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Re: [XP] Gender and diversity

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  • Victor
    Interesting example, Mary. ... Even in the worst educational systems, there are individuals that succeed to beat the system and make significnt contributions
    Message 1 of 19 , Aug 30 5:36 AM
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      Interesting example, Mary.

      > Toyota's ability to import its management style successfully into
      > other countries would indicate that the education system is not a
      > particularly large factor in one's ability to adopt a participatory
      > management style

      Even in the worst educational systems, there are individuals that succeed to
      beat the system and make significnt contributions to the world. The
      question is, should the educational system be in the way of creativity and
      inclusiveness, or support these traits? The totality of society could look
      very different in each case.

      Example: At about the same time the Vatican tried to keep Galileo quiet,
      England and Holand had societies society more open to the discussion of new
      ideas. England produced Newton and Darwin and a long list of less known,
      yet very important scientists, and Holland produced many of the tools that
      facilitated research in that period of time, like telescopes. It's not that
      those societies were ideal according to modern standards, but the difference
      between the two models was big enough to make a difference in the results.
      The British American colonies inherited the British openness to new ideas
      (again, nothing is perfect; remember the witches of Salem) and became the
      most creative nation in the world.

      A question could be asked, why to improve on the good? My answer is that
      the value of the expected outcome justifies relentless refactoring..

      There are islands of excellent education already. It is good that people of
      all ideologies support education. The more the merrier. What I am
      advocating here is equal opportunity of access to good education by all
      sectors of society. The expectation is that the more thinking brains we
      have, and the more diverse these brains are, the more society will benefit
      from their contribution. For example, there are a lot of programmers
      already. Wouldn't it be nice if there would be more good programmers,
      locally?

      The economy has cycles of boom and bust. For some it may seem that there is
      an oversupply in almost any profession right now. However, the main hope to
      better ride the next boom is to have enough brain power to support the
      boom's development needs. Maybe with enough brain power we could even find
      a way to avoid or minimize the following bust.

      Victor

      ===================================================

      I can't draw any parallels between a country's education system and
      its management practices, but I can say that friends from Japan have
      told me that Toyota's style of doing things is unique, even in Japan.
      However, Toyota's management practices are replicatable, and have
      been replicated in Toyota facilities the US. See for example: "The
      Role of Management in a Lean Manufacturing Environment" at
      http://www.sae.org/topics/leanjul01.htm.

      Toyota's ability to import its management style successfully into
      other countries would indicate that the education system is not a
      particularly large factor in one's ability to adopt a participatory
      management style. Quoting from the article above:
      "...the role of management in a healthy, thriving, work environment.
      [is to] shape the organization not through the power of will or
      dictate, but rather through example, through coaching and through
      understanding and helping others to achieve their goals." Gary
      Convis, President, Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky. He is the
      first American president of a Toyota vehicle manufacturing plant
      (anywhere in the world).
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