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RE: [XP] Questions questions questions

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  • Jason Gruber
    But to respond to the original post. I am learning C++ too. I am using Thinking in C++ by Eckel. It is very good and not overly complicated. Very intrested
    Message 1 of 20 , Feb 1, 2001
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      But to respond to the original post.

      I am learning C++ too.

      I am using Thinking in C++ by Eckel. It is very good and not overly
      complicated. Very intrested in the comments and your learning too. However
      I am sure that comp.lang.c++ is better for this.

      I am though as you can guess useing Borlands C++ builder not VC++ so dont
      have to go down that road and it is a very strange road too.

      I am a vb programmer but since .NET I am leaving the MS world for the
      Borland community and XP as the methodology.
    • David Corbin
      ... Can you recommend a book on CRC? I ve only read articles... ... -- David Corbin dcorbin@machturtle.com
      Message 2 of 20 , Feb 1, 2001
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        > Maybe a book on CRC or UML.

        Can you recommend a book on CRC? I've only read articles...

        > ----
        >
        > C. Keith Ray
        > <http://homepage.mac.com/keithray/resume.html>
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      • Dossy
        ... The CRC Card Book http://www.aw.com/cseng/titles/0-201-89535-8 - Dossy -- Dossy Shiobara mail: dossy@panoptic.com Panoptic Computer
        Message 3 of 20 , Feb 1, 2001
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          On 2001.02.01, David Corbin <dcorbin@...> wrote:
          > > Maybe a book on CRC or UML.
          >
          > Can you recommend a book on CRC? I've only read articles...

          The CRC Card Book
          http://www.aw.com/cseng/titles/0-201-89535-8


          - Dossy

          --
          Dossy Shiobara mail: dossy@...
          Panoptic Computer Network web: http://www.panoptic.com/
        • Paul Michali
          ... From a XP lurker, here are some books to consider (I liked them alot): Writing Solid Code - Steve Maguire The Pragmatic Programmer - Andrew Hunt & David
          Message 4 of 20 , Feb 1, 2001
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            Nicholas DiPiazza wrote:

            > Does anyone have any good books out there to recommend to
            > a future OOP programmer.. Does anyone suggest I should dip my nose into any
            > other languages for my benefit's sake?

            From a XP lurker, here are some books to consider (I liked them alot):

            Writing Solid Code - Steve Maguire
            The Pragmatic Programmer - Andrew Hunt & David Thomas
            Debugging the Development Process - Steve Maguire
            Code Complete - Steve McConnell
            Enough Rope to Shoot Yourself in the Foot - Allen I. Holub

            They cover other areas that may broaden your exposure, IMHO.
            As others have mentioned, the 3 XP books, the Design Patterns,
            Effective C++, and Refactoring books are also EXCELLENT.

            I'd STRONGLY suggest that you look into other languages. Coming
            from a C/C++ background, I've found that looking at languages like
            Java have helped me think more OO. I'm planning on looking at Ruby
            next, and if I can find time (fat chance :^), I'd like to tinker with Smalltalk.


            PCM (Paul Michali)

            Carrier Voice Gateway Business Unit (CVGBU)
            Cisco Systems, Inc.
            250 Apollo Drive
            Chelmsford, MA 01824

            Phone : (800) 572-6771 x 45817 (978) 244-5817 [direct]
            Paging: (800) 365-4578 [voice] pcm@... [email page]
          • Sean Zachariasen
            ... you re ... the ... Don t just get a book on the STL - get a book on the C++ Standard Library. A don t worry too much about other languages at this point.
            Message 5 of 20 , Feb 1, 2001
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              > You're going to want to get a good reference book for the environment
              you're
              > working in. If you're programming C++ in Microsoft's Visual Studio, I
              > suggest you get the MFC book (sorry, the title escapes me at the moment)
              > from Microsoft Press. I know it's a bit much that they expect you to buy
              the
              > manual separately, but it's worth the price, especially because the MFC
              > library is a pain to get your head around. If you're working away from the
              > Windows world, get a good reference to the Standard Template Library.

              Don't just get a book on the STL - get a book on the C++ Standard Library.

              A don't worry too much about other languages at this point. Master this
              one. I've always been of the opinion (no bigotry here - only a reference to
              complexity) that if you can master C++, then you can quickly grasp (and
              learn to appreciate) other languages. esp. Java

              Sean Zachariasen
            • Ron Jeffries
              ... There is some truth to this opinion. I m not comfortable with the original choice of C++ as a starting point, but you can certainly learn a lot from it.
              Message 6 of 20 , Feb 1, 2001
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                At 11:49 AM 2/1/2001 -0800, it seemed like Sean Zachariasen wrote:
                >A don't worry too much about other languages at this point. Master this
                >one. I've always been of the opinion (no bigotry here - only a reference to
                >complexity) that if you can master C++, then you can quickly grasp (and
                >learn to appreciate) other languages. esp. Java

                There is some truth to this opinion. I'm not comfortable with the original
                choice of C++ as a starting point, but you can certainly learn a lot from it.

                Kind of like cutting down a tree by hand so you can appreciate a chain saw,
                but you'll get real familiar with the wood, and you'll build up useful muscle.

                Regards,

                Ronald E Jeffries
                http://www.XProgramming.com
                http://www.objectmentor.com
              • John A. Maxwell
                Nicholas DiPiazza asked: [snip] ... C++ books: Thinking in C++ by Bruce Eckel Other books: The XP trilogy, of course. The
                Message 7 of 20 , Feb 1, 2001
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                  "Nicholas DiPiazza" <firelord@...> asked:
                  [snip]
                  > Does anyone have any good books out there to recommend to
                  > a future OOP programmer.. Does anyone suggest I should dip my nose into any
                  > other languages for my benefit's sake?
                  >
                  C++ books: "Thinking in C++" by Bruce Eckel

                  Other books: The XP trilogy, of course.

                  "The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs" by Abelson, Sussman, and Sussman.
                  This is my favorite introductory computer science book; after 20 years
                  as a professional programmer, it still taught me things when I first
                  read it. It uses a lisp dialect called Scheme. They cover a bit of OO
                  in there, but not a lot. The full text is online at
                  http://mitpress.mit.edu/sicp/sicp.html

                  Other languages: I won't bother telling you to learn Smalltalk,
                  because _many_ others will do that.

                  -John

                  --
                  John A. Maxwell (jmax@...)

                  "`You may recall Archelaus's explanation of earthquakes,' he said
                  cryptically. `Earthquakes were cause by air trapped in underground
                  caves. It shook the earth in its effort to escape. Everyone knew then
                  that the earth was flatulent.'"
                  -John MacPhee, Annals of the Former World
                • Vera Peeters
                  The book I found the most illuminating for learning OO is definitely Designing Object Oriented C++ Applications Using The Booch Method by Robert C Martin.
                  Message 8 of 20 , Feb 4, 2001
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                    The book I found the most illuminating for learning OO is definitely
                    "Designing Object Oriented C++ Applications Using The Booch Method" by
                    Robert C Martin.
                    Personally, I think the articles you can find in
                    http://www.objectmentor.com/publications/articlesByDate.html, explain
                    everything even more clearly. I especially like the first 4 of the
                    "Principles": Open-Closed Principle, Liskov Substitution Principle,
                    Dependency Inversion Principle and Interface Segragation Principle. Sadly
                    enough, the book he promises in those articles hasn't yet been finished. I
                    guess he's busy with other things these days....



                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: John A. Maxwell [mailto:jmax@...]
                    > Sent: vrijdag 2 februari 2001 5:30
                    > To: extremeprogramming@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: [XP] Questions questions questions
                    >
                    >
                    > "Nicholas DiPiazza" <firelord@...> asked:
                    > [snip]
                    > > Does anyone have any good books out there to recommend to
                    > > a future OOP programmer.. Does anyone suggest I should dip my
                    > nose into any
                    > > other languages for my benefit's sake?
                    > >
                    > C++ books: "Thinking in C++" by Bruce Eckel
                    >
                    > Other books: The XP trilogy, of course.
                    >
                    > "The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs" by
                    > Abelson, Sussman, and Sussman.
                    > This is my favorite introductory computer science book; after 20 years
                    > as a professional programmer, it still taught me things when I first
                    > read it. It uses a lisp dialect called Scheme. They cover a bit of OO
                    > in there, but not a lot. The full text is online at
                    > http://mitpress.mit.edu/sicp/sicp.html
                    >
                    > Other languages: I won't bother telling you to learn Smalltalk,
                    > because _many_ others will do that.
                    >
                    > -John
                    >
                    > --
                    > John A. Maxwell (jmax@...)
                    >
                    > "`You may recall Archelaus's explanation of earthquakes,' he said
                    > cryptically. `Earthquakes were cause by air trapped in underground
                    > caves. It shook the earth in its effort to escape. Everyone knew then
                    > that the earth was flatulent.'"
                    > -John MacPhee, Annals of the Former World
                    >
                    >
                    > To Post a message, send it to: extremeprogramming@...
                    >
                    > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                    > extremeprogramming-unsubscribe@...
                    >
                    > Ad-free courtesy of objectmentor.com
                    >
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