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RE: [XP] Erasers & Sledgehammers (was: RE: [XP] Architecture?)

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  • Dan Palanza
    Hi George, ... Yes, I understand this view clearly. ... Agreed. But do understand that when I do construction using Pattern Oriented Design--our version of
    Message 1 of 74 , Oct 4, 2002
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      Hi George,

      >It's not clear to me that you've heard the point made that writing code is
      >NOT the part of software development that's analogous to building a house.
      >It's *compiling* the code that is the real construction phase.

      Yes, I understand this view clearly.

      >Writing the
      >code is analogous to drawing the plans.

      Agreed. But do understand that when I do construction using Pattern
      Oriented Design--our version of XP--I draw far fewer plans than I did when
      the design was completed up front. In fact I only draw outlines, which I
      need to do to get a building permit. Planning now takes the form of
      sketches, comparisons to photographs of other designs, and, most of all,
      verbal. The verbal is by far the primary contributor to design decisions
      because Pattern Oriented Design, in building construction, is a process of
      achieving a consensus between the interests of a customer, a contractor,
      the sub-contractors, and a user community.

      Focusing on how documentation of the design process changes when a team
      moves from up front to iterative design is the connection between our
      disciplines that I'm hoping to connect. I believe that by moving to
      iterative design, Pattern Oriented Construction and XP follow one same
      pattern. If and when that possibility is more widely accepted, I believe,
      the two disciplines will learn a great deal from one another, particularly
      in the paradigm of contract administration and business modeling.

      >I apologize for beating the dead horse if you already understand this.

      I do understand. But I also believe that even so, repeating these points of
      understanding is not beating a dead horse. Establishing patterns that cross
      disciplines suffers extreme difficulties in the beginning. That it might
      take ten years, or more, of effort to change ingrained stereotype images of
      my discipline is quite swift in the greater scheme of cultural advancement :)

      Dan




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dan Palanza
      Hi George, ... Yes, I understand this view clearly. ... Agreed. But do understand that when I do construction using Pattern Oriented Design--our version of
      Message 74 of 74 , Oct 4, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi George,

        >It's not clear to me that you've heard the point made that writing code is
        >NOT the part of software development that's analogous to building a house.
        >It's *compiling* the code that is the real construction phase.

        Yes, I understand this view clearly.

        >Writing the
        >code is analogous to drawing the plans.

        Agreed. But do understand that when I do construction using Pattern
        Oriented Design--our version of XP--I draw far fewer plans than I did when
        the design was completed up front. In fact I only draw outlines, which I
        need to do to get a building permit. Planning now takes the form of
        sketches, comparisons to photographs of other designs, and, most of all,
        verbal. The verbal is by far the primary contributor to design decisions
        because Pattern Oriented Design, in building construction, is a process of
        achieving a consensus between the interests of a customer, a contractor,
        the sub-contractors, and a user community.

        Focusing on how documentation of the design process changes when a team
        moves from up front to iterative design is the connection between our
        disciplines that I'm hoping to connect. I believe that by moving to
        iterative design, Pattern Oriented Construction and XP follow one same
        pattern. If and when that possibility is more widely accepted, I believe,
        the two disciplines will learn a great deal from one another, particularly
        in the paradigm of contract administration and business modeling.

        >I apologize for beating the dead horse if you already understand this.

        I do understand. But I also believe that even so, repeating these points of
        understanding is not beating a dead horse. Establishing patterns that cross
        disciplines suffers extreme difficulties in the beginning. That it might
        take ten years, or more, of effort to change ingrained stereotype images of
        my discipline is quite swift in the greater scheme of cultural advancement :)

        Dan




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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