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[XP] Re: Mapping Tests to Stories

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  • Ron Jeffries
    ... The Simplest Thing might be to execute them all. Of course, for efficiency reasons, sometimes you don t want to execute them all. In that case, the thing
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 2, 2000
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      At 10:54 PM 4/1/2000 +0100, you wrote:
      >During a recent discussion at the OT conference in England, some of us
      >were wondering about how to associate stories with their corresponding
      >functional tests. The Simplest Thing might be to write the tests on the
      >back of the story cards, but that still doesn't ensure that they get executed.

      The Simplest Thing might be to execute them all. Of course, for efficiency
      reasons, sometimes you don't want to execute them all. In that case, the
      thing to do is to skip the ones that couldn't possibly be affected by the
      changes you have made.

      This leads to the interesting sub-question, Why do you have tests if you
      know what your code does? And the interesting sub-answer, You don't know
      what your code does, it's your imagination.

      Regarding the idea with the holes, I regret to inform you that there's
      prior art both in machine-reading of the holes and this other neat deal
      where the holes are sometimes holes and sometimes edge notches and you take
      something long and thin and stick through the holes and the notched ones
      fall on the floor, usually going down cracks or under the safe.

      However, if you build a really cool Lego Robot with a web interface (and a
      long thin stick), and call the patent Robotic Internet Agent Auto-selecting
      Functional Tests with a Single Click Stick, you've got a shot. Try to get a
      dog in the picture, the patent office loves dogs.

      Ron Jeffries
      www.XProgramming.com
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