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Anyone heard about this study?

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  • William E Caputo
    Heard on National Public Radio this AM a blurb about a piece that will run on their MarketPlace show this evening about a new study that shows brain-wave
    Message 1 of 17 , Jul 31, 2003
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      Heard on National Public Radio this AM a blurb about a piece that will run
      on their MarketPlace show this evening about a new study that shows
      brain-wave activity of fatigued brains is the same as sleeping brains. It
      was entitled "working 9 to 5 and only 9 to 5" (or something like that).

      Anyone hear of it? Sounds like a sound argument for the "Sustainable Pace"
      practice of XP.

      Best,
      Bill

      William E. Caputo
      ThoughtWorks, Inc.
      --------
      "Its the foolish cat that looks at the finger when it is pointing at the
      food"
    • Ron Jeffries
      ... Marketplace isn t produced by NPR, though they carry it. The site shows a short blurb for the piece: http://www.marketplace.org/ . Looks like they put the
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 31, 2003
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        On Thursday, July 31, 2003, at 9:28:49 AM, William E Caputo wrote:

        > Heard on National Public Radio this AM a blurb about a piece that will run
        > on their MarketPlace show this evening about a new study that shows
        > brain-wave activity of fatigued brains is the same as sleeping brains. It
        > was entitled "working 9 to 5 and only 9 to 5" (or something like that).

        > Anyone hear of it? Sounds like a sound argument for the "Sustainable Pace"
        > practice of XP.

        Marketplace isn't produced by NPR, though they carry it. The site shows a
        short blurb for the piece: http://www.marketplace.org/ .

        Looks like they put the shows up on line. I hope so!!

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        Hold on to your dream. --ELO
      • Chris Dollin
        ... Not heard of it - but I ve recently read Counting Sheep , about the science of sleep, [Google] by Paul Martin, ISBN 0006551726, which makes points about
        Message 3 of 17 , Jul 31, 2003
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          On Thursday 31 July 2003 14:28, William E Caputo wrote:
          > Heard on National Public Radio this AM a blurb about a piece that will run
          > on their MarketPlace show this evening about a new study that shows
          > brain-wave activity of fatigued brains is the same as sleeping brains. It
          > was entitled "working 9 to 5 and only 9 to 5" (or something like that).
          >
          > Anyone hear of it? Sounds like a sound argument for the "Sustainable Pace"
          > practice of XP.

          Not heard of it - but I've recently read "Counting Sheep", about the science
          of sleep, [Google] by Paul Martin, ISBN 0006551726, which makes points
          about how much less sleep than we need Westerner's are getting and how
          sleep deprivation is bad for your judgement and health. Not just for
          missing lots of nights, or a single night; chronic sleep deprivation (eg
          loss of an hour a night, say) messes you up more than you might expect.

          Of course you can over-work and still get plenty of sleep ... but does anyone?

          --
          Chris "attempting sleep recovery [but not this instant]" Dollin
          C FAQs at: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/by-newsgroup/comp/comp.lang.c.html
          C welcome: http://www.angelfire.com/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc.html
        • andy.glew@amd.com
          ... Back when I was a bachelor, or when my wife and daughter are travelling without me, I probably over-work, and still get enough sleep. Back in the day I
          Message 4 of 17 , Jul 31, 2003
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            > Of course you can over-work and still get plenty of sleep ...
            > but does anyone?

            Back when I was a bachelor,
            or when my wife and daughter are travelling without me,
            I probably over-work, and still get enough sleep.

            Back in the day I would work 14-16 hour days,
            and sleep 8-10 hours a night. Even deducting
            1-2 hours/day for meals, that may mean 60+ hours
            actually at the work site.

            Getting enough exercise is a different matter.
            Back in the day I walked or biked to work.
            I would spend the daylight hours, one or two days
            a week (often, but not always, weekends), windsurfing.
            (And sleep like a log those nights, and still get
            time to do a bit of work on those days off.)
            Nowadays I sit on a recumbent exercise bike and read
            - email, manuals, patents, etc.

            (One of the annoying things about XP, I find, is that
            there is less reading to do - more of XP needs to be
            done at the actual computer. Much less reading of BDUF
            design documents. So, less work related stuff to do
            on the exercise bike. I've tried using my computer
            on the exercise bike, but can't get into it.)

            ---

            I'm probably a very boring work-absorbed person.

            I have lots of outside intellectual interests
            (esp. politics and economics) but I don't pursue
            them too much.

            But, you know, I really love my job. I eat, drink,
            think and dream computer architecture.

            By the way, also related: I think that I need more sleep
            than the average: I like to sleep at least 8, and sometimes
            10, hours per night. This is common in my family:
            my sister is a 10 hr/night sleeper, and she is a real
            overachiever (you can catch her radio show in Canada,
            which she does on top of a vet practice, on top of teaching,
            on top of ...). Similarly my brother.

            I'll sometimes sleep 16-20 hours if I've worked a late stint.
            (One of the first things I do when my family travels, leaving
            me at work, is sleep well into Saturday. And then go to work.)

            I'm an active dreamer. I often solve work problems in my dreams.
            (Maybe I should bill some of my REM time to work?)

            I need more sleep than most people; I feel that sleep is one
            of the things that helps me be creative. So, I adjust my schedule
            to work a lot and still sleep a lot.
            (Something gives. I don't watch TV.)

            ---

            When my family is at home I probably work less ;-{,
            exercise less :-(, and sleep less :-(,
            but laugh and smile more :-).
          • Anne & Larry Brunelle
            Corollary questions: o How much does it hurt to work too hard/long at a stretch (even assuming adequate sleep)? I find that by working on some kinds of things
            Message 5 of 17 , Jul 31, 2003
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              Corollary questions:
              o How much does it hurt to work too hard/long
              at a stretch (even assuming adequate sleep)?
              I find that by working on some kinds of things
              and then literally sleeping on it, I sometimes
              come back the next day (or even later, because
              of weekends, other tasks, etc.) and see a better,
              simpler way. I speculate that continued "work"
              activity inhibits the back-brain stuff at
              least sometimes. How long is too long and how
              do you tell? Id it significant to get that extra
              time-out and revisit even if the task is small?
              o Conversely (and perhaps perversely), when is it
              GOOD to stay on task for extra hours? I recall
              certain times that continued concentration really
              seemed to help (and even was perhaps unavoidable -
              when you're at the stage you code in your dreams,
              and that on your present project). Not for long,
              though. I'm thinking the applicable case was when
              the overall design was clear in my mind but the
              implementation was knotty. (Again, I'm assuming
              adequate sleep, at least averaged over several days.)
              o When does this issue become the personal analog of
              a process smell?


              andy.glew@... wrote:
              >>Of course you can over-work and still get plenty of sleep ...
              >>but does anyone?
              >
              >
              > Back when I was a bachelor,
              > or when my wife and daughter are travelling without me,
              > I probably over-work, and still get enough sleep.
              >
              > Back in the day I would work 14-16 hour days,
              > and sleep 8-10 hours a night. Even deducting
              > 1-2 hours/day for meals, that may mean 60+ hours
              > actually at the work site.
              >
              > Getting enough exercise is a different matter.
              > Back in the day I walked or biked to work.
              > I would spend the daylight hours, one or two days
              > a week (often, but not always, weekends), windsurfing.
              > (And sleep like a log those nights, and still get
              > time to do a bit of work on those days off.)
              > Nowadays I sit on a recumbent exercise bike and read
              > - email, manuals, patents, etc.
              >
              > (One of the annoying things about XP, I find, is that
              > there is less reading to do - more of XP needs to be
              > done at the actual computer. Much less reading of BDUF
              > design documents. So, less work related stuff to do
              > on the exercise bike. I've tried using my computer
              > on the exercise bike, but can't get into it.)
              >
              > ---
              >
              > I'm probably a very boring work-absorbed person.
              >
              > I have lots of outside intellectual interests
              > (esp. politics and economics) but I don't pursue
              > them too much.
              >
              > But, you know, I really love my job. I eat, drink,
              > think and dream computer architecture.
              >
              > By the way, also related: I think that I need more sleep
              > than the average: I like to sleep at least 8, and sometimes
              > 10, hours per night. This is common in my family:
              > my sister is a 10 hr/night sleeper, and she is a real
              > overachiever (you can catch her radio show in Canada,
              > which she does on top of a vet practice, on top of teaching,
              > on top of ...). Similarly my brother.
              >
              > I'll sometimes sleep 16-20 hours if I've worked a late stint.
              > (One of the first things I do when my family travels, leaving
              > me at work, is sleep well into Saturday. And then go to work.)
              >
              > I'm an active dreamer. I often solve work problems in my dreams.
              > (Maybe I should bill some of my REM time to work?)
              >
              > I need more sleep than most people; I feel that sleep is one
              > of the things that helps me be creative. So, I adjust my schedule
              > to work a lot and still sleep a lot.
              > (Something gives. I don't watch TV.)
              >
              > ---
              >
              > When my family is at home I probably work less ;-{,
              > exercise less :-(, and sleep less :-(,
              > but laugh and smile more :-).
              >
              >
              > To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...
              >
              > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
              >
              > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.com
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
            • David Boyer
              ... Interesting, I hadn t thought of trying this. I don t have an exercise bike. What I do is run every night or bike. I take my son with me (3 year old) and
              Message 6 of 17 , Jul 31, 2003
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                andy.glew@... wrote:

                >I've tried using my computer on the exercise bike, but can't get into it.)
                >

                Interesting, I hadn't thought of trying this. I don't have an exercise
                bike.

                What I do is run every night or bike. I take my son with me (3 year
                old) and I wear headphones on an mp3 player. I burn my own cd's off of
                the internet and have recently been creating mp3's from online books,
                using a speech synthesis application. Not very good, but it's
                intelligible. No worse than listening to stephen hawking's history of
                the universe on a CD. I also listen to them on my 2 hours a day
                commuting...

                Cheers,

                David B.

                PS. I love my job too.
              • Phlip
                ... That paragraph was written by an engineer. I can tell. It riffs straight from walking with a 3yo kid to defraying the impact of 2 hours a day commuting
                Message 7 of 17 , Jul 31, 2003
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                  David Boyer wrote:


                  > Interesting, I hadn't thought of trying this. I don't have an exercise
                  > bike.
                  >
                  > What I do is run every night or bike. I take my son with me (3 year
                  > old) and I wear headphones on an mp3 player. I burn my own cd's off of
                  > the internet and have recently been creating mp3's from online books,
                  > using a speech synthesis application. Not very good, but it's
                  > intelligible. No worse than listening to stephen hawking's history of
                  > the universe on a CD. I also listen to them on my 2 hours a day
                  > commuting...

                  That paragraph was written by an engineer. I can tell. It riffs straight
                  from walking with a 3yo kid to defraying the impact of 2 hours a day
                  commuting using self-generated mp3s. Would people persons have focussed on
                  the kid?

                  Try this:

                  I catch up on my sleep on weekends. Studies have show you live longer if you
                  do that. But last weekend I had a preconscious experience. My daughter (8yo)
                  was in the room messing with the strap to my backpack. She was scolding me,
                  "You need to take better care of your backpack staps!". Whatever.

                  So come Monday I put my notebook (actually my job's notebook) into my
                  backpack, slung the backpack on by one strap, and head for the car to start
                  my 1 hour inbound commute.

                  The strap came loose, and the backpack fell off. The corner of my notebook's
                  monitor hit first.

                  At work, I noticed that corner has two ripples in the gel they use to make
                  notebooks, and it has about 100 missing pixels. No gaps wider than a
                  millimeter, but the gel now wobbles and vibrates easily there.

                  I check with my office-mate, who requisition the notebook for me, to make
                  sure it was still under warrantee. I can work around this problem for a
                  while, then send the notebook in for a new monitor. Unless they have a
                  backpack strap clause or something.

                  But over the next few days a curious thing happened. Each time I turn the
                  notebook off and let it cool, when I turn it back on a few pixels have grown
                  back!

                  We are now down to maybe 50 missing pixels! The two ripples are still there,
                  but I can live with those. (I'l replace the monitor anyway, on principle.)

                  So the moral of the story: Sleep is good for you. It lets your
                  phosphorescent pixel gels anneal themselves.

                  --
                  Phlip
                  http://www.greencheese.org/LucidScheming
                  -- Ask about our Venture Capital
                  ignition outsourcing services --
                • andy.glew@amd.com
                  ... When I do my 20 minute car commute, I obviously don t compute. Me, I listen to NPR or the BBC. When I take the bus, as I did today (1 hour on bus, + 40
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jul 31, 2003
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                    > I also listen to them [MP3s] on my 2 hours a day
                    > commuting...

                    When I do my 20 minute car commute, I obviously
                    don't compute. Me, I listen to NPR or the BBC.

                    When I take the bus, as I did today
                    (1 hour on bus, + 40 minutes walking, plus wait time)
                    I use my tablet PC and, mainly, read and delete email,
                    although occasionally I compose email and/or write code.
                    Hard too write code on the bus when I am pairing strictly.


                    > I catch up on my sleep on weekends. Studies have show you
                    > live longer if you do that.

                    Partly so... but the version I have heard (I believe on
                    NPR pop sci radio) is that it doesn't work out like that.
                    You cannot make up for a sleep deficit through the weekend.
                    Some of the damage is irreversible.
                  • Asim Jalis
                    On Thu, Jul 31, 2003 at 04:13:00PM -0700, andy.glew@amd.com ... Even if you don t live longer it might feel that way; your net wakeful life might still be
                    Message 9 of 17 , Jul 31, 2003
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                      On Thu, Jul 31, 2003 at 04:13:00PM -0700, andy.glew@...
                      wrote:
                      > > I catch up on my sleep on weekends. Studies have show you
                      > > live longer if you do that.
                      >
                      > Partly so... but the version I have heard (I believe on NPR pop
                      > sci radio) is that it doesn't work out like that. You cannot
                      > make up for a sleep deficit through the weekend. Some of the
                      > damage is irreversible.

                      Even if you don't live longer it might feel that way; your net
                      wakeful life might still be longer: hours awake per day * days
                      alive.


                      Asim
                    • Phlip
                      ... Y all are missing a detail: I don t do all-nighters, either, and I don t set an alarm clock without a reason. Sleep is SUCH a totally effective debugging
                      Message 10 of 17 , Jul 31, 2003
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                        > > > I catch up on my sleep on weekends. Studies have show you
                        > > > live longer if you do that.
                        > >
                        > > Partly so... but the version I have heard (I believe on NPR pop
                        > > sci radio) is that it doesn't work out like that. You cannot
                        > > make up for a sleep deficit through the weekend. Some of the
                        > > damage is irreversible.
                        >
                        > Even if you don't live longer it might feel that way; your net
                        > wakeful life might still be longer: hours awake per day * days
                        > alive.

                        Y'all are missing a detail: I don't do all-nighters, either, and I don't set
                        an alarm clock without a reason.

                        Sleep is SUCH a totally effective debugging and bug-preventing technique!

                        --
                        Phlip
                        http://www.c2.com/cgi/wiki?PhlIp
                        -- Please state the nature of the programming emergency --
                      • Chris Dollin
                        ... And non-sleep such an effective bug-introduction and time-wasting tactic. The referred-to-book says that one of the effects of sleep deprivation is loss of
                        Message 11 of 17 , Aug 1, 2003
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                          On Friday 01 August 2003 01:13, Phlip wrote:

                          > Y'all are missing a detail: I don't do all-nighters, either, and I don't
                          > set an alarm clock without a reason.
                          >
                          > Sleep is SUCH a totally effective debugging and bug-preventing technique!

                          And non-sleep such an effective bug-introduction and time-wasting tactic.
                          The referred-to-book says that one of the effects of sleep deprivation is
                          loss of judgement (experience says: oh yes) and, drat, forgot the term,
                          fixing/monomania/locking: you get stuck in a particular pattern and can't
                          get out (experience says: oh YES).

                          At home we're making a deliberate effort to take sufficient sleep. This
                          morning, for the first working day in quite a while, I woke before my
                          alarm. [Perhaps because Mr Cat didn't wake us at 4am "Purr! Purr! I
                          love you! Purr! Listen to me scratch the carpet! I'd like to go hunt now!
                          Purr!"]

                          --
                          Chris "electric hedgehog\\\\\\\\cat-victim" Dollin
                          C FAQs at: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/by-newsgroup/comp/comp.lang.c.html
                          C welcome: http://www.angelfire.com/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc.html
                        • Ian Collins
                          ... One has to learn the art of getting up and walking away from a problem. I ve lost count of the number of bugs fixed while sitting in the little boys room!
                          Message 12 of 17 , Aug 1, 2003
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                            >
                            >
                            >o Conversely (and perhaps perversely), when is it
                            > GOOD to stay on task for extra hours? I recall
                            > certain times that continued concentration really
                            > seemed to help (and even was perhaps unavoidable -
                            > when you're at the stage you code in your dreams,
                            > and that on your present project). Not for long,
                            > though. I'm thinking the applicable case was when
                            > the overall design was clear in my mind but the
                            > implementation was knotty. (Again, I'm assuming
                            > adequate sleep, at least averaged over several days.)
                            >

                            One has to learn the art of getting up and walking away from a problem.
                            I've lost count of the number of bugs fixed while sitting in the little
                            boys room!

                            Tip - drink lots of water or tea, then you are forced to walk away on a
                            regular basis.

                            To answer the question, when you are on a roll. I'm happy for my people
                            to work a 10+ hour day, provided they don't go over 40 for the week too
                            often.

                            Does anyone know of any studies on subconscious problem solving? I hear
                            plenty of anecdotal evidence and I have several personal experiences.
                            I'm sure someone must have studied it.

                            Ian
                          • yahoogroups@jhrothjr.com
                            ... From: Ian Collins To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                            Message 13 of 17 , Aug 2, 2003
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                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: "Ian Collins"
                              <masuma.ian.at.quicksilver.net.nz@...>
                              To: "extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com"
                              <extremeprogramming.at.yahoogroups.com@...>
                              Sent: Friday, August 01, 2003 7:54 PM
                              Subject: Re: [XP] Anyone heard about this study?


                              > >
                              > >
                              > >o Conversely (and perhaps perversely), when is it
                              > > GOOD to stay on task for extra hours? I recall
                              > > certain times that continued concentration really
                              > > seemed to help (and even was perhaps unavoidable -
                              > > when you're at the stage you code in your dreams,
                              > > and that on your present project). Not for long,
                              > > though. I'm thinking the applicable case was when
                              > > the overall design was clear in my mind but the
                              > > implementation was knotty. (Again, I'm assuming
                              > > adequate sleep, at least averaged over several days.)
                              > >
                              >
                              > One has to learn the art of getting up and walking away from a problem.
                              > I've lost count of the number of bugs fixed while sitting in the little
                              > boys room!
                              >
                              > Tip - drink lots of water or tea, then you are forced to walk away on a
                              > regular basis.
                              >
                              > To answer the question, when you are on a roll. I'm happy for my people
                              > to work a 10+ hour day, provided they don't go over 40 for the week too
                              > often.
                              >
                              > Does anyone know of any studies on subconscious problem solving? I hear
                              > plenty of anecdotal evidence and I have several personal experiences.
                              > I'm sure someone must have studied it.

                              The way I understand it, the brain can operate in a rather large number
                              of configurations; that is, it has different patterns of activation and
                              information
                              flow depending on what it's doing. When we're stuck on a problem, the
                              current patterns aren't capable of handling it. When we move off and do
                              something else, we change the activation patterns, and sometimes that,
                              by itself, is enough to solve it.

                              This is what pair programming does for us. One of the two people is
                              in "creative" mode, writing code, and the other is in "critic" mode,
                              analyzing the code that's being written to see if it works, if it will do
                              the job it's intended to do, whether there are code smells, and on and
                              on and on.

                              It's impossible for one person to do both at once effectively. Some
                              people can switch back and forth easily enough that they can write
                              some code and then critique it before they hit the compile button.
                              Most of us can't, or find that switching that rapidly is very fatiguing.

                              Unconcious (not subconcious, please!) problem solving simply
                              means that the actual process isn't in concious awareness. There are
                              lots of things going on in the brain that aren't in most people's
                              awareness. That's one of the things that makes it difficult to analyze
                              properly: introspection depends on being concious of your own
                              process, and becoming concious of your process interferes with it.

                              John Roth


                              >
                              > Ian
                              >
                              >
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                            • John D. Mitchell
                              ... [...] ... Improving on a bad situation may be an improvement but that doesn t imply that it s objectively good . I.e., cutting down to 1 pack of
                              Message 14 of 17 , Aug 7, 2003
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                                >>>>> "andy" == andy glew <andy.glew@...> writes:
                                [...]

                                >> I catch up on my sleep on weekends. Studies have show you live longer if
                                >> you do that.

                                Improving on a bad situation may be an improvement but that doesn't imply
                                that it's objectively "good". I.e., cutting down to 1 pack of cigarettes
                                per day is arguably an improvement for a 2 pack per day smoker but that's
                                still bad for you.

                                > Partly so... but the version I have heard (I believe on NPR pop sci
                                > radio) is that it doesn't work out like that. You cannot make up for a
                                > sleep deficit through the weekend. Some of the damage is irreversible.

                                Indeed!

                                What's more, this "catch-up" approach is an interesting mirror of the "I'm
                                on a diet" mindset. The yo-yo-ing is, itself, damaging.


                                Now, for Ron and some other folks on the list who are into "eastern"
                                things, there are an increasing number of western style studies that are
                                validating the beneficial phsyiological effects of "meditation" (be it
                                traditional sitting or "meditation in movement" ala tai chi).

                                It goes without saying that I leave the integration of those two threads as
                                an exercise for the reader. :-? :-)

                                Mu,
                                John
                              • Phlip
                                ... if ... I repeat: I don t do all nighters, I aim for 8.5 hours sleep per night, and I don t set an alarm clock without a reason. And
                                Message 15 of 17 , Aug 7, 2003
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                                  > >> I catch up on my sleep on weekends. Studies have show you live longer
                                  if
                                  > >> you do that.
                                  >
                                  > Improving on a bad situation may be an improvement but that doesn't imply
                                  > that it's objectively "good". I.e., cutting down to 1 pack of cigarettes
                                  > per day is arguably an improvement for a 2 pack per day smoker but that's
                                  > still bad for you.

                                  I repeat: I don't do all nighters, I aim for 8.5 hours sleep per night, and
                                  I don't set an alarm clock without a reason. >And< I catch up on sleep on
                                  weekends.

                                  Y'all are projecting!

                                  > Now, for Ron and some other folks on the list who are into "eastern"
                                  > things, there are an increasing number of western style studies that are
                                  > validating the beneficial phsyiological effects of "meditation" (be it
                                  > traditional sitting or "meditation in movement" ala tai chi).

                                  There are also studies that show drinking beer and watching the tube are
                                  good for you!

                                  --
                                  Phlip
                                  http://www.greencheese.org/MayorZogg
                                  -- Programming without Tan Lines, LLC --
                                • John D. Mitchell
                                  ... [...] ... Nope. By definition, if you need to catch up on sleep on the weekends then you are NOT getting enough rest during the week. It s irrelevent
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Aug 7, 2003
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                                    >>>>> "Phlip" == Phlip <plumlee@...> writes:
                                    [...]

                                    >> Improving on a bad situation may be an improvement but that doesn't
                                    >> imply that it's objectively "good". I.e., cutting down to 1 pack of
                                    >> cigarettes per day is arguably an improvement for a 2 pack per day
                                    >> smoker but that's still bad for you.

                                    > I repeat: I don't do all nighters, I aim for 8.5 hours sleep per night,
                                    > and I don't set an alarm clock without a reason. >And< I catch up on
                                    > sleep on weekends.

                                    > Y'all are projecting!

                                    Nope. By definition, if you need to "catch up" on sleep on the weekends
                                    then you are NOT getting enough rest during the week.

                                    It's irrelevent what the specific number of hours of "sleep" that you are
                                    getting during the week since that's a highly individual thing and there
                                    are many types of sleep disorders that insidiously rob us of real rest.


                                    >> Now, for Ron and some other folks on the list who are into "eastern"
                                    >> things, there are an increasing number of western style studies that are
                                    >> validating the beneficial phsyiological effects of "meditation" (be it
                                    >> traditional sitting or "meditation in movement" ala tai chi).

                                    > There are also studies that show drinking beer and watching the tube are
                                    > good for you!

                                    Hmm... Those studies are easy to falsify (rigorously).

                                    Sweet dreams,
                                    John
                                  • Asim Jalis
                                    ... Plus it has the flavor of phased/waterfall process. Saving up your sleep for the weekend smells like leaving all the testing for the end of the project.
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Aug 7, 2003
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                                      On Thu, Aug 07, 2003 at 08:22:31AM -0700, John D. Mitchell wrote:
                                      > Andy Glew <andy.glew@...> writes:
                                      > > Partly so... but the version I have heard (I believe on NPR
                                      > > pop sci radio) is that it doesn't work out like that. You
                                      > > cannot make up for a sleep deficit through the weekend. Some
                                      > > of the damage is irreversible.
                                      >
                                      > Indeed!
                                      >
                                      > What's more, this "catch-up" approach is an interesting mirror
                                      > of the "I'm on a diet" mindset. The yo-yo-ing is, itself,
                                      > damaging.

                                      Plus it has the flavor of phased/waterfall process. Saving up
                                      your sleep for the weekend smells like leaving all the testing
                                      for the end of the project.


                                      Asim
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