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Distributed XP

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  • Vidar Langberget
    Hi! I ve just started the planning of a web application for project management and software development planning, using one of the Agile methodologies. This is
    Message 1 of 82 , May 5, 2002
      Hi!

      I've just started the planning of a web application for project
      management and software development planning, using one of the Agile
      methodologies. This is a part of my Msc dissertation.

      >From what I've read about XP, I like it a lot, but it doesn't seem like
      it is suited for distributed development. I've toyed with the idea to
      include some voice over IP or something similar to boost communication.
      I've also thought about using an instant messager client integrated into
      the application. Any other suggestions?

      Another problem is the client. The client will not be as available as
      easily, which is oneof the most important parts of XP. Any suggestions
      on how to solve this problem?

      Another thing.. What happens when there's no direct customer? For
      example a company developing software to sell to many customers, like
      Adobe or somehting similar.. Who writes the user stories then? Or isn't
      XP suitable for such projects?

      Any help appreciated!

      regards,

      Vidar
    • Jason Nocks
      ... ... ... The book, Slack: Getting Past Burnout, Busywork, and the Myth of Total Efficiency strikes me as oddly relevant, particularly the
      Message 82 of 82 , Apr 7, 2006
        On Tuesday 04 April 2006 6:05 am, Keith Braithwaite wrote:
        > --- In extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "Keith Ray" <keith.ray@...>
        >
        > wrote:
        <snip>

        > Lets be careful with these numbers. I find the paper a bit incoherent,
        > seems to jump around a lot between the general, the specfic, personal
        > anecdote and focused experience reoprt, but section 6 seems to be the
        > meat.
        >
        > It states that an (unspecified, no citation) colocated SCRUM team did
        > 959 Function Points in 54 person months, or 17.8 FP/person-month.
        > Whereas the distributed team described in the paper did (via a
        > slightly fishy reverse lookup) 12673 FPs in 827 person months, or 15.3
        > FP/person-month. A 16% difference. How bad is that? Depends on your
        > prefered figure of merit.
        >
        > Interestingly, the paper compares these figures against an industry
        > average FP/person-month for projects _of that size_, whereby the
        > colocated SCRUM team is 42% more productive that the industry average
        > for projects of 1000FPs or so. But the distributed team is around 400%
        > more productive than the industry average for projects in the 10,000's
        > of FPs.
        >
        > Assuming that the colocated team could maintain their 17.8 FP/pm for
        > the whole duration, and all other things being equal, the 4.5 person
        > [sic] co-lo team would have taken slightly less than 160 months to
        > complete the 12000+ FPs. The distributed team took 14.5 months.
        >
        <snip>

        >
        > Something to think about.

        The book, "Slack: Getting Past Burnout, Busywork, and the Myth of Total
        Efficiency" strikes me as oddly relevant, particularly the "Myth of Total
        Efficiency" part. Just my $.02.

        > Keith

        Cheers,
        Jason Nocks
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