Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

FWD: Freedom over Agile?

Expand Messages
  • Brad Appleton
    Anybody here have any familiarity with Rick L. or his Freedom methodology? I went to his website to find out more, but I don t see any whitepapers or
    Message 1 of 4 , May 16, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Anybody here have any familiarity with Rick L. or his "Freedom" methodology? I went to his website to find out more, but I don't see any whitepapers or anything. Its a bunch of information about courses you have to register for. (In depth information about freedom doesn't seem to be freely available from what I can see). Freedom claims to be service-oriented and quality driven, does seem to focus heavily on requirements (tho the info at the Freedom URL below talks about thinking of requirements in a completely different way that "makes OOA and Use-Cases obsolete" and encapsulates requirements in code-objects (how different is that from FIT or Fitnesse?)
      --
      Brad Appleton <brad@...> www.bradapp.net
      Software CM Patterns (www.scmpatterns.com)
      Effective Teamwork, Practical Integration
      "And miles to go before I sleep." -- Robert Frost


      ----- Forwarded message from Rick Lutowski <rick@...> -----
      The reference in Glen's reply postulates some traits of an
      agile infrastructure that are worth quoting:

      Building an adaptable infrastructure revolves around three
      directives: build for speed of change, leverage flexible
      technologies, organize around critical skills.
      ..
      Enterprises built for change will emerge reinforcing service,
      relationships, intimacy, experience, and brand.
      ..
      IT has to enable radically different enterprise
      relationships, capabilities, processes, and partnerships -
      ones that demand agility, flexibility, and free-flowing
      sharing of information.

      Unfortunately, no guidance is offered on how to accomplish
      these goals. However, I am aware of one thing that does.
      It is called "Freedom."

      Freedom is a development methodology that reduces to practice
      the agile principles in the first quote. Freedom is focused on
      building software for ease and speed of change. Thus, it is
      one of the "flexible technologies" being recommended. Learning
      Freedom provides "critical skills" needed to specify requirements
      for ease and speed of change. Organizing software around such
      requirements helps make the software itself more flexible.

      As suggested in the last quote, new process are needed. Freedom
      is one of these. You may not have heard of Freedom before
      because it is a very recent arrival on the corporate scene. Only
      this week did NASA grant formal permission to release it publicly.
      Now that it is officially out from 'behind closed doors,' this
      space-age software development process can be used by everyone
      to accomplishes many of the goals to which Agile is committed.

      To learn a little more about Freedom, see
      http://www.jreality.com/products_freedom.html

      If you are interested in the details of how to apply Freedom
      to the development of agile software requirements and agile
      software, seriously consider taking the 5 day course. It
      covers key topics critical to agile thinking, such as
      (1) What are requirements? (VERY important!) and
      (2) How to encapsulate requirements in code objects to
      improve ease of change of requirements, especially after release.

      Agile is a great set of principles, but to date lacks a concrete
      systematic process for accomplishing them. Freedom is the first
      process on the scene to fill this need in the requirements and
      design area. It is a good front-end companion to XP, which is
      good on the back end for coding and testing. The two together
      can be the genesis of a concrete, systematic agile process for
      software.

      --
      Rick Lutowski
      Principal, JReality
      rick@...
      www.jreality.com
    • Jeff Grigg
      ... They ve discovered encapsulation. And interfaces. The gist of it, which I get from the course outlines and sample slides, is... When you re doing
      Message 2 of 4 , May 16, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        > ----- Forwarded message from Rick Lutowski <rick@j...> -----
        > To learn a little more about Freedom, see
        > http://www.jreality.com/products_freedom.html


        They've discovered encapsulation.
        And interfaces.

        The gist of it, which I get from the course outlines and sample
        slides, is... "When you're doing BigDesignUpFront, be sure to hide
        each requirement and design decision behind an abstract interface.
        That way, when anything changes, you need only change the
        implementation of that requirement or decision in the implementation
        class, and nothing else in the system need change."

        How they would go about accomplishing this seems rather ill-defined
        to me.

        Course content for developers:
        http://www.jreality.com/freedom_trg/RED/00_05.html
        Note the heavy requirements gathering focus.

        See encapsulation on their "Information-hiding" page:
        http://www.jreality.com/freedom_trg/RED/01_04.html

        On this page
        http://www.jreality.com/freedom_trg/RED/02_05.html
        they say that drivers hide hardware differences, and that classes can
        encapsulate data structures and algorithms, but that there is no
        current technology to encapsulate Behavior. This must be the
        shortfall that "Freedom" addresses. (But I must question if they've
        heard of any of the behavioral Design Patterns -- like Strategy.)


        Agile? I see no reason to believe that what they're doing could be
        called agile.
        - jeff
      • Brad Appleton
        ... Based on Rick Lutowski s posts on the new agileinfrastructure Yahoo group, he seems to contrast freedom with agile and would agree with what you say
        Message 3 of 4 , May 16, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          On Fri, May 16, 2003 at 05:39:04PM -0000, Jeff Grigg wrote:
          > Agile? I see no reason to believe that what they're doing could be
          > called agile.

          Based on Rick Lutowski's posts on the new "agileinfrastructure" Yahoo group, he seems to contrast "freedom" with "agile" and would agree with what you say above. His posts suggests Freedom has fixed some holes/gaps in agile (e.g. being developer/code-driven rather than "quality-driven").

          From what I see, it appears like the agile emphasis on people and interactions is missing, and the focus on requirements docs and BDUF is emphasized, and I worry that Freedom's use of "quality-driven" is less like TDD and more like "process and tool over individuals and interactions")

          --
          Brad Appleton <brad@...> www.bradapp.net
          Software CM Patterns (www.scmpatterns.com)
          Effective Teamwork, Practical Integration
          "And miles to go before I sleep." -- Robert Frost
        • Keith Ray
          ... The multi-color text and the repetition of Save you time and money makes me think of spam. And this bit - Only this week did NASA grant formal
          Message 4 of 4 , May 16, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            >>
            >> To learn a little more about Freedom, see
            >> http://www.jreality.com/products_freedom.html

            The multi-color text and the repetition of "Save you time and money"
            makes me think of spam.

            And this bit -

            "Only this week did NASA grant formal permission to release it
            publicly."

            - this sounds like a spammer's lie to me. If NASA (not a NASA
            contractor) created intellectual property like a description of a
            methodology, then I'm pretty sure it would be in the public domain and
            accessible for a low cost in some manner.

            In particular, a software development methodology document would
            probably be required reading by NASA contractors and be available from
            the government printing office (if you knew the name of the document to
            ask for).

            Check out <http://bookstore.gpo.gov/sb/sb-308.html>

            NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. BOOK. 1995. Provides: useful
            information to system engineers and project managers; a generic
            description of NASA systems engineering which can be supported by
            center-specific documents; a common language and perspective of the
            systems engineering process; and a reference work which is consistant
            with NMI (NASA management instruction) 7120.4/NHB (NASA handbook)
            7120.5. Approaches systems engineering from a systems perspective,
            starting at mission needs and conceptual studies through operations and
            disposal. 166 p.; ill. 0-16-061848-7
            NAS 1.21:6105
            S/N 033-000-01156-3 -- $25.00


            Also do a keyword search on this page
            <http://www.access.gpo.gov/su_docs/locators/cgp/index.html>
            ("nasa and software and freedom" has 1 documents):

            Research in software allocation for advanced manned mission
            communications and tracking systems : final report. Microfiche. 1990.
            Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. NAS 1.26:188114. [[0830-H-14 (MF)]].
            Rank: 1000 Locate Libraries , [Short Record] , [Full Record]

            --
            C. Keith Ray
            <http://homepage.mac.com/keithray/blog/index.html>
            <http://homepage.mac.com/keithray/xpminifaq.html>
            <http://homepage.mac.com/keithray/resume.html>



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.