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Re: best way to identify points of diminishing returns

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  • Dale Emery
    Hi Steve, ... I no longer think of plans as being about the future. I see them as being about the /present/, about our current intentions and expectations.
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 31, 2003
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      Hi Steve,

      > I think my skepticism about future planning comes from years
      > and years of software development experience where folks
      > invested even more effort into release planning than XP
      > condones, and yet still folks never seemed to make useful
      > predictions about the future.

      I no longer think of plans as being about the future. I see them
      as being about the /present/, about our current intentions and
      expectations. Planning makes our current intentions and
      expectations available to public scrutiny, so that we can explore
      them as a team and decide, as a team, what will be our next
      steps, given our current intentions and expectations.

      Making our current intentions and expectations visible also helps
      us learn from what happens. As time passes, we compare what
      happened to our plans (our now /past/ intentions and
      expectations). The similarities and differences give us
      information about the models we were using to guide our
      intentions and expectations, and we can use that information to
      reinforce or adjust the models we're using now.

      For me, in order to be valuable, planning (or any other activity)
      doesn't have to be perfect. It just has to give me more value
      than not doing it. Planning creates value for me by making my
      thinking available for scrutiny in the present and for evaluation
      and improvement in the future.

      Dale

      --
      Dale Emery -- Consultant -- Resistance as a Resource
      Web: http://www.dhemery.com
      Weblog: http://www.dhemery.com/cwd (Conversations with Dale)

      All modesty is false, otherwise it's not modesty. --Alan Bennett
    • Dale Emery
      Hi Steve, I had planned to include this link in my earlier post: http://www.dhemery.com/cwd/2003/11/plan_for_the_present.html Dale -- Dale Emery -- Consultant
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 31, 2003
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        Hi Steve,

        I had planned to include this link in my earlier post:
        http://www.dhemery.com/cwd/2003/11/plan_for_the_present.html

        Dale

        --
        Dale Emery -- Consultant -- Resistance as a Resource
        Web: http://www.dhemery.com
        Weblog: http://www.dhemery.com/cwd (Conversations with Dale)

        I want to know why, if men rule the world, they don't stop
        wearing neckties. --Linda Ellerbee
      • Doug Swartz
        ... Have you or your friend tried this? I have. In the early 90 s I worked for a telemarketing company. Every IT person had to go through the basic 5 day class
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 31, 2003
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          Wednesday, December 31, 2003, 2:05:50 PM, Steve Howell wrote:


          > I had a friend who had an interesting theory about software development.
          > He said that the software developer should always have to do the
          > customer's job for a while, and then the software developer would simply
          > use his computer skills to automate away the most odious tasks. That to
          > me seems like the ultimate lightweight, human-based approach to software
          > development.

          Have you or your friend tried this? I have. In the early 90's
          I worked for a telemarketing company. Every IT person had to
          go through the basic 5 day class for taking phone calls. At
          the end of training, we each took a half hour of phone calls
          (with supervisors close at hand, just like new telemarketers).
          The ideas and improved software which resulted were well worth
          the time invested (At that time, 1 second saved off the
          average phone call was worth $100,000 per year to the bottom
          line).



          --

          Doug Swartz
          daswartz@...
        • Steve Howell
          ... I haven t really had the opportunity to try it, but I hope to some day. ... Cool story.
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 31, 2003
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            Doug Swartz wrote:

            >Wednesday, December 31, 2003, 2:05:50 PM, Steve Howell wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >>I had a friend who had an interesting theory about software development.
            >>He said that the software developer should always have to do the
            >>customer's job for a while, and then the software developer would simply
            >>use his computer skills to automate away the most odious tasks. That to
            >>me seems like the ultimate lightweight, human-based approach to software
            >>development.
            >>
            >>
            >
            >Have you or your friend tried this?
            >
            I haven't really had the opportunity to try it, but I hope to some day.

            >I have. In the early 90's
            >I worked for a telemarketing company. Every IT person had to
            >go through the basic 5 day class for taking phone calls. At
            >the end of training, we each took a half hour of phone calls
            >(with supervisors close at hand, just like new telemarketers).
            >The ideas and improved software which resulted were well worth
            >the time invested (At that time, 1 second saved off the
            >average phone call was worth $100,000 per year to the bottom
            >line).
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            Cool story.
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