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Re: On wanting success (was Re: [XP] cons of XP -- on "success")

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  • Laurent Bossavit
    ... I d like to pursue the smoker analogy... There are many ways you can quit smoking, from keeping a list on paper of every time of day you ve wanted a cig
    Message 1 of 98 , Mar 1, 2002
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      > So, agile processes are quicker, cheaper, and more responsive, but
      > require more disciplined people.

      I'd like to pursue the smoker analogy... There are many ways you
      can quit smoking, from keeping a list on paper of every time of day
      you've wanted a cig since going cold turkey, to nicotine patches or
      chewing gum or whatever, to just no longer wanting to smoke one
      bright and beautiful day.

      These processes require varying degrees of formality in your
      commitment to them. Do they require more or less discipline
      according to their degree of formality ? Or is that not the case and
      what matters is that you "really want" to quit, not just say you want to
      quit ?

      I believe it's a matter of strength of commitment, and that there are
      various ways in which one can be strongly committed to something.

      So I also suspect that there is no useful distinction to be drawn
      between "really wanting" something and "having the discipline" to
      pursue it - but I'm open to learning more about what distinctions of
      that sort might be drawn...

      But I'll note that for "the same" strength of commitment, some
      processes might conceivably yield more concrete results than some
      others. It's even possible that such a relation holds between XP and,
      say, classic Waterfall.
    • Dossy
      ... Yes. I feel the way you rephrased what I said is a good way of distilling what I was trying to say from what I actually said. I d even go so far as to say
      Message 98 of 98 , Mar 2, 2002
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        Dossy said:
        > > All the XP practices are the simplest (leanest?) way of achieving
        > > each necessary piece of the software development process, and
        > > in such a manner, support each other making each practice even
        > > that more useful than the practice by itself. That's why I
        > > say that substituting a different solution instead of doing the
        > > XP practice will be less effective.

        Dale said:
        > Here's my interpretation: XP has only essential practices. Other
        > methodologies include helpful-but-nonessential practices that you
        > might be able to remove safely. But if you remove a practice from XP,
        > you're removing something that is (very likely to be) essential to
        > your success.
        >
        > Am I getting the cause-and-effect right?

        Yes. I feel the way you rephrased what I said is a good way
        of distilling what I was trying to say from what I actually said.

        I'd even go so far as to say that XP's "essential practices" aren't
        even always essential for every single possible project. However,
        you can never be certain which practices aren't possible at the
        start of the project, so you're best bet is to do them all at the
        start. Then, decide how to adapt as experience guides you.

        -- Dossy

        --
        Dossy Shiobara mail: dossy@...
        Panoptic Computer Network web: http://www.panoptic.com/
        "He realized the fastest way to change is to laugh at your own
        folly -- then you can let go and quickly move on." (p. 70)
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