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RE: [XP] Quality

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  • Morris, Chris
    ... It s easier to make predictions when a routine has been established. One can only meet expectations without direct communication when both parties have a
    Message 1 of 54 , Aug 1, 2001
      > Yesterday, our customer indicated a strong negative reaction to this
      > situation. He likened it to a service industry situation, where you
      > have to explicitly ask for (and pay for) every little thing.
      > "Oh, you
      > wanted a bun with your hamburger? That'll be an extra 20
      > cents." But
      > if you've ever had a very high quality service experience,
      > you know it
      > makes a huge difference if everything you need is taken care of
      > before, or just as, you need it. You know the joy and luxury of not
      > having to ask for anything - your server accurately predicts your
      > every need, and handles everything without being asked. At the same
      > time, nothing is superfluous.

      It's easier to make predictions when a routine has been established. One can
      only meet expectations without direct communication when both parties have a
      shared experience.

      A friend of mine went to Cancun recently and ate at a restaurant. They
      expected their waiter to bring their check after the dishes had been
      cleared, but after waiting a while they finally had to ask the waiter to
      bring it. Poor service? No ... they later read that there it's considered
      rude for a waiter to bring the check prior to the customer asking for it.

      Obviously, your customer's experience with documentation is not the same as
      yours/XP. Time to mourn the loss of the luxury of communication-free
      need-meeting and start talkin' (always the rub). [Insert Ron's reply here].

      Your post seems to ask the question: Is XP lacking in excellent customer
      service because there's not much of the "joy and luxury of not having to
      ask?" I'd say it's not, not because of XP itself, but because XP is about
      solving problems by building/inventing new programs. This process, IMO, is
      inherently fraught with the work of communication.

      Chris
    • Matthew Davis
      ... Tolerances on thread size and length, I d guess. -M5w
      Message 54 of 54 , Sep 24, 2001
        --- In extremeprogramming@y..., Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@a...> wrote:
        > > Screw quality.
        >
        > What form of quality were you thinking of?

        Tolerances on thread size and length, I'd guess.

        -M5w
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