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Story cards on a Wiki

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  • Willem Bogaerts
    In the thread Losing Story Cards , somebody mentioned the possibility of keeping the stories in a wiki. That sounds interesting. Does anybody have any
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 2 5:04 AM
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      In the thread "Losing Story Cards", somebody mentioned the possibility of keeping the stories in a wiki. That sounds interesting. Does anybody have any experience with this?

      Best regards,
      Willem Bogaerts


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    • Dmitri Colebatch
      ... at a place I worked at last year we did this. each story had its own page, linked to from the page for the iteration that it was part of. stories only
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 2 5:08 AM
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        > In the thread "Losing Story Cards", somebody mentioned the
        > possibility of keeping the stories in a wiki. That sounds
        > interesting. Does anybody have any experience with this?

        at a place I worked at last year we did this. each story had its own page,
        linked to from the page for the iteration that it was part of. stories only
        got put on the wiki when they were scheduled in an iteration, and we also
        tracked estimated and actual programming hours spent as well as any other
        comments.

        worked really well I thought.

        we also had teh cards, which lived in a room, pinned to a wall with a big
        sign "cards do not leave this room"... we never lost any cards (o:

        cheers
        dim
      • Kiel Hodges
        ... possibility of keeping the stories in a wiki. That sounds interesting. Does anybody have any experience with this? ... Yes, I did this with a distributed
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 2 6:02 AM
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          --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Willem Bogaerts"
          <wbogaerts@c...> wrote:
          > In the thread "Losing Story Cards", somebody mentioned the
          possibility of keeping the stories in a wiki. That sounds
          interesting. Does anybody have any experience with this?
          >
          > Best regards,
          > Willem Bogaerts

          Yes, I did this with a distributed quasi-XP project. Each story had
          a page with a short description where we occasionally added extra
          notes. And we had a planning page that listed outstanding stories in
          priority order with sizes and separated into planned iterations.

          It served us well, but I haven't subsequently used that approach for
          co-located projects.

          Kiel Hodges
          SelfSo Software
        • Chris Morris
          ... keeping the stories in a wiki. That sounds interesting. Does anybody have any experience with this? I use it on my one-developer, weird customer, XP-ish
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 2 6:15 AM
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            > In the thread "Losing Story Cards", somebody mentioned the possibility of
            keeping the stories in a wiki. That sounds interesting. Does anybody have
            any experience with this?

            I use it on my one-developer, weird customer, XP-ish situation. I use a
            custom Wiki written in Ruby (clWiki @ http://clabs.org/scrpware.htm if you
            care...). Lately I've fallen into this pattern:

            --------------------------------------------------
            //ProjectAMainPage

            /ReleasePlan103
            /UnorderedStories
            --------------------------------------------------
            //ProjectAMainPage/ReleasePlan103

            StoryADoThis
            StoryBDoThis
            --------------------------------------------------
            //ProjectAMainPage/StoryADoThis

            This is the guts of this story. blah blah.
            --------------------------------------------------
            //ProjectAMainPage/StoryBDoThis

            This story is the result of a bug. see
            //ProjectAMainPage/IncidentBase/20030326UserBb
            --------------------------------------------------
            //ProjectAMainPage/UnorderedStories

            StoryCDoThis
            StoryMDoThis
            StoryDDoThis
            --------------------------------------------------

            When it's time for a new release, I make a new release page, move the
            stories from UnorderedStories to the new release page. There's also a main
            release page which 'archives' links to all ReleasePlanXxx pages.

            Of course, you could rename UnorderedStories -> OrderedStories -- I handle a
            number of projects simultaneously, so we're not really in active continuous
            development on any of them -- anything not right around the corner from a
            release is thrown back in the Unordered page.

            Wiki works much better for me than cards, because I've got a few different
            projects. In one more important project, we're always coming up with new
            story ideas, but there just might be a long time between idea and doing it.
            I feel better having the Wiki than some card floating around my desk which
            might get lost.

            Of course, we'll probably end up with a Wiki filled with things we don't
            really need to do :)

            Chris
            http://clabs.org
          • gurney5
            I m currently keeping story cards on a Wiki for a project I m working on; view the Wiki for the project here:
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 2 6:33 AM
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              I'm currently keeping story cards on a Wiki for a project I'm working
              on; view the Wiki for the project here:

              http://www.stun-software.com/wiki/wiki.pl?ContractTycoon

              All the User Stories are on a single page, where each story is given
              an ID number and separated by a horizontal line. Programmer Tasks
              are also all on a single page, given an ID number and tied to a User
              Story ID number. Example:

              [8] Change the Teams page so that it's a two-dimensional grid rather
              than a list. (from UserStory #3)

              I'm the only one actually coding, but several others are helping me
              to gather requirements. It's a game, which we're demoing to a
              variety of potential players, so having the stories on a Wiki helps
              us all be able to add story cards and collaborate on such things
              easily.
            • Alex Chaffee / Purple Technology
              ... FitNesse, a wiki-cum-test-harness, is doing this. http://fitnesse.org/FitNesseDevelopment.FrontPage http://fitnesse.org/FitNesseDevelopment.StoryList
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 2 8:56 AM
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                On Wed, Apr 02, 2003 at 03:04:42PM +0200, Willem Bogaerts wrote:
                >
                > In the thread "Losing Story Cards", somebody mentioned the
                > possibility of keeping the stories in a wiki. That sounds
                > interesting. Does anybody have any experience with this?

                FitNesse, a wiki-cum-test-harness, is doing this.

                http://fitnesse.org/FitNesseDevelopment.FrontPage

                http://fitnesse.org/FitNesseDevelopment.StoryList

                http://fitnesse.org/FitNesseDevelopment.FinishedStories

                Looks like they're doing it right!

                This seems very appropriate for a distributed project. It also might
                help with a problem our evening XP group has had: we're bad at keeping
                track of statistics like velocity and anecdotal progress reports. If
                it were all on a wiki, we would get some stats automatically, and
                others we'd be reminded to add while updating story status.

                --
                Alex Chaffee mailto:alex@...
                Purple Technology - Code and Consulting http://www.purpletech.com/
                jGuru - Java News and FAQs http://www.jguru.com/alex/
                Gamelan - the Original Java site http://www.gamelan.com/
                Stinky - Art and Angst http://www.stinky.com/
              • William Pietri
                ... I ve done in on one project where the team was distributed. Here s what I noticed: Pros: * Easy access from anywhere, * As free-form as index cards, *
                Message 7 of 11 , Apr 2 4:40 PM
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                  On Wed, 2003-04-02 at 05:04, Willem Bogaerts wrote:
                  > In the thread "Losing Story Cards", somebody mentioned the possibility
                  > of keeping the stories in a wiki. That sounds interesting. Does
                  > anybody have any experience with this?


                  I've done in on one project where the team was distributed. Here's what
                  I noticed:

                  Pros:
                  * Easy access from anywhere,
                  * As free-form as index cards,
                  * Simple structure helped prevent over-elaboration,
                  * Relatively easy to use, and
                  * Version history is interesting.

                  Cons:
                  * Harder to use than index cards,
                  * Non-programmers require some training,
                  * Can't point to wiki pages or wave them around,
                  * Cumbersome to change during physical meetings,
                  * People tend to make printouts, which become stale.


                  In the end, it was very hard to get the customer managing the Wiki.
                  (Something like FitNesse might have helped, but I'm not sure of that.)
                  Personally, I'd go with cards over a Wiki whenever the situation
                  allowed. But for a distributed team, a Wiki is miles better than just
                  e-mailing stuff hither and yon.

                  William

                  --
                  brains for sale: http://scissor.com/
                • Phlip
                  ... * Because they are not 3 x 5, they may fill up with stream-of-consciousness technobabble that s fun to write and causes brain damage to read. -- Phlip
                  Message 8 of 11 , Apr 2 5:12 PM
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                    > Cons:
                    > * Harder to use than index cards,
                    > * Non-programmers require some training,
                    > * Can't point to wiki pages or wave them around,
                    > * Cumbersome to change during physical meetings,
                    > * People tend to make printouts, which become stale.

                    * Because they are not 3 x 5, they may fill up with stream-of-consciousness
                    technobabble that's fun to write and causes brain damage to read.

                    --
                    Phlip
                    http://www.c2.com/cgi/wiki?PhlIp
                    -- The plasma signature at the end of the
                    wormhole is an approaching warbird --
                  • Edmund Schweppe
                    ... Well, just make people use PDAs to enter the WikiCards. (Without benefit of keyboard, of course.) Stream-of-consciousness and Graffitti don t mix :-) --
                    Message 9 of 11 , Apr 2 5:21 PM
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                      Phlip wrote:
                      >
                      > > Cons:
                      > > * Harder to use than index cards,
                      > > * Non-programmers require some training,
                      > > * Can't point to wiki pages or wave them around,
                      > > * Cumbersome to change during physical meetings,
                      > > * People tend to make printouts, which become stale.
                      >
                      > * Because they are not 3 x 5, they may fill up with stream-of-consciousness
                      > technobabble that's fun to write and causes brain damage to read.

                      Well, just make people use PDAs to enter the WikiCards. (Without benefit
                      of keyboard, of course.)

                      Stream-of-consciousness and Graffitti don't mix :-)

                      --
                      Edmund Schweppe -- schweppe@... -- http://schweppe.home.tiac.net
                      The opinions expressed herein are at best coincidentally related to
                      those of any past, present or future employer.
                    • Karl Scotland
                      ... I have that pattern with a small variation. We have an iterations page where the ordered stories across different projects are grouped
                      Message 10 of 11 , Apr 3 4:17 AM
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                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: Chris Morris [mailto:chrismo@...]
                        >
                        > > In the thread "Losing Story Cards", somebody mentioned the possibility
                        > of
                        > keeping the stories in a wiki. That sounds interesting. Does anybody have
                        > any experience with this?
                        >
                        > I use it on my one-developer, weird customer, XP-ish situation. I use a
                        > custom Wiki written in Ruby (clWiki @ http://clabs.org/scrpware.htm if you
                        > care...). Lately I've fallen into this pattern:
                        >

                        <pattern snipped)>

                        I have that pattern with a small variation. We have an iterations page
                        where the ordered stories across different projects are grouped together per
                        iteration.

                        We always start with cards for the planning game, but then migrate to the
                        wiki to 'document' the details as and when they get discussed.

                        Karl


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                      • Chris Morris
                        ... per ... Ah, that s a piece I don t do because my iterations are so full of unexpected support calls and whatnot, it s just too much to keep up (although I
                        Message 11 of 11 , Apr 3 7:24 AM
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                          > I have that pattern with a small variation. We have an iterations page
                          > where the ordered stories across different projects are grouped together
                          per
                          > iteration.

                          Ah, that's a piece I don't do because my iterations are so full of
                          unexpected support calls and whatnot, it's just too much to keep up
                          (although I suppose I could still do iterations for the known stuff and all,
                          velocity, etc.)

                          Chris
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