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RE: [XP] The XP Way of Making Games

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  • JUDD John
    Another very interesting approach is taken by the developers of A Tale In The Desert (www.atitd.com). ATITD is a MMORPG that has no violent content, that is no
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 24, 2003
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      Another very interesting approach is taken by the developers of A Tale In The Desert (www.atitd.com). ATITD is a MMORPG that has no violent content, that is no combat. Set in ancient Egypt the players attempt to create a society by building structures, trading with each other, performing tests in the seven disciplines, and by generally working together.

      The approach the designers have taken to the game is that the players themselves can propose laws, publicise them, and have other players vote on them. If a law passes, the developers will implement that law. The only limit is that the laws must not violate the laws of nature, and shouldn't require huge changes to the game.

      Apart from these restrictions, the players can have a real say in the ongoing development of the game. I thought it was an interesting, almost XP approach, to the development of a game by directly involving the stakeholders.


      Cheers

      John

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Ryan Ripley [mailto:ripley@...]
      > Sent: Tuesday, 25 February 2003 14:17
      > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [XP] The XP Way of Making Games
      >
      >
      > LucasArts has taken an interesting approach by setting up an online
      > community for the game StarWas galaxies.
      > http://starwarsgalaxies.station.sony.com/digest/community.jsp
      > They've made
      > available forums, developer notes, etc. Throughout the
      > development of the
      > game, various game issues have been discussed by the
      > developers on the forum
      > with feedback provided by the community members. So, in a
      > very small way,
      > the people waiting for the game did *help* make decision and drive
      > development.
      >
      > Now I have no idea of what language, or development practices
      > they use. I'd
      > assume (c/c++). Althought with the development of sdl4java
      > (http://sourceforge.net/projects/sdl4java/). Perhaps java is
      > being used...
      >
      > Anyways, the galaxies site seemed like an interesting concept
      > for game...
      >
      > take care,
      >
      > --Ryan
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "Nigel Thorne" <nthorne@...>
      > To: <extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Monday, February 24, 2003 8:16 PM
      > Subject: RE: [XP] The XP Way of Making Games
      >
      >
      > > Sorry about the delay in replying.
      > >
      > > Games like web pages and all shrink wrapped products, aim
      > to have a large
      > number of customers. You want to make as many happy as
      > possible. The problem
      > is that any decision you make will make some people happy and
      > not others.
      > Getting concrete feedback from those people is a great idea.
      > But.. you need
      > to have a filter that takes into account all the feedback,
      > but then decides
      > one way or the other. ( the one voice in XP )
      > >
      > > We use a game designer. You would probably just do that
      > yourselves :)
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > > -----Original Message-----
      > > > From: Brent <me@...> [mailto:me@...]
      > > > Sent: Tuesday, 25 February 2003 3:21 AM
      > > > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Subject: [XP] The XP Way of Making Games
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > One of my hobbies is developing web-based games. I'm currently
      > > > working on a "SimProjectManager" game, in which the
      > player assembles
      > > > a development team, bids on contracts, and attempts to complete
      > > > them. I've no idea yet if I'll be able to simulate things like XP
      > > > versus up-front design. :-)
      > > >
      > > > In any event, I've been trying to implement Extreme Programming in
      > > > developing this game. Myself and a friend are Pair Programming
      > > > (digitally, but it works reasonably well), we're trying to write
      > > > Programmer Tests and perform Test-Driven Design, etc.
      > > >
      > > > However, my main concern at the moment is with the Customer Role.
      > > > What is the best implementation of the Customer Role in a game
      > > > context?
      > > >
      > > > Simply choosing one game player to fill the Customer Role
      > strikes me
      > > > as arbitrary and prone to an unhealthy focus on that particular
      > > > player's desires.
      > > >
      > > > When Valve developed Half-Life, they implemented a system wherein
      > > > they would periodically bring in a group of people and
      > let them play-
      > > > test the game. The staff could not interact with the
      > player during
      > > > the game session at all; they could only observe. This
      > was used to
      > > > catalogue the aspects of the game that the play-testers enjoyed or
      > > > had difficulty with.
      > > >
      > > > However, I think that the Valve solution wouldn't provide focus
      > > > and/or direction. It might reveal what works and what
      > doesn't, but
      > > > doesn't an XP-style Customer provide more direct feedback and
      > > > direction?
      > > >
      > > > I'm JustaStudent here. What are your thoughts?
      > > >
      > > > --
      > > > Brent P. Newhall
      > > > http://brent.other-space.com/
      > > >
      > > >
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