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Re: [XP] Re: If coach is a programmer, where do I fit in?

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  • Malte Kroeger
    ... The coach is responsible for the process and nothing else. But beeing coach is a role. And any person can have several roles. So it s possible to be coach
    Message 1 of 2 , May 1 11:02 AM
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      > I am a programmer and they want me to be the Coach on a project. My
      > concern was that I wouldn't be able to do any coding. In reading Kent
      > Beck's book regarding the Coach role there is no mention of coding.
      > The Coach is more responsible for the process.

      The coach is responsible for the process and nothing else.
      But beeing coach is a role. And any person can have several roles. So it's
      possible to be coach and programmer in the same project. Being coach will
      increase your loadfactor quite a bit of course.
      If you have a well trained team, being coach is not so much work. If you
      start a new team, being the coach is probably a full time job.

      I would suggest you see how much of your time is taken when being coach.
      The rest you can be a programmer.

      The other side of the story was: Does the coach have to know programming?

      I think it would be very helpfull if the coach knows about software
      development. This doesn't necessarily mean that he has to be a programmer
      but would make things easier.
      In the end it all depends on the person being coach. If you have a person
      that knows XP very well and can coach a team in sticking to the rules
      without being a programmer, that's fine. I just think it's easier to
      comprehend the rules, if you have yourself experience in the field.

      Malte
    • Randy Coulman
      ... I think there is a subtle play between two roles here: 1. Someone has to decide that XP (or any other process change) is the way to go. 2. Someone has to
      Message 2 of 2 , May 1 1:52 PM
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        > >
        > > Since you yourself mention that XP is a grass roots process why
        > > shouldn't you be able to be a Coach?
        >
        > I guess I was thinking that if it comes from the process person, it's
        > not grass roots any more.
        >

        I think there is a subtle play between two roles here:

        1. Someone has to decide that XP (or any other process change) is the
        way to go.
        2. Someone has to help the team achieve the process change.

        I see the Coach as filling role 2. If your situation is such that you
        would (also) be filling role 1, then you don't have the grass roots
        support that you may need. If, however, the team itself is filling role
        1, then you should be fine.

        Your role as a Coach is then to remind the team of what they wanted when
        the going gets tough, to help them fully implement (or customize) the
        process based on actual results, and hopefully to achieve the results
        they were looking for when they adopted the process in the first place.

        Randy
        --
        Randy Coulman, M.Sc. Settler Agricultural Software
        RandyC@... 200 - 1911 Park St. Regina, SK S4N 2G5
        Senior Developer Phone: (306) 721-7949 Ext. 224
        Special Projects Fax: (306) 721-1981 http://www.settler.com
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