Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [XP] OOPSLA 2001 trip report

Expand Messages
  • wecaputo@thoughtworks.com
    ... Thanks Mark for the report Mark. I wanted to comment on the following: It is only by looking at things in the context of failure that successful designs
    Message 1 of 103 , Oct 21, 2001
      Mark Windholtz:
      >I just posted my OOPSLA 2001 trip report.


      Thanks Mark for the report Mark. I wanted to comment on the following:


      "It is only by looking at things in the context of failure that successful
      designs evolve."
      "This of course plays right into the hands of XP advocates who insist that
      no production code should be written without first writing a failing test."

      In addition this is very much in the spirit of why XP advocates insist on
      many things:

      Iterative development in short iterations -- so we can learn from the
      failures, and do so quickly.
      Simple Design (TSTTCPW, YAGNI) -- since we are going to fail, let's only do
      so for what we actually need. Overbuilding (i.e. beyond the immediate
      requirement) gives us too little feedback, and makes it more likely to have
      a big failure later.
      Pair Programming -- two people misapplying a design idea is less likely
      than one.

      Last week I had several posts that seemed to point to the central power of
      XP is in its ability to build real teams. This week I say the reason it
      does such a damn good job is that it forces everyone to recognize that they
      will make mistakes and fail, and to leverage that, instead of trying
      (vainly) to avoid it.

      I remember playing stickball in my friend's backyard as a kid. Second base
      was an old garbage can lid in front of a tree. Once while running to
      second, I tripped over a tree root or something, and stumbled . I can
      remember the fall very clearly, because I was almost able to get my
      balance. As I stumbled ever closer to the tree, I can remember making a
      concious choice to just fall, and stop trying to catch my balance.
      Fortunately I did so in time to get my arm in front of my face as I bashed
      into the tree. If I would have just simply fallen, I wouldn't have been
      close enough to hit the tree at all, and had I waited any longer, I would
      have hit my head instead.

      The lessson I learned was, when you're going to fall anyway its best to do
      it sooner rather than later; the extra momentum you get from trying to stay
      up, makes the final fall much harder than it would have been earlier.

      Best,
      Bill
    • Fehskens, Len
      ... Critical typo -- I have been *unable* to find the paper. I believe it was published in a SIGPLAN conference proceedings, sometime in the 70s. len.
      Message 103 of 103 , Nov 5, 2001
        Dan Palanza replies to me:

        >Overlapping triplets is precisely how the universal pattern
        >takes form is a bookkeeping framework. Once again, Len,
        >I would love to see this paper.

        Critical typo -- I have been *unable* to find the paper. I believe
        it was published in a SIGPLAN conference proceedings, sometime
        in the '70s.

        len.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.