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"Proof of Concept" [was: Re: Deferring decisions]

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  • dhemeryy
    Hi Carl, ... See definitions 4 and 3a at . Dale
    Message 1 of 5 , May 1, 2002
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      Hi Carl,

      > My own preference, and I'm sorry I can't remember whether I saw this
      > somewhere or came up with it myself, is to call this a _Test_ of
      > Concept. "Proof" to me strongly suggests that you already know the
      > outcome - far better to undertake such things open-minded, seems to
      > me.

      See definitions 4 and 3a at <http://www.dictionary.com/search?q=proof>.

      Dale
    • yet another bill smith
      ... I liked defn 6, which was seriously off-topic. Other examples in common English usage-- the proof of the pudding is in the eating. smelling gives you some
      Message 2 of 5 , May 1, 2002
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        dhemeryy wrote:
        >
        > Hi Carl,
        >
        > > My own preference, and I'm sorry I can't remember whether I saw this
        > > somewhere or came up with it myself, is to call this a _Test_ of
        > > Concept. "Proof" to me strongly suggests that you already know the
        > > outcome - far better to undertake such things open-minded, seems to
        > > me.
        >
        > See definitions 4 and 3a at <http://www.dictionary.com/search?q=proof>.
        >
        I liked defn 6, which was seriously off-topic. Other examples in common
        English usage--

        the proof of the pudding is in the eating. smelling gives you some idea,
        but if you really want to know how good it is, there's only one sure way
        of getting the authoritative knowledge.

        the exception proves the rule. you want to know how/when to apply the
        rule, look for cases where it does NOT apply. This usage also carries
        some suggestion that the rule might fail the test--if there are too many
        exceptions, the rule is useless.

        in making yeast-based bread, one starts by verifying that the yeast is
        still alive. Put the yeast into some sugar water, if it bubbles it's OK.
        this is known as 'proofing' the yeast.

        Returnig to topic, I've always heard this called a "Proof of COncept"
        at least until I read XP, where it is likely to be called a spike.
      • Jim Standley
        While proof of concept is fairly widely used, we did have a lot of discussion about exactly what we expected at the end. This was finally defined on a per
        Message 3 of 5 , May 3, 2002
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          While "proof of concept" is fairly widely used, we did have a lot of
          discussion about exactly what we expected at the end. This was finally
          defined on a per case basis, mostly dependent on where the feature fit in
          the schedule and who might be doing the remaining work. Some times the
          result of the POC was code ready to be integrated. I thought that was going
          too far, and it was the exception. Most of the time it was a demonstration
          that something was possible, expecting the real code to cut & paste some of
          the nitty gritty bits, but to refactor most of the code into the baseline.
          When a handoff to a less experienced developer was expected (no PP here) the
          result included some hints or design on how to integrate.

          Proof, demonstration, test, I'm not real concerned about the word. I'd
          think "concept" is more up for debate, as this was often a trial of one or
          more proposed designs than a concept. We also gave permission to change the
          design as needed to make it work, so it might wind up a demonstration of
          some quite different concept. Some very good counter-proposals came after
          proving the original concept would NOT work.

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "yet another bill smith" <bigbill.smith@...>
          To: <extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2002 3:58 PM
          Subject: Re: [XP] "Proof of Concept" [was: Re: Deferring decisions]


          > dhemeryy wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi Carl,
          > >
          > > > My own preference, and I'm sorry I can't remember whether I saw this
          > > > somewhere or came up with it myself, is to call this a _Test_ of
          > > > Concept. "Proof" to me strongly suggests that you already know the
          > > > outcome - far better to undertake such things open-minded, seems to
          > > > me.
          > >
          > > See definitions 4 and 3a at <http://www.dictionary.com/search?q=proof>.
          > >
          > I liked defn 6, which was seriously off-topic. Other examples in common
          > English usage--
          >
          > the proof of the pudding is in the eating. smelling gives you some idea,
          > but if you really want to know how good it is, there's only one sure way
          > of getting the authoritative knowledge.
          >
          > the exception proves the rule. you want to know how/when to apply the
          > rule, look for cases where it does NOT apply. This usage also carries
          > some suggestion that the rule might fail the test--if there are too many
          > exceptions, the rule is useless.
          >
          > in making yeast-based bread, one starts by verifying that the yeast is
          > still alive. Put the yeast into some sugar water, if it bubbles it's OK.
          > this is known as 'proofing' the yeast.
          >
          > Returnig to topic, I've always heard this called a "Proof of COncept"
          > at least until I read XP, where it is likely to be called a spike.
          >
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