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RE: Ego or hive mind? (was RE: [XP] Re: justifying XP design prin cipl es)

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  • Jason Rogers
    To address some of the counter-arguments: 1. I take ego to be inflated sense of self worth or inflated sense of pride. This is not at all a tolerable
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 1, 2001
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      To address some of the counter-arguments:

      1. I take ego to be "inflated sense of self worth or inflated sense of
      pride." This is not at all a tolerable practice.

      2. Pride in one's work - yes, it's good.

      3. Collective ownership of the code - Perhaps Robert Blum is correct in his
      approach. Shared ownership isn't shared if its owned by one (the team), but
      it is shared if it's owned by many in an equal manner (the individuals).
      The key is that everyone be convinced of equal ownership and equal
      responsibility. This is where denial of self becomes important. I can't
      feel more inclined to ownership or responsibility to code that I have
      personally touched and less inclined to that which I haven't personally
      touched, that "infects" the paradigm. Self denial is important because
      without it my ego would tend to make me more inclined to the former because
      I somehow have a better sense of pride about that code. That should be
      discouraged. Also, I wouldn't feel threatened if others on the team threw
      away code that my partner(s) and I wrote because it was junky code. Ego
      (the way I understand it) would not allow for that. Likewise I don't feel
      threatened after spending an entire iteration on a section of code that my
      partner(s) and I worked on and felt was at least decent when it is proven to
      be less than acceptable. Ego (the way I understand it) would not allow for
      that.

      4. "team-vote the uncomfortable solution out" - I never suggested this. I
      believe whole-heartedly that it's good to challenge one another and that XP
      (like any good practice) would encourage this.

      5. "As nice as the concept of a hive mind is, I don't think it will work
      with human beings." - I am not suggesting hive mind either (and I don't
      think it sounds nice at all). We *are* individuals. But, when it comes to
      the good of the team and the individual is in opposition to it, the
      individual must be willing to compromise despite what his/her ego is calling
      him/her to do. This is something I believe XP encourages, directly or
      indirectly.

      6. "people don't just become egoless drones when they do XP." - no they
      don't. It's a process of growing. They may never get to the point where
      they are egoless, very few do - no matter in what field/endeavor they find
      themselves. The process of XP is to minimize it as much as possible.
      Maximize the good, minimize the bad. If egos work for your team - you
      should maximize on that (I frankly don't see how they can work for the good
      of the team).

      -Jason
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