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value of splitting stories (was: My first trial run at the Planning Game)

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  • Jeff Grigg
    ... The value of the large story will be split between the two new stories. And the cost will also be split. If the system is highly maintainable, then
    Message 1 of 242 , Jan 1, 2004
      >>>>Choose the simplest features?

      >>> Those might all be valueless.

      > --- J. B. Rainsberger wrote:
      >> Split the stories. The usual effect is that our fear-
      >> based estimates are replaced with shorter, more
      >> realistic ones. This gets us more features, because
      >> we reduce the effect of our tendency to over-estimate.

      --- Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@X...> wrote:
      > Very close, Joe, very close. What else happens when we
      > split stories? What happens to relative value and
      > relative cost?

      The value of the large story will be split between the two new
      stories. And the cost will also be split.

      If the system is highly maintainable, then there's no particular
      reason why the total cost or value of the new stories would be any
      more or less than the original story. But that doesn't imply that
      cost and value will be evenly distributed among the new stories.
      Some stories might be more or less costly than others, and they might
      be more or less valuable too.

      If you subscribe to the 80/20 rule -- that 80% of the value comes
      from 20% of the work -- then "very good" splitting of stories could
      split the 80% of work that provides 20% of the value from the 20% of
      work that provides 80% of the value. Do the smaller and more
      valuable story first. Your productivity, as measured by business
      value produced per dollar (or hour), will increase four fold.

      As for the large volume of ("busy") work that produces very little
      value... Put it off until later. Maybe you'll never get around to
      doing it. And that's not necessarily a bad thing. ("How about
      never? Does never work for you?" --
      http://www.users.nac.net/jmp/humor/phrases.html ;-)
    • Ilja Preuss
      ... It probably also results in stories of different priorities. So you might happen to only implement part of the original story in those three months. Take
      Message 242 of 242 , Jan 19, 2004
        J. B. Rainsberger wrote:

        > Split the stories. The usual effect is that our fear-based estimates
        > are replaced with shorter, more realistic ones. This gets us more
        > features, because we reduce the effect of our tendency to
        > over-estimate.

        It probably also results in stories of different priorities. So you
        might happen to only implement part of the original story in those three
        months.

        Take care, Ilja
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