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RE: [XP] RE: Individual heroics vs. designed for replacement? ( W as Re: [XP ] Presence of irreplaceable people)

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  • Baker, Bram
    ... (this may or may not be way off topic, depending on your point of view, not too mention loooonnnggg) I got a ton o phrases like that. Maybe I ought to get
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 14, 2000
      >-----Original Message-----
      >From: Dossy [mailto:dossy@...]
      >Sent: 2000, December, 14 1:30 PM
      >To: 'extremeprogramming@egroups.com'
      >Subject: Re: [XP] RE: Individual heroics vs. designed for replacement? (
      >Was Re: [XP ] Presence of irreplaceable people)
      >
      >
      >On 2000.12.14, Baker, Bram <bram.baker@...> wrote:
      >> Approach life like a humble student. Approach everything like a beginner.
      >> Realize that everyone is your teacher. Realize there is no end.
      >
      >Did you just eat Chinese food for lunch? Sounds like a fortune
      >cookie, to me. ;-)
      >

      (this may or may not be way off topic, depending on your point of view, not
      too mention loooonnnggg)

      I got a ton 'o phrases like that. Maybe I ought to get into the fortune
      cookie business. Glib as they seem, there is a lot of wisdom in them thar
      fortune cookies.

      Actually, I find that martial arts is a very good analogy for software. I
      think its interesting that carpentry/buildings/architecture are used as
      analogies in the teachings of both software development and martial arts.

      Here's some comparisons I have made (dug up from a past e-mail) between Tai
      Chi principles and XP.

      Values - sorry could only remember 3 of 4 :(
      ----------
      XP: Feedback
      Tai chi: If one is to apply tai chi as a martial art, then one must be able
      to apply the technique of "stickiness". That is, once one is in contact with
      an opponent, one must be able to "stick" to the opponent. This means that
      you can follow your opponents movements, can see where they're going, how
      fast, etc. You are "listening" to their movements. Stickiness is one of the
      primary means of feedback in tai chi.
      When two tai chi folks "play" (i.e. spar/fight), this takes the form of a
      conversation. One person will attempt a move, possibly a strike. The other
      person will observe the movement, and react accordingly. The first movement
      is the question, the reaction is the answer. Each answer demands a new
      question. The "play" ends when one person has a question the other cannot
      answer. Feedback is absolutely required to answer your opponents questions.

      XP: Simplicity
      Tai chi: One learns how to relax. Relaxation is all about using only those
      muscles needed to accomplish the desired movement. Any and all muscles not
      being used should be relaxed.

      XP: Courage
      Tai chi: Courage is about facing fear. Tai chi fosters an attitude of
      receptivity of self. If this can be achieved, then one is able to face one's
      own fears, and (hopefully) can dissolve them. This is done primarily through
      meditation. Fear has no place in a martial art.

      Principles
      --------------
      XP: Play to win.
      Tai chi: Is a martial art. Play to live. Enough said.

      XP: YAGNI
      Tai chi: YDMIDM: "You don't move, I don't move. You move, I move faster.".
      No unnecessary movements. None. Zip. Ziltch.

      XP: OAOO
      Tai chi: TAOTT. (this is a stretch...) As mentioned above, unnecessary
      movements are removed to the extent possible by the practitioner. I am
      continuously amazed to discover again and again how simple and "refactored"
      tai chi really is. Watching someone doing tai chi, you will be impressed by
      the apparent complexity of the movements. Learning tai chi, you will be
      impressed by the simplicity required of the movements. What may seem to be a
      complex coordinated move is in fact a really simple coordinated move. For
      example, when lifting ones foot, *nothing* else should move (unless its
      supposed to). That is to say, when you move something, that "thing, and only
      that thing" (TAOTT :) ), should move.

      XP: DTSTTCPW
      Tai chi: Pay attention, or you lose. In martial combat, there is no time for
      fancy flying kicks or the spectacular acrobatic attacks you see in
      TV/movies, nor do we have the tolerance for pain that is portrayed in the
      movies. In real life, combat is very fast and deadly - if you get kicked in
      the throat or the balls, you're probably not going to get up. If you want to
      win, you only have time to respond to what your opponent does with the
      simplest, fastest, and most (importantly) appropriate technique. If you hold
      out for a chance to "step back, ride the tiger", use a "double lotus" or
      some such "killer move", you will get hit 'cause your focus is not on what's
      happening, but rather on looking for a opening to do your move. This is akin
      to looking for opportunities to implement a fancy hyper-optimal
      red-green-blue balanced splay tree to store your data in rather than a flat
      file, or a simple linked list or whatever. You lose your focus on what your
      supposed to be doing. You lose your time to market. In short, you lose.

      XP: Pair programming
      Tai chi: Push hands. This is a basic two person warm-up. It is one of the
      first things you ought to learn when doing tai chi. Despite its simplicity
      and "basic" level, this warm-up gets healthy attention in senior class. This
      simple exercise contains all of the basic techniques needed to spar
      effectively. No amount of solo training can compensate for not doing push
      hands. It is an essential aspect of the tai chi curriculum. If you're not
      doing push hands (pairing) you're not doing tai chi (XP).


      >
      >> Well, that's pretty airy-fairy. That's how I've learned martial arts
      though,
      >> that's how I've learned to develop software. I doubt there's much here
      that
      >> can be applied to an organization, or to XP. At the end of the day, it is
      up
      >> to each one of us.
      >
      >Another reason why software development is like martial arts:
      >
      > Kick ass first, ask questions later.
      >
      >(Or, as Kent puts it in the white book:
      >
      > "Play to win, don't play to not lose.")
      >
      >- Dossy
      >
      >--
      >Dossy Shiobara mail: dossy@...
      >Panoptic Computer Network web: http://www.panoptic.com/


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    • Jason Yip
      ... wrote: ... http://c2.com/cgi-bin/wiki?MartialArtsAsSoftwareDevelopmentMetaphor
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 14, 2000
        --- In extremeprogramming@egroups.com, "Baker, Bram "
        <bram.baker@r...> wrote:

        <snip>
        > Actually, I find that martial arts is a very good analogy for
        > software. I think its interesting that
        <snip>

        http://c2.com/cgi-bin/wiki?MartialArtsAsSoftwareDevelopmentMetaphor
      • Gleep
        I think poll is offensive! We dyslexics are not so easly confused you know. Dyslexics of the world untie!! Message: 2 Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2000 15:54:30 -0500
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 16, 2000
          I think poll is offensive!
          We dyslexics are not so easly confused you know.
          Dyslexics of the world untie!!
          Message: 2
          Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2000 15:54:30 -0500
          From: Ron Jeffries <ronjeffries@...>
          Subject: RE: Martial arts and Software was [Something else entirely]
          At 08:15 AM 12/15/2000 -0800, Robert Sartin wrote:
          > > > From: Jason Yip [mailto:j.c.yip@...]
          > > > Martial arts and Software was [Something else entirely]
          > > Isn't this subject line confusing for the dyslexics out there?
          >
          >Actually I think it's offensive. Should we have a poll?
          I have a poll for you. ;->
          Ronald E Jeffries
          http://www.XProgramming.com
          http://www.objectmentor.com



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