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Re: [XP] Metaphor depracated?

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  • Andrew Hunt
    ... That s a good and useful tool, but it s not the same as a Methapor, nor is it as powerful. The metaphor can be almost fractal, as it can answer low-level
    Message 1 of 189 , May 1, 2001
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      Kenneth tells us:

      >>Perhaps "metaphor" is even too extreme for most people. Perhaps
      >>"abstract" is a better word (or, maybe not a better word, but a
      >>better idea). "High-level overview" is probably the term most
      >>techies can appreciate. ..
      >
      >On some projects I have replaced "metaphor" with "one page drawing". That
      >is, you make a one page drawing of the whole system (which forces it to be a
      >"high-level overview"). This drawing gets shared around to the different
      >folks concerned.
      >

      That's a good and useful tool, but it's not the same as a Methapor,
      nor is it as powerful. The metaphor can be almost fractal, as it
      can answer low-level questions as well as high-level questions.
      A small set of rules -- a common, agreed upon metaphor -- can be
      like magic.

      Some pesky question comes up that no one had thought of before.
      You look at it through the metaphor, and the generative properties
      of the metaphor suggest a solution that fits in with the rest of
      the world: "oh, that's really just like this over here, we can
      handle it the same way."

      It's one of the most reliable ways I personally know of to create an elegant
      system with high conceptual integrity. It's also not always possible,
      and rarely obvious (at least to me).

      /\ndy
    • wecaputo@thoughtworks.com
      ... harm. Maybe as a corollary to Alistair s quote about analogies we can say, All metaphors are neither true nor false, some are useful. ;-)
      Message 189 of 189 , May 7, 2001
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        Ron Jeffries:
        >Metaphors are not something to understand (Lakoff et al notwithstanding).
        >Metaphors are something to experience. Let it happen; it won't do any
        harm.

        Maybe as a corollary to Alistair's quote about analogies we can say, "All
        metaphors are neither true nor false, some are useful." ;-)
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