Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [XP] non-programmer developers or customers?

Expand Messages
  • John D. Mitchell
    ... [...] ... Where do you draw the line at defining the roles? I.e., how deep are going? Take care, John
    Message 1 of 3 , May 2 2:21 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      >>>>> "Michael" == Michael Schneider <michael.schneider@...> writes:
      [...]
      > We have started to use stakeholder cards in our XP projects. We create
      > one card for every role in the system.

      Where do you draw the line at defining the roles? I.e., how deep are
      going?

      Take care,
      John
    • Michael Schneider
      ... Since this is new for us, just several projects, I can share what we have learned to date... Will keep you posted as we learn more... Whenever you create
      Message 2 of 3 , May 2 8:29 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        "John D. Mitchell" wrote:

        > >>>>> "Michael" == Michael Schneider <michael.schneider@...> writes:
        > [...]
        > > We have started to use stakeholder cards in our XP projects. We create
        > > one card for every role in the system.
        >
        > Where do you draw the line at defining the roles? I.e., how deep are
        > going?
        >
        > Take care,
        > John
        >

        Since this is new for us, just several projects, I can share what we have
        learned to date... Will keep you posted as we learn more...


        Whenever you create a new story that is not supported by a current role,
        create a new role card.

        Whenever you identify a new role in the system that has no stories, you
        create stories for that role.

        You refactor/rewrite roles as you go. This seems to be working well for
        us in our systems that cross multiple domains.


        As you interview people involved in the current process that you are modeling,
        it is interesting to watch them as they discover all of the roles that they
        play as they execute a process. A set of well defined roles in a
        complex process can help you decide the skills necessary for your staff.

        This can be invaluable for training, and can give your people a growth
        path to different parts of the organization. For ex. to execute story
        ABC, you need role Q to perform Y, Role R to perform Z ,..
        You very quickly see the value of your key people that can
        perform multiple roles.


        Hope this helps, will keep you posted,
        Mike

        >
        > To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...
        >
        > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
        >
        > Ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.com
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.