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Re: Embedded XP, was Re: XP assumption, was Re: [XP] "Code must be commented"

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  • Ron Jeffries
    ... Cool, send money or clients! (I have given up going to SD, as it has seemed never to produce even the slightest hint of business. I m glad something good
    Message 1 of 185 , Oct 1, 2003
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      On Wednesday, October 1, 2003, at 1:43:28 AM, Nancy Van Schooenderwoert wrote:

      > That's a tall order. I'll tell you almost EVERYTHING and let you ask
      > further about the areas that interest you. First, I want to thank you,
      > Ron - I attended your XP talk at SD west in spring of 2000, and that's
      > when I turned on to XP.

      Cool, send money or clients! (I have given up going to SD, as it has seemed
      never to produce even the slightest hint of business. I'm glad something
      good came out of it.)

      > ... once we began delivering usable code at regular
      > intervals, management was impressed.

      This seems to me to be key in many situations. A lot of skepticism
      disappears when real software starts coming out.

      > The key practices we added to deal with the embedded realities were:

      > * Leave a bread crumb trail - a trouble log that is always "on" so it
      > doesn't distort your troubleshooting by having to be enabled.

      Yes. I can think of many times when I'd have been better off to leave the
      logging on. In a file-based situation it often seemed too inefficient. I
      like your idea of the dumpable circular buffer, and suspect it could be
      used to good effect even in non-embedded systems.

      > * Dual targetting. Make your app run on a desktop as well as on the
      > target CPU to isolate board-specific problems.

      > * Stand-alone module execution. Each loosely-coupled domain of the app
      > should build and execute alone on either target.

      Big agreement on these as well. It seems that as complexity increases,
      speed of developing software decreases more than proportionately. So
      smaller modules have a very significant effect on velocity. (And quality,
      and flexibility and ...)

      > ...I also taught them
      > all I knew about multitasking - another skill that was absent from all
      > the staff except me. The funny thing is that the worst multitasking
      > problem we had was a deadlock that held us up for a few hours, and it
      > was my bug.

      It's good that you led the way in all things. ;->

      > Ron Morsicato (a team member) and I wrote an article for Cutter's IT
      > Journal last year about our experience. Here's a link (it was mentioned
      > in a previous posting by Charles Poole) --
      > http://www.cutter.com/itjournal/xp.html

      Good article -- I had somehow missed it. Thanks!

      > There will be more articles (and possibly a book) forthcoming about
      > Embedded XP.

      That would be outstanding. If you would ever care to put something on
      XProgramming.com, you would be welcome. Not much money in it, but on the
      other hand, fame is overrated. ;->

      Good stuff, thanks!

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      Talent determines how fast you get good, not how good you get. -- Richard Gabriel
    • jrb32002
      ... Mu, another person jumping to conclusions. ;-) I grant you, a running project which is cancelled when nothing in the environment has changed could indeed
      Message 185 of 185 , Oct 6, 2003
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        --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Grigg"
        <jeffgrigg@c...> wrote:

        > Another failed XP project.

        Mu, another person jumping to conclusions. >;-) I grant you, a
        running project which is cancelled when nothing in the environment has
        changed could indeed be a failed project -- more often it's really a
        management failure to put resources to better use. Cancelling a
        running project when the environment changes so as to invalidate the
        purpose of the project is neither project success nor failure, it's
        *management* success.

        Joseph Beckenbach
        lead XP tester
        Eidogen, Inc.
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