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Re: [XP] value of splitting stories (was: My first trial run at the Planning Game)

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  • Ron Jeffries
    ... We have a WINNER!!!!! Just what I was thinking -- and well-described as well! When people make up stories, especially small ones, they get more and more
    Message 1 of 242 , Jan 1, 2004
      On Thursday, January 1, 2004, at 11:06:53 AM, Jeff Grigg wrote:

      > If you subscribe to the 80/20 rule -- that 80% of the value comes
      > from 20% of the work -- then "very good" splitting of stories could
      > split the 80% of work that provides 20% of the value from the 20% of
      > work that provides 80% of the value. Do the smaller and more
      > valuable story first. Your productivity, as measured by business
      > value produced per dollar (or hour), will increase four fold.

      We have a WINNER!!!!! Just what I was thinking -- and well-described as
      well!

      When people make up stories, especially small ones, they get more and more
      focused on solution, and less and less on problems. When we're in a
      situation where we need to get creative with our use of time, taking an
      overall look back at the real objectives, taking high-level stories and
      teasing them apart, we often get the effect you describe.

      In the iteration plan, this can happen, if there's enough give and take
      between the customers and programmers. But -- especially if we're thinking
      in terms of one day iterations -- there isn't much time for that kind of
      conversation. The release plan gives us an opportunity to look at the big
      picture, observe where we're in trouble, and schedule time to come up with
      something creative to do.


      We have now seen a number of ways in which the overview provided by release
      planning provides for a better solution to a tight-resource situation --
      and even a better use of resources when we have all the time and money we
      need -- than just doing what seems like the next most important thing.

      And that's why I wouldn't drop it from the practices, especially for folks
      new to doing XP.

      Well done, Jeff! Your prize is in the [e-]mail!

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      Accept your conditions, but not your fate. -- Rod Walsh & Dan Carrison
    • Ilja Preuss
      ... It probably also results in stories of different priorities. So you might happen to only implement part of the original story in those three months. Take
      Message 242 of 242 , Jan 19, 2004
        J. B. Rainsberger wrote:

        > Split the stories. The usual effect is that our fear-based estimates
        > are replaced with shorter, more realistic ones. This gets us more
        > features, because we reduce the effect of our tendency to
        > over-estimate.

        It probably also results in stories of different priorities. So you
        might happen to only implement part of the original story in those three
        months.

        Take care, Ilja
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