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RE: [XP] language question (human language)

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  • Bill de hÓra
    ... Hash: SHA1 ... You (the manager) watch the best people leave, ie the 20% that code 80% of your software. If this is the way their managed, the organisation
    Message 1 of 135 , Apr 1, 2002
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      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Laurent Bossavit [mailto:laurent@...]
      > Sent: 29 March 2002 16:26
      > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [XP] language question (human language)
      >
      >
      > > There's an underlying assumption in these statements that
      > unit testing
      > > will prevent you from shipping in six weeks. The statements
      > > sound mutually exclusive. Why? I'm not sure. Is there
      > something else the
      > > manager wants you spending time on, other than just making the
      > > deadline?
      >
      > Heh. The cruel thing is that quite possibly, making the deadline
      > is impossible anyway. If we haven't been unit testing, it's
      > likely that we haven't been measuring velocity either.
      >
      > So privately I (the manager) know that the six-week deadline is a
      > sham anyway. I'd want you to spend time "fighting fires" and
      > pulling overtime to make me look good. Unit testing without
      > overtime
      > doesn't sound good to me - I'm the one who's going to take the
      > blame then, and with my ulcer firing up again that's not such a
      > hot idea. I sure as hell don't know how to deal with the
      > situation.
      >
      > Now what ?

      You (the manager) watch the best people leave, ie the 20% that code
      80% of your software. If this is the way their managed, the
      organisation might not know it had best people in the first place.
      If the organisation doesn't have the collective guts needed to
      admit a deadline is a sham, chances for systematic failure are good
      (where systematic means all the blame cannot be allocated to
      underlings). I suspect binding churn rates to management rather
      than the organisation as a whole would be insightful.

      There's a gorilla/chimp theory that suggests as burgeoning
      technology markets eventually get served, you should do this
      quickly or someone else will (it's in "Inside the Tornado" I think,
      could be wrong). Accordingly, shipping junk under unfeasible
      deadlines only works if the market demand is such that it will take
      any junk it's offered. I'm not sure how something like XP squares
      with such markets, maybe very well.

      As for ulcerated management. I worked with a guy from Rhode Island
      a while back, who'd been consulting for many years. He had roughly
      this to say: the first thing I do on a project is find the person
      who's going to get fired if it doesn't work out; that's where the
      trouble comes from.

      Bill de hÓra

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    • yet another bill smith
      Bill de hÓra wrote: From: Mike Clark [mailto:mike@clarkware.com] ... Ah, such a fate! Easter is the time to remember past sacrifices, isn t it. McInis go
      Message 135 of 135 , Apr 3, 2002
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        Bill de hÓra wrote:
        From: Mike Clark [mailto:mike@...]
        Bill de hÓra wrote:

        > > > o you're weak, because you can't code without tests.
        > > > o you're writing code that isn't deliverable.
        > > >
        > > > whereby one can get cornered into admitting one's not
        > > > competent.
        > > >
        > >
        > > I suppose the same person might accuse you of being weak
        > > because you can't code without a design document or a version
        > > control system, both of which are not deliverable.
        >
        > Oh. That's _very_ good. I shall sacrifice a Guinness in your honour
        > tonight.
        >
        Ah, such a fate! Easter is the time to remember past sacrifices, isn't
        it.

        McInis go bragh.
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