Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Newbie questions on XP

Expand Messages
  • leonnewsgroup
    Hi there, In the traditional development of a project, we should apply the OOA and OOD to the project for generating an architecture for the project. In the
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 2, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi there,

      In the traditional development of a project, we should apply the OOA
      and OOD to the project for generating an architecture for the
      project. In the XP, customers make user stories to the development
      teams, developers do the estimation on the stories and then do the
      implementations of the user stories. My questions are:
      Who and when is the architecture of the project generated? What can
      OOA do in the XP? Does a developer do the OOA/OOD after he or she is
      assigned tasks?

      Thanks.

      Leon
    • William Pietri
      Hi, Leon. Those are good questions. ... In XP, we do analysis, design, and architecture all the time. That s because every line of code we write translates
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 2, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi, Leon. Those are good questions.

        On Sat, 2003-08-02 at 07:41, leonnewsgroup wrote:
        > My questions are:
        > Who and when is the architecture of the project generated? What can
        > OOA do in the XP?

        In XP, we do analysis, design, and architecture all the time. That's
        because every line of code we write translates user needs (analysis)
        into objects (design) that must fit into a bigger program
        (architecture).

        Now obviously, the balance will shift around. During a planning game, I
        focus more on analysis, but in doing the estimates I have to think about
        architecture and design. And when I'm pounding out code I'm mainly
        focused on low-level design, but I still have to keep user needs and the
        broad structure of the code in mind. When I'm refactoring, my
        attention's mostly on the architecture, but as an expression of my
        analysis of the problem domain.

        > Does a developer do the OOA/OOD after he or she is
        > assigned tasks?

        In my experience at least, nobody assigns tasks in XP. The customer
        tells us what their most important desires are, and the team figures out
        how much of that they can do this week. Then the developers divide up
        the tasks in whatever way seems fun and fair. I often hear, "Oooh, I
        want to try that." Or, "I had to work on the legacy code last week. It's
        somebody else's turn to hurt their brain."

        But that aside, the design happens both before and after a developer
        picks up a task.

        William

        --
        brains for sale: http://scissor.com/
      • Chris Hanson
        ... Software developers practicing XP aren t assigned tasks. They choose which tasks to work on collaboratively with the other developers. Also, there is no
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 2, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          On Saturday, August 2, 2003, at 09:41 AM, leonnewsgroup wrote:
          > Who and when is the architecture of the project generated? What can
          > OOA do in the XP? Does a developer do the OOA/OOD after he or she is
          > assigned tasks?

          Software developers practicing XP aren't assigned tasks. They choose
          which tasks to work on collaboratively with the other developers.

          Also, there is no such thing as "the object-oriented analysis" or "the
          object-oriented design" as a physical artifact or as a distinct stage
          of development. Object-oriented analysis and design are practiced
          continuously as you develop software, and expressed in the way you
          write the code and tests implementing the software.

          It's the same thing with architecture: The architecture of a software
          is a property of the software, not a document, not a separate stage of
          development. It is refined continuously over the development of the
          software, and expressed (again) in the code itself.

          There is a lot less make-work and busy-work in projects using agile
          methodologies.

          -- Chris

          --
          Chris Hanson, bDistributed.com, Inc. | Email: cmh@...
          Custom Mac OS X Development | Phone: +1-847-372-3955
          http://bdistributed.com/ | Fax: +1-847-589-3738
          http://bdistributed.com/Articles/ | Personal Email: cmh@...
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.