Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [XP] Project managment in XP?

Expand Messages
  • steve@miner.com
    My favorite topic. I would say the first thing to do is throw away the concept of management controls unless you mean controlling managers . As a project
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 6, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      My favorite topic.

      I would say the first thing to do is throw away the concept of "management
      controls" unless you mean "controlling managers".

      As a project leader, I think of myself of the guy who makes sure the
      practices are followed, especially in areas of planning. Other than that,
      you spend about 20% of your time removing obstacles from the teams way, and
      80% explaining what XP is to the rest of the company.

      One last item: Listen very carefully to what people say is in their way at
      the stand up meeting. Sometimes they only see the surface of what is in the
      way, and you have to find what really needs to be moved.

      Steve

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Leif Oscar [mailto:leifoscar@...]
      > Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2002 8:41 AM
      > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [XP] Project managment in XP?
      >
      >
      > Hi!
      >
      > Can anyone tell me about how it is to be a project
      > leader in xp?
      >
      > A classical mistake of system development is
      > "insufficient management controls". Any idea how xp
      > solves this?
      >
      > Leifoscar.
      >
      > ______________________________________________________
      > Sjekk snørapporter...
      > fra 500 ski-destinasjoner i Europa
      > på http://no.snow.yahoo.com/
      >
      > To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...
      >
      > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
      > extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
      >
      > ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.com
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
    • John Hayes
      Insufficient Controls refers to the inability of management to track progress throughout the project s lifetime. The project has gone dark . When this occurs,
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 6, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Insufficient Controls refers to the inability of management to track
        progress throughout the project's lifetime. The project has "gone dark".
        When this occurs, it's not possible to control the project in any
        meaningful way because there's no good information.

        XP introduces several practices to prevent projects from going dark:
        1. Short iterations of a 1-3 weeks five you frequent concrete
        milestones.
        2. Test first improves your confidence in the code you do have - and
        removes the fuzziness of what a developer means when they say "done". If
        there isn't unit test coverage - the code isn't done.
        3. Pair programming and collective code ownership prevents a single
        person from going dark because there is no private work.

        As for management control? XP doesn't prescribe any in particular - but
        it enables them.

        John

        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Leif Oscar [mailto:leifoscar@...]
        > Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2002 10:41 AM
        > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [XP] Project managment in XP?

        > Can anyone tell me about how it is to be a project
        > leader in xp?

        > A classical mistake of system development is
        > "insufficient management controls". Any idea how xp
        > solves this?
      • Gee, Joe
        ... I hate to do it, because I so often agree with you, Laurent, but I have to argue here. The reluctant leader/reluctant follower model is excellent, and
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 6, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          > From: Laurent Bossavit [mailto:laurent@...]
          > > Can anyone tell me about how it is to be a project leader in xp?
          > Intermittent. The whole team leads - and follows.

          I hate to do it, because I so often agree with you, Laurent, but I have to
          argue here. The reluctant leader/reluctant follower model is excellent, and
          something I would encourage in any environment I work in, but it isn't
          enough alone.

          I would say that about 10-25% of professionals are self-motivated. Less
          than half of those are motivated to continously re-evaluate and refine their
          work methods, their team's methods, and their outputs. Additionally, in
          order to be able to perform that learning and those improvements, there
          needs to be a safety zone for the team members to grow in.

          Addressing all those things are what I've found to be necessary for a team
          leader in xp, or in anything. The team leader has the opportunity and the
          authority to create safety and encourage self and team evaluation, as well
          as helping the team stay balanced between not pushing so hard that they
          can't maintain a sustainable pace or leave the slack necessary to grow and
          innovate, and the other end of just slacking off. I am of two minds whether
          it is appropriate to combine that role with the role of the coach.

          Anyway, those have been my observations. I welcome other ones.

          Joe Gee


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Peter Hansen
          ... Perhaps visibility is a better term, since control implies that management will not only keep track of things, but use the data to interfere in the
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 6, 2002
          • 0 Attachment
            John Hayes wrote:
            >
            > Insufficient Controls refers to the inability of management to track
            > progress throughout the project's lifetime. The project has "gone dark".
            > When this occurs, it's not possible to control the project in any
            > meaningful way because there's no good information.

            Perhaps "visibility" is a better term, since control implies that
            management will not only keep track of things, but use the data to
            "interfere" in the project, which might not (or might) be true.

            > XP introduces several practices to prevent projects from going dark:
            > 1. Short iterations of a 1-3 weeks five you frequent concrete
            > milestones.
            > 2. Test first improves your confidence in the code you do have - and
            > removes the fuzziness of what a developer means when they say "done". If
            > there isn't unit test coverage - the code isn't done.
            > 3. Pair programming and collective code ownership prevents a single
            > person from going dark because there is no private work.

            Good points. In addition, XP provides a release plan with specific
            dates and the strong expectation that those dates will not move
            significantly, or even at all. Combined with (1) above, that provides
            a relatively very accurate and reliable picture of the status of
            the project, as opposed to traditional approaches which seem to be
            founded on made-up dates and often an understanding that none of them
            are likely to be met.

            As a middle manager using XP, I would say that in summary XP
            provides exceptional "management control" both for me and my
            own management who are always interested in overall project status,
            ship dates, etc. With much less stress.

            -Peter
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.