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RE: [XP] XP and Religion

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  • Dave Rooney
    ... Amen. I came to XP through an epiphany after working for 2.5 years on a Death March project (though it actually shipped something to production... late,
    Message 1 of 215 , Nov 1, 2003
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: J. B. Rainsberger [mailto:jbrains@...]
      > Sent: Saturday, November 01, 2003 9:25 AM
      > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [XP] XP and Religion
      >
      >
      > Ron Jeffries wrote:
      >
      > > On Friday, October 31, 2003, at 7:56:59 PM, J. B. Rainsberger wrote:
      > >
      > >>So here are the opposing forces.
      > >>1. I would never write seriously about how to do XP, since I haven't
      > >>done enough XP.
      > >>2. Since I haven't done enough XP, I have to follow XP by the book
      > >>before I bend it.
      > >>3. If I don't bend XP, apparently I am dogmatic and
      > therefore not Agile.
      > >>Stop the ride... I want to get off.
      > >
      > > Thing is, whatever we know, there is stuff outside. What we know
      > > provides some stability in the fact of change in what we
      > do. There is
      > > always some possible change, some possible difference from what we
      > > know, that seems to be more than our skills are sure to
      > stabilize. So
      > > we fear to go there. We become dogmatic.
      >
      > I don't know that I see that as dogmatic, unless I'm just not able to
      > separate the book definition of the term from the emotionally-charged
      > one I have in my head.
      >
      > cautious == dogmatic?
      >
      > > To step far outside one's capabilities, into /real/ danger? Is that
      > > courage, or stupidity? I think it's stupidity. I'm brave
      > enough to go
      > > a bit beyond where I've been before ... but I won't go /there/.
      >
      > ...certainly not all once, anyway. Bit by bit, perhaps. But
      > as I wrote
      > previously, I want to feel some damn success first. That's why I got
      > into XP in the first place: it looked like a path down which I could
      > find success. I want that. I'm greedy that way.
      >
      > After I've succeeded a few times, then it's on to the Next
      > Big Thing, I
      > guess.
      > --

      Amen. I came to XP through an epiphany after working for 2.5 years on a
      Death March project (though it actually shipped something to
      production... late, well over budget, and nowhere near what the Customer
      wanted).

      Using XP, I have been very successful. We have shipped the system that
      the Customer wanted on time, on budget, and with minimal or no reported
      defects from production.

      I don't really care what people think of the methodology I use as long
      as I'm shipping good code to happy Customers. If there are enough of
      those happy Customers, they won't care what methodology I use either.

      Dave Rooney
      Mayford Technologies
      http://www.mayford.ca
    • xp@darksleep.com
      Hi all, Just thougth I d throw in an XP-relevant comment on this thread. My weight has hovered just around 270lbs since high school, even when I was doing
      Message 215 of 215 , Nov 19, 2003
        Hi all,

        Just thougth I'd throw in an XP-relevant comment on this thread.

        My weight has hovered just around 270lbs since high school, even
        when I was doing martial arts seven days a week, even when I was doing
        capoeira (a highly physical, acrobatic martial art involving
        cartwheels and flips and the like). My fat/muscle balance changed,
        certainly (I sink like a rock in water), but my weight stayed the
        same.

        Oddly enough, my weight went *up* when I left a large corporate
        environment for a small startup where we did pair programming. I
        spent much more time sitting and coding, and much less time
        cubicle-crawling and schlepping to meetings.

        Of course, the fact that I traded the big corporate urban
        environs of the big coporate office for startup suburbia, and went
        from walking 5-10 blocks to an asian restaruant for lunch to hopping
        in the car and drove down the road to the greasy spoon, may have had
        something to do with it too :-).

        --
        Steven J. Owens
        puff@... / (412) 401-8060 cell / (412) 578-9817 house
        | "I'm going to make broad, sweeping generalizations and strong,
        | declarative statements, because otherwise I'll be here all night and
        | this document will be four times longer and much less fun to read.
        | Take it all with a grain of salt."
        | - me, at http://darksleep.com
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