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Re: [XP] Unit Test Challenge II

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  • Ron Jeffries
    ... Compare in your mind the relative clarity of relational database over hierarchic or network, maybe XML as an example. This clarity comes in large part
    Message 1 of 263 , Apr 1, 2002
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      Around Monday, April 1, 2002, 12:27:31 PM, Bill de hÓra wrote:

      >> 2. Build a useful database tool on Extended Set Theory. (I can
      >> see how this would have little appeal outside a very small
      >> circle. Trust me when I say that set theory is a way cool way
      >> to build a database system if you can figure it out.)

      > Tell us more. What would be cool about it?

      Compare in your mind the relative clarity of relational database over
      hierarchic or network, maybe XML as an example. This clarity comes in
      large part because the operations of relational are mathematical in
      nature ... essentially relations are closed under all the operations
      of relational algebra, so everything just hooks together nicely.

      Extended Set Theory does that to a wider range of structures than
      relational. In essence, XST can represent and manipulate /any/ data
      structure in a clean, closed, mathematical way -- not just flat
      relational sets.

      I'm not saying that should light anyone else's fire. It rather lights
      mine, is all.

      Does that help explain what would be cool about it?

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
      XP says: Don't just sit on your DUF, do something. Get some feedback.
    • Ilja Preuß
      ... I don t write many asserts or comments, but *I* would most often prefer asserts before comments because - I always first look at the code if I want to know
      Message 263 of 263 , Apr 6, 2002
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        > Why don't you replace the asserts with comments?

        I don't write many asserts or comments, but *I* would most often prefer
        asserts before comments because

        - I always first look at the code if I want to know what it does. If a
        precondition is significant enough to be written down, it is probably
        significant enough to be spotted early.

        - I most often find it easier to articulate something about code *in*
        code than in natural language.

        - I think if I *don't* find it easy to articulate a significant concept
        about the code in code, that tells me something about the design.

        - Even if I find it easy to articulate an assertion, writing it down
        might nevertheless tell me something about the design I didn't smell
        before.

        - I almost always find it easier to understand code than to understand
        natural language.

        - I am more likely to forget adjusting a comment to changing code than
        adjusting an assert.

        - I think it is easier to refactor an assertion than to refactor a
        comment

        - I simply hate writing comments, whereas I love writing code! ;-)

        There are probably more reasons...

        Regards, Ilja
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