        in the first half. If you do it too early, then the cost of
        maintaining the documentation and redoing analysis after refactoring
        will be higher.


        On the other hand, with respect to technical documentation requests,
        I've been in plenty of situations where technical managers push for
        *lots* of technical documentation up-front out of *fear* and based
        on *speculation* that some unknown auditors in the future might "be
        impressed" by such documentation and refrain from hurting us. But
        I've found that successful delivery of quality software to the
        business users can often serve as a good defense in such situations.


        > The trade off will be "docs" compliant with the certif-
        > ication submission, or people living in Norway and
        > Germany for 3 months, two translators, food, phone
        > calls home, wives, girl and boy friends sent to Europe
        > for conjugal visits etc.

        I've been wanting to visit Germany, and I hear that Norway is
        pretty. ;->
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