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RE: [XP] Lisp's attractions (was: Polymorphism)

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  • Charlie Poole
    Mike, I ve snipped the post which was probably more than most folks wanted to know about Lisp, but I enjoyed it. One thing that made Lisp so attractive in
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 31, 2002
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      Mike,

      I've snipped the post which was probably more than most folks
      wanted to know about Lisp, but I enjoyed it.

      One thing that made Lisp so attractive in earlier days was
      that virtually anyone could easily create their own interpreter
      on the most minimal hardware. My 16K S-100 system couldn't
      even run the MS assembler, but I eventually got a minimal
      Lisp into it.

      Charlie Poole
      cpoole@...
      www.pooleconsulting.com
      www.charliepoole.org
    • Ron Jeffries
      ... If we didn t know the language, x = (-b + sqrt(b**2 - 4*a*c)) / ( 2*a) might seem cryptic, as (certainly) would public String[] Lines { get { return
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 1, 2002
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        Around Wednesday, July 31, 2002, 11:46:07 AM, kevinbsmith wrote:

        > Posting cryptic fragments like this probably doesn't inspire
        > many of us to want to learn more about the language.

        If we didn't know the language,

        x = (-b + sqrt(b**2 - 4*a*c)) / ( 2*a)

        might seem cryptic, as (certainly) would

        public String[] Lines {
        get {
        return (String[]) lines.ToArray(typeof(String));
        }
        set {
        lines = new ArrayList(value);
        }

        or for that matter, "Guten Tag" or "bon giorno".

        I don't think any of them are in fact cryptic. They're all just
        unknown. And I don't know where inspiration comes from ... in the case
        of Lisp, it can be worth finding some though.

        Ron Jeffries
        www.XProgramming.com
        FEAR = Fantasy Experienced As Reality
      • Bill de hÓra
        ... Not cryptic; idiomatic. regards, Bill de hÓra .. Propylon www.propylon.com
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 1, 2002
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          > Around Wednesday, July 31, 2002, 11:46:07 AM, kevinbsmith wrote:
          >
          > > Posting cryptic fragments like this probably doesn't inspire
          > > many of us to want to learn more about the language.

          Not cryptic; idiomatic.

          regards,
          Bill de hÓra
          ..
          Propylon
          www.propylon.com
        • Kari Hoijarvi
          I got interested in Lisp in 1984. Because I had no interpreter available, I decided to make my own. It took three weeks and 1400 lines of Pascal. I was a
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 1, 2002
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            I got interested in Lisp in 1984. Because I had no interpreter
            available, I decided to make my own.

            It took three weeks and 1400 lines of Pascal. I was a beginner then.

            Anyway, I think it was one of my best learning experiences ever.

            Kari

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Charlie Poole [mailto:cpoole@...]
            Sent: Wednesday, July 31, 2002 12:54 PM
            To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [XP] Lisp's attractions (was: Polymorphism)


            Mike,

            I've snipped the post which was probably more than most folks
            wanted to know about Lisp, but I enjoyed it.

            One thing that made Lisp so attractive in earlier days was
            that virtually anyone could easily create their own interpreter
            on the most minimal hardware. My 16K S-100 system couldn't
            even run the MS assembler, but I eventually got a minimal
            Lisp into it.

            Charlie Poole
            cpoole@...
            www.pooleconsulting.com
            www.charliepoole.org
          • John Carter
            ... And Ah! there you have it, lisp s attraction. It would have taken you 2000 lines or more to write a Pascal interpreter in any language of your choice. But
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 1, 2002
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              On Thu, 1 Aug 2002, Kari Hoijarvi wrote:

              > I got interested in Lisp in 1984. Because I had no interpreter
              > available, I decided to make my own.
              >
              > It took three weeks and 1400 lines of Pascal. I was a beginner then.
              >
              > Anyway, I think it was one of my best learning experiences ever.

              And Ah! there you have it, lisp's attraction. It would have taken you 2000
              lines or more to write a Pascal interpreter in any language of your
              choice.

              But it takes you a screen full of lisp to write a lisp interpreter in
              lisp.

              Now if you really want elegance and beauty, try joy.


              joy0 ==
              [ [ [ joy0 body joy0 ]
              [ [] ]
              [ pop pop pop ]
              [ cons pop cons ]
              [ opcase pop opcase ]
              [ body pop body ]
              [ i pop joy0 ]
              [ step pop [joy0] cons step ]
              [ [] cons i ] ]
              opcase
              i ]
              step

              is a minimal Joy interpreter written in Joy. See

              http://www.latrobe.edu.au/philosophy/phimvt/joy/jp-joyjoy.html

              for an explanation...
              --


              John Carter Phone : (64)(3) 358 6639
              Tait Electronics Fax : (64)(3) 359 4632
              PO Box 1645 Christchurch Email : john.carter@...
              New Zealand

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            • Ron Jeffries
              ... Reminds me of Forth ... Ron Jeffries www.XProgramming.com You do ill if you praise, but worse if you censure, what you do not understand. --Leonardo da
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 1, 2002
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                Around Friday, August 2, 2002, 2:41:51 AM, John Carter wrote:

                > Now if you really want elegance and beauty, try joy.

                Reminds me of Forth ...

                Ron Jeffries
                www.XProgramming.com
                You do ill if you praise, but worse if you censure,
                what you do not understand. --Leonardo da Vinci
              • Mike Beedle
                ... ... it is its functional cousin: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/philosophy/phimvt/joy/forth-joy.html - Mike
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 1, 2002
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                  Ron wrote:
                  > John wrote:
                  > > Now if you really want elegance and beauty, try joy.
                  >
                  > Reminds me of Forth ...

                  ... it is its functional cousin:
                  http://www.latrobe.edu.au/philosophy/phimvt/joy/forth-joy.html

                  - Mike
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