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Re: [XP] Pair programming vs. Mentoring in a pair

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  • Kenneth Tyler
    ..I know of some teams who choose to accept productivity well ... Ron, I think really putting in those terms is a short cut for referring to a deeper problem,
    Message 1 of 79 , Apr 1, 2001
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      ..I know of some teams who choose to accept productivity well
      >below what they are capable of, because (I believe) they'd have to look in
      >the mirror too much. Maybe there's nothing wrong with wanting a job where
      >they'll pay us for doing something we already know how to do. I know the
      >feeling myself sometimes ...
      Ron,
      I think really putting in those terms is a short cut for referring to a
      deeper problem, that we are working in areas of such complexity that you can
      no longer see directly into the work and therefore can find no resting place
      in it...like a samurai you must work constantly at remaining "flexible",
      open to the possibility of sudden death...at one time pilots on the
      mississippi were highly paid, greatly skilled, and in short supply, they had
      to memorize great stretches of river, which changed constantly...i suspect
      that going down the mississippi you could never "relax"....if we programmed
      in areas that, other than our programming, remained more or less stable,
      then some stability would be more possible....moltke (? german general) once
      said..i don't want a man who knows what is correct in a given situation...i
      want a man who can see what is necessary to do to win...there is a great
      samurai movie where one guy says to the other...trying to learn to sword
      fight outside of war is like trying to learn to swim on dry land....i
      suspect that some businesses can pretend that their situation is not
      changing and that they can afford to have people working who are not "alive"
      to the real possibilities of the moment...but i am afraid that working in
      such situations i would lose my real ability, which is to see change coming
      and roll with the punches...and i can't afford to let "unlearn" it. sorry
      to ramble.....my dad once stopped in the middle of the day, looked around
      and said...you know, i learn more now in a day sometimes than i used to
      learn in a whole year...(he was 65)...
      Kenneth Tyler
    • billy@psisys01.nrlssc.navy.mil
      ... Absolutely. If all a person got out of studying XP was unit testing, automated testing, and (especially) test-first programming, their productivity would
      Message 79 of 79 , Apr 9, 2001
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        davechaplin@... wrote:

        > Responding to Ron Jeffries:
        > > Not in public. Anyone who has been around has seen teams differ by
        > > at least 10X, and probably has ideas as to why. I make no
        > > productivity claims for XP at all, at least not in terms of
        > > numbers. There's no way to know, AFAICS.

        > My personal experience is that by doing upfront testing and using
        > automated test harnesses you get a massive increase in productivity.
        > People spend more time building the new stuff, and less time fixing
        > what they have already apparently finished writing.

        Absolutely.

        If all a person got out of studying XP was unit testing, automated testing,
        and (especially) test-first programming, their productivity would almost
        have to improve.

        As far as "Silver Bullets" -- it seems that every year or so, there's a new
        methodology that promises to reduce defects, shorten delivery times,
        increase profits, and clean out that bottom left desk drawer that
        I'm afraid to look in anymore. One difference I see with XP is that
        although there *is* a coherent system, its elements (or at least some of
        them) are more or less decoupled. Certainly Continuous Testing,
        Simple Design, Refactoring, Continous Integration and the 40 hour week
        all stand on their own. In fact, I once thought I had invented
        Continuous testing/integration and Simple Design. I guess I should
        have written a book....

        --
        Billy Chambless
        Planning Systems Incorporated
        (228) 687-8745
        bchambless@...
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