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RE: [XP] Can patterns be harmful?

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  • Tim Haughton (OmniBus - Stanford)
    ... They can be. That doesn t mean they always are. If GoF design patterns are used too early, they can rob the developer of the opportunity to do the simplest
    Message 1 of 107 , Feb 2, 2004
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      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Alan Shalloway [mailto:alshall@...]
      >
      >
      > Can Patterns Be Harmful?
      >

      They can be. That doesn't mean they always are.

      If GoF design patterns are used too early, they can rob the developer of the opportunity to do the simplest thing possible. On the other hand, if I had say a non functional requirement, lets say I was wanted to insulate some code from changing from using a DB to a flat file system, I might be tempted to 'look' at say a Bridge upfront. Although I'd still be on the lookout for an easier way.

      Usually, I find GoF design patterns to be more useful in the past tense. Kinda like "Hey look, I did a Visitor," rather than "OK we need to do a Visitor."

      Regards,

      Tim Haughton
      .NET Analyst Programmer

      "Do you pine for the nice days of minix-1.1, when men were men and wrote their own device drivers? " -- Linus Torvalds

      Omnibus Systems Ltd
      www.omnibus.tv
    • andy_ipaccess
      ... times. I ve ... them do it ... the ... down to ... questions? ... I have and do. Even with my professional background in being a mentor and lead, being
      Message 107 of 107 , Feb 8, 2004
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        --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, George Dinwiddie
        <programminglists@a...> wrote:
        > Andrew McDonagh wrote:
        > > Over the 8 months we have been 'doing' XP I've tried many, many
        times. I've
        > > come to the conclusion that actively trying to steer them is
        > > counter-productive. The resistance increases when I push.
        > >
        > > This year, I've decided to take the hands-off approach. I let
        them do it
        > > anyway they want and leave it fully in their hands. They 'know'
        the
        > > practises and I've explained them fully many times, so its really
        down to
        > > whether they follow them or not.
        >

        > When explaining produces resistance, have you tried asking
        questions?
        >
        > - George

        I have and do.

        Even with my professional background in being a mentor and lead,
        being human I fail too sometimes. This tends tobe dur to annoyance of
        having to describe the practises, their benefits and interactions for
        the n'th time. In these situations I tend to 'tell' rather than
        show. No a good approach, I'd admit.
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