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Ego or hive mind? (was RE: [XP] Re: justifying XP design principl es)

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  • azami@speakeasy.net
    ... maybe ... conflict. ... silently, ... I agree 100%. I don t know how many meetings (e.g., design reviews) I ve been in where all the reviewers just nodded
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2001
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      --- In extremeprogramming@y..., "Blum, Robert" <rblum@m...> wrote:
      > Same here - but I believe ego is a crucial part of the process. But
      maybe
      > it's a personality thing. I know I _need_ a productive sort of
      conflict.
      > There's nothing worse for me than people just accepting my ideas
      silently,
      > nodding (or nodding off?)

      I agree 100%. I don't know how many meetings (e.g., design reviews)
      I've been in where all the reviewers just nodded or said, "Uh-huh,
      looks okay to me." If it's my work being reviewed, that gives me no
      extra confidence. Withstanding strong opposition - or getting
      strong allegiance - gives me confidence.

      As a result, I'm always very vocal when reviewing others' work. I get
      plenty of ribbing for it, too - I'm the one who makes the meetings
      really long! :-) But I do think it's important to seriously hunt for
      holes!

      -Matthew
      azami@...
    • dmitry@yahoo.com
      ... become ... I think the problem here is that the word ego means different things to different people. There are at least two mutually opposed definitions
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 1, 2001
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        > > There is no "My", "Mine" or "I" in team. There is no room
        > > for egos in XP.
        >
        > That's a pretty harsh judgment. In my experience, people don't just
        become
        > egoless drones when they do XP.

        I think the problem here is that the word "ego" means different
        things to different people. There are at least two mutually opposed
        definitions for it: "an exaggerated sense of self-importance;
        conceit" and "appropriate pride in oneself; self-esteem".
        (http://www.dictionary.com/cgi-bin/dict.pl?term=ego).

        If you use the first definition, "ego" is definitely something XP
        doesn't tolerate. If you use the second one, it would seem to be
        something that XP practices would encourage and foster in team
        members.

        Dmitry
      • bchambless@nrlssc.navy.mil
        ... Absolutely! I ve known programmers whose biggest flaw was the lack of the second for of ego . Put them in a team with people who have too much of the
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 4, 2001
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          --- In extremeprogramming@y..., dmitry@y... wrote:


          > I think the problem here is that the word "ego" means different
          > things to different people. There are at least two mutually opposed
          > definitions for it: "an exaggerated sense of self-importance;
          > conceit" and "appropriate pride in oneself; self-esteem".
          > (http://www.dictionary.com/cgi-bin/dict.pl?term=ego).

          > If you use the first definition, "ego" is definitely something XP
          > doesn't tolerate. If you use the second one, it would seem to be
          > something that XP practices would encourage and foster in team
          > members.

          Absolutely!

          I've known programmers whose biggest flaw was the lack of the
          second for of "ego". Put them in a team with people who have
          too much of the first form, and things get really interesting.
          it almost requires a coach/moderator/leader to draw out the
          more timid team members (and to chill out the otheres!).
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